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Holeshot secrets?

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Let be be clear...I suck at holeshots, it doesn't matter if it is a ttr90 or a 250f I can't holeshot. once I was on a crf230 and a buddy of mine was on a crf100...and he still bet me. do I jest suck or is thare a secret to it?

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For Dead starts, I start by having the bike in 2nd gear, clutch pulled in .... looking downrange at the entry to the first corner .....Kick the bike hard and as your butt falls on the front on the seat and chest on the steering stem you redline the bike and feather out the clutch....This should all be done in kind of one motion . Also, When the flag guy says "Ten Seconds" i always count backwards in my head and do one or two dry runs ...heat up the clutch a little with the front brake pulled hard... Get yourself psyched up , You have one mission, get to that first corner, and no one else exists no matter what !

Watch some vids on it too . Im sure there are many methods. I seem to usually get good dead engine holeshots this way though . I dont use any Holeshot device either.

 

Here's a few holeshots I got (311) . I have a few vids too , dont wana hog the thread though ... haha

 

Got the Holeshot here but the two guys right behind me beat me in this race (they are on a 250 2T and a 150 Xc)

RRMC-Holeshot_zpsb7275dbe.jpg

 

Holeshot (311)  two 450's and a 300 right behind me  ...Broome Tioga

HoleShotBroome-2_zps298e75d4.jpg

Holeshot (311) 

CowPattyHoleshot_zps3ed0777f.jpg

 

YZ125 (311) Holeshot against 450's 300's 250's

CowPattyHoleshot2012_zps88e2f8aa.jpg

 

YZ125  (311) almost holeshot against 450's  Unadilla Gncc

UnadillaYz125AlmostHoleshot_zpsbeb80a41.

Edited by avocasingletrack
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no. is it some thing I should get?

Yeah, it's a great magazine. Every month they have a skills section, it focuses on a part of the race. Jumps holeshots, etc. and that section is written by pro riders. The holeshots that I took a picture of was written by js7. If you want better shots tell me. I don't have my mag on me but I'll get it if you want.

PS. Go to twmx.com for some preview. It's pretty expensive.

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Sometime your competitors are asleep on the line......You don't pull a holeshot like this without being on the ball.....

 

018.jpg

 

My best advice is commit. I beat a row of 450s a couple weeks ago on my 250 2t mostly due to the fact that I WILL NOT shut off the throttle and get on the brakes until I absolutely have too. Too many guys shut off early and just coast into the corner because they don't want to get bumped. I have always been a good holeshot guy though.....I have lots of little tricks I use to my full advantage....

 

3229cf88.jpg

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There are no secrets, it's all about skills and aggression. If you want to get better starts you need to put in the time to practice them.

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Motocross "gated" starts are totally different then dead-engine GP style starts.

Getting the launch is tricky and takes a lot of timing skill and PRACTICE!

I stay away from the gate itself, back about a foot or two. I concentrate on the gate whilst doing the steps below. When the gate starts to drop, I launch and since we have concrete gates out here, the moment I'm on the dirt, its full power. With concrete you've gotta be super careful as its slick, dirt starts are way easier.

The idea is to load up the bike to the point of the rear wheel almost breaking traction on the dirt or concrete starting gate.

Its hard to do this with just the clutch, because if you were to drop the clutch (as your launch), you may bog or stall, especially on a 125.

So the trick is actually use your front brake as the "starting" lever, not the clutch.

Using the same technique as explained above, you rev the motor up and find the clutch engagement point. The difference in my technique is that I use the front brake to hold my bike from moving forward. This actually loads up the suspension and gets the rear wheel right on the edge of spinning up. You need it to be in that place, so when you release the front brake, you get all that power to the ground instantly. I've tried not using the front brake and using the front brake and found a considerable difference in both techniques.

But yea, sound advice above especially when discussing gear selection and feet position.

Edited by tye1138
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I've always done well on starts if only I could finish in the same position. :banghead:

 

I think most guys already know but on the gate you can usually watch the mechanism under the gate which actually moves a split second before the gate. When it moves I go

 

I always picture myself being the first on in the corner, I'm not going to try and be there first I know I will be. Only other thing I do different from what I see some guys do, clutch control. If the front wheel starts to lift never let off the gas, just a little clutch. I think good clutch control is key.

 

.

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I always picture myself being the first on in the corner, I'm not going to try and be there first I know I will be. Only other thing I do different from what I see some guys do, clutch control. If the front wheel starts to lift never let off the gas, just a little clutch.

 

.

Yes. Exactly !

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I spannered for a pro-rider a few years ago. Never any good at hole shots. Tightened his chain and he got 9 from 9. Then crashed out from a 1/4 lap lead all 9 races :lol: .

 

I fully agree with Monk. Don't let off until the last second. Bike setup plays apart as always. Angle the bike in the direction you Intend to head in. And I don't go hard off the concrete, I take off like I'm on a Sunday ride with the and boyz, 2nd, sometimes 3rd gear, heaps of clutch trying not to spin the tire. I wait until I feel the rear tire hit dirt, move all my weight over the back of the bike and give it the berries. Race changes through the gears.

 

I was racing at a track that scares the crap out of me and didn't want the holes shot so took off really easy. Got the hole shot. Next start I took off even easier. got the hole shot again and then the 3rd just for good measure. The last one was the only deliberate hole shot out of the 3.

Edited by AddictedToBling

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I stay away from the gate itself, back about a foot or two.

Its hard to do this with just the clutch, because if you were to drop the clutch (as your launch), you may bog or stall, especially on a 125.

