New 2007 CRF250X

Hey all, just picked up a 2007 CRF250X. It is fairly clean, but it does appear to have sat for a little longer than I thought. Here are some pictures of it.

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You'll notice that the headlight was replaced with a number plate. He had it so I put it back on.

 

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The idle is not constant so I think that the carb is dirty. Going to order a new jets probably and stick them in there and pull the carb for a good cleaning. 2007 is a little hard to find information for jetting wise. Anything I should look at on this bike to service?

 

The back number plate on the right side also is melted because the previous owner replaced the plastics with white ones on the rear to make it look newer and didn't put the heat shield in. You can tell in person but not in any pictures.

Looks like a nice bike!

 

Carb being dirty is a good bet being that it sat and you smart just to get some new jets.  For setup, check the jetting stickie at the top of the fourm.

 

 I might also replace the fuel line while your at it.  As they get older, then tend to breakup on the inside and dump junk into the carb.  

 

Jim.

This is just my opinion, but with winter still in the air, you would have time to get these things done.  This is a list of items I usually do with used bikes to get them ready and get an idea of what I am dealing with.

 

1. Remove front and rear wheels and check bearings.  They should be smooth with no rough spots.  if there are even the slightest, replace them.  Clean and regrease the axle when you reinstall.

2. Using the manual, pull the forks, drain the oil, and refill it.  You can also inspect the teflon sliders for excessive wear.  Kits for these are pretty cheap.

3. While you have the forks off, regrease the stem bearings.  These usually do not go bad since the is little rotational wear on them

4. Remove the linkage and inspect those bearings.  these are often overlooked and can take a beating.  At the very least, regrease.

5.  Same with the swingarm

6. check upper shock bearing.  those get hashed pretty easy depending on the type of riding that was done.

7. then the usual; replace chain and sprockets and get a new air filter.  Also inspect brake pads and replace if needed.  Don;t forget to flush brake fluid as they tend to attract moisture and need flushed once a year.

 

If you can get this done, your bike will be at a point then you have a fairly fresh starting point and know where everything sits in regards to maintenance. And if you can keep that up, then the bike will last a very long time.

This is just my opinion, but with winter still in the air, you would have time to get these things done.  This is a list of items I usually do with used bikes to get them ready and get an idea of what I am dealing with.

 

1. Remove front and rear wheels and check bearings.  They should be smooth with no rough spots.  if there are even the slightest, replace them.  Clean and regrease the axle when you reinstall.

2. Using the manual, pull the forks, drain the oil, and refill it.  You can also inspect the teflon sliders for excessive wear.  Kits for these are pretty cheap.

3. While you have the forks off, regