shock linkage bearings

I've searched until my vision got blurry and my laptop battery is almost dead. I picked up an '06 450r for a good price knowing it needed some tlc. The bearings in the shock link need to be replaced. Two of the bearings are side by side and I need to get them out. I've read that you can push them both out at the same time, BUT I've also read that you can't because there is a lip or it is tapered inbetween the bearings so they can't be pressed out on the same side. So the $64,000 question is..... (1) Can I use the 2 socket and threaded rod method and press both bearings out together? (2) Do I need a blind hole bearing puller to remove the bearings? (3) Can I use a punch from the opposite side to tap them out? (doesn't sound like this method won't gouge up the link though)

Edited by alarmin

You can push both bearings out the same side. You can use bearing pullers or just sockets in a vice.

I believe there is a clip in there and they can only be pushed out in one direction so double check after removing the seals to make sure.  I had the same issue on my 05.

2 answers and they're both different. Has anyone done this on an '06 450R? Honda said they'd press them out for $15, but sometimes it's not just the money, it's the challenge..... Or should I just get my head out of my a$$ and pay the $15????

PM sent

PM sent

 

Do you mind posting here so others (Including Me) can see what you have to say?

 

Thanks

I 'm courious too. I tried the threaded rod socket method could not get it to budge. I pushed towards I believe the side with the resivoir. One side is bigger than the other. Finally gave up.

I can speak for the bikes I currently own which are the last Gen CR's and current CRF's. All four models have the same linkage parts. I use a vice and a large socket on one side of the linkage and a same size (as the bearing being removed) on the other. I tighten the vice and the bearing(s) move out the side with the bigger socket. On the models I own, the bearings can be pushed out either side with no issues. I can't speak for older bikes and I never leave the bearings for more than a season. Regardless of how diligent I am with greasing and how little I use the power washer, the smallest bearing in the link gets damaged regularly.

I can speak for the bikes I currently own which are the last Gen CR's and current CRF's. All four models have the same linkage parts. I use a vice and a large socket on one side of the linkage and a same size (as the bearing being removed) on the other. I tighten the vice and the bearing(s) move out the side with the bigger socket. On the models I own, the bearings can be pushed out either side with no issues. I can't speak for older bikes and I never leave the bearings for more than a season. Regardless of how diligent I am with greasing and how little I use the power washer, the smallest bearing in the link gets damaged regularly.

 

Can you offer any insight on what you do to grease these bearings? My Imagination tells me to just just disassemble and smear some grease into the rollers with my finger?

When I take the linkage off the bike I check to see if there is still grease left in the bearings. I use a red colored synthetic grease that turns pink over time. If the bearing is dry and rusted it's done and needs replacement. (Don't try to clean and re-grease a dry and rusty bearing). For a good used bearing I wipe out the old grease and clean the inner bushing with a Scott paper shop towel. Then I just apply new grease with my finger and push the inner back in and wipe off the excess grease. For new bearings it's the same but no cleaning first. It's surprising how little grease comes on brand new bikes too.

Our 250F had more grease on the sides of the bearings than inside where it should be. Same on the steering head. I hope this helps.

Looking at the diagram can answer about 95% of assembly and "whats in there" questions.

 

If you notice, there is nothing betweent the outer bearing shells. So they can be pressed in and out from one side or the other. Just make a mental note of where they sit in the link so they'll index properly on the spacers and seals etc.

 

I agree with the sentiment that new bikes should be disassembled before being ridden. My new bike had almost no grease in the linkage at all. A "smidgen" would be an over statement. A "new to you" bike should always be torn down. The original owner may not have done anything at all from new and now you could be looking at some junk parts.

 

Use a good water proof wheel bearing grease on the linkage parts. Pack as much grease in there as you can. There is no such thing as too much grease when it comes to bearings.

 

 

 

1900B.png

Picture2.png

 

I did My 2005 CRF 450R Over the weekend, and the black arrows show bearings that can be pushed out from either side, while the red arrow shows bearings that can only be pressed out to the outside of the part. This link has machined bearing pockets rather than just a through hole with nothing between the bearings.

 

On another note, I found it easiest to push all of the linkage bearings toward the outside of the part, while the Swingarm bearings can go either way pretty easily. For the Parts labeled with black arrows, I cut a piece of 1/4" flatstock to be 3/8 x 1/4 x the width of the aluminum pocket and ground off the corners making a stretched out Octagon shape. I was then able to get the piece between the bearings and turn it sideways to hit on the outer race, and I used the old bushings to push on the flatstock. For the Bearings with red arrows I used a 5/16" flat washer with two sides ground down slightly and was able to lay that flat against the outer race and tap it out with the old bushings and a hammer on a vise with the jaws just par apart enough to allow the bearings to fall through but keep the part on top.

 

To press the bearings in, I turned down the end of a piece of 1" round stock to fit perfectly inside the bearing to align itself while leaving the rest of the stock to push on the outer races. I then used a vice and this tool to push the bearings in using a piece of plate steel between the vise and the aluminum to keep it from leaving teeth marks in the part. I also put the bearings in the freezer for a few hours before I started, and put a thin coating of oil on the interface surface of the aluminum and the bearings went in pretty easily. I also left the Small Plastic pieces in the bearings to hold the needles in place while I was pressing them, just to save the headache of having to look for one little needle on the floor.

 

I hope I helped someone with all that, but at least i know how to do it now! :thumbsup:

 

-Tyler

I always used a steel rod about 3/8ths in diameter and went from the opposite side of the one you are working on and tapped around them using the rod as a chisel and a hammer to tap that. I set it in the vice and tighten it with said bearings to come out facing down. Done it like that for almost 30 years. Use a aluminum dowel I shaved perfect to the od of the bearing and a vice to press them in with a bit of grease in the knuckle. You want them flat with the inner surface the dust seal goes on.

I was rebuilding some knuckles this past weekend and when I went to grab my PivotWorks bearing kit was disappointed to find the kit didn't include the lower shock bearing. WTF I could have sworn they have in the past. So I just ordered a handful of the lower shock bearings and seals.

I was rebuilding some knuckles this past weekend and when I went to grab my PivotWorks bearing kit was disappointed to find the kit didn't include the lower shock bearing. &%$#@! I could have sworn they have in the past. So I just ordered a handful of the lower shock bearings and seals.

 

Mine did come with lower shock bearings.

I had a local shop press out the old bearings. I put the new bearings in myself using the 2 socket method and a large bench vice. Thanks to all for your help.

Try cutting a slot in the bearing outer race and it will come out easy.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now