 

 

Probably the worst advice I've heard about starts.  Why the hell would you start two feet back from where the gate drops especially if your using the front brake?  Have you ever seen a MX/SX pro race?  Every single guy is within an inch or two of the gate.  And the guys that start further back, slowly creep up trying to anticipate the drop.  Your a beginner, please stop giving out advice.

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Motocross "gated" starts are totally different then dead-engine GP style starts.

Getting the launch is tricky and takes a lot of timing skill and PRACTICE!

I stay away from the gate itself, back about a foot or two. I concentrate on the gate whilst doing the steps below. When the gate starts to drop, I launch and since we have concrete gates out here, the moment I'm on the dirt, its full power. With concrete you've gotta be super careful as its slick, dirt starts are way easier.

The idea is to load up the bike to the point of the rear wheel almost breaking traction on the dirt or concrete starting gate.

Its hard to do this with just the clutch, because if you were to drop the clutch (as your launch), you may bog or stall, especially on a 125.

So the trick is actually use your front brake as the "starting" lever, not the clutch.

Using the same technique as explained above, you rev the motor up and find the clutch engagement point. The difference in my technique is that I use the front brake to hold my bike from moving forward. This actually loads up the suspension and gets the rear wheel right on the edge of spinning up. You need it to be in that place, so when you release the front brake, you get all that power to the ground instantly. I've tried not using the front brake and using the front brake and found a considerable difference in both techniques.

But yea, sound advice above especially when discussing gear selection and feet position.

 

Yes and no. In theory its all the same, with the same goal being to get to the corner first. Some of our starts are dead, others are live MX style with either a gate or just the drop of the flag......

 

Even in a gated start I still holeshot many races. My biggest advantage is I just don't shut off......

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Why the hell would you start two feet back from where the gate drops especially if your using the front brake?

Remember, the advice is directed towards someone who doesn't know how to start, someone seeking advice on how to become a better starter. Part of that is to do something you normally wouldn't think of doing. You aren't gonna learn how to make a decent jump off the gate pretending start like a professional, a few inches away from the gate, thats not going to work. You learn how to get that jump by being farther away from the gate. Then over time, you get closer and closer to the gate, once you have the skills.

Have you ever seen a MX/SX pro race?  Every single guy is within an inch or two of the gate.  And the guys that start further back, slowly creep up trying to anticipate the drop.

Unless I'm missing something, the OP most likely has a long road in front of him before becoming a professional rider.

Your a beginner, please stop giving out advice.

And you're a troll, stop trolling.

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Yes and no. In theory its all the same, with the same goal being to get to the corner first. Some of our starts are dead, others are live MX style with either a gate or just the drop of the flag......

If you don't get the jump, you aren't going to make it to the first corner before everyone else. The jump is the most critical aspect and I bet a quick go pro onboard video would show you have a pretty big lead over your competition before you even hit the first corner. It's not the shutting off thats winning you hole shots, its the jump (getting the power down), which is giving you the advantage.

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If you don't get the jump, you aren't going to make it to the first corner before everyone else. The jump is the most critical aspect and I bet a quick go pro onboard video would show you have a pretty big lead over your competition before you even hit the first corner. It's not the shutting off thats winning you hole shots, its the jump (getting the power down), which is giving you the advantage.

 

Maybe racing in Pro getting the jump could be more critical, but in good ol' regular racing its just not as apparent......Lots of people are simply horrible at cornering and shut-off the throttle early. Even against the 450s a couple weeks ago a guy on a '13 450sxf had a decent jump on me but he stayed wide and shut of early.....  

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...is there a secret to it?

 

140/80-18 IRC M5B on the back of a CR500. There's something wrong if you DON'T get the holeshot. 

 

 

 

 

 

But seriously, I (using the set-up above) usually try and find a good line when I pull into a gate spot. I go through in my head how I'm going to follow that line and how that first turn is gonna go, all while beating everybody else to it. I usually don't do anything crazier than a 3rd gear start. Though, I feel that may be changing next season.... ;)

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Remember, the advice is directed towards someone who doesn't know how to start, someone seeking advice on how to become a better starter. Part of that is to do something you normally wouldn't think of doing. You aren't gonna learn how to make a decent jump off the gate pretending start like a professional, a few inches away from the gate, thats not going to work. You learn how to get that jump by being farther away from the gate. Then over time, you get closer and closer to the gate, once you have the skills.

Unless I'm missing something, the OP most likely has a long road in front of him before becoming a professional rider.

And you're a troll, stop trolling.

 

Doesn't matter if its a beginner, intermediate or pro, I would never advice someone to start 2 feet back from the gate.  Thats just a bad technique.  Anyway, you tell him to start two feet back so he doesn't hit the gate then the next sentence you tell him to hold the front brake to load the suspension before starting.  Thats an intermediate to advance technique.  Its hard enough to figure out the right amount of clutch/throttle, weight distribution, traction and shifting when starting but if you throw in the front brake that just complicates it even more and is far beyond what he should be practicing at his skill level.  Once again, stop giving out bad advice.

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Maybe racing in Pro getting the jump could be more critical, but in good ol' regular racing its just not as apparent......Lots of people are simply horrible at cornering and shut-off the throttle early. Even against the 450s a couple weeks ago a guy on a '13 450sxf had a decent jump on me but he stayed wide and shut of early.....

Yes, but at least he had the jump. So first get the jump down, then once you're out in front, you're home free. Doesn't matter if you get through the first corner in first, what matters is that you're at the front of the pack. The skill set necessary to NOT let off and corner harder then everyone else, is far more complex then getting a good jump.

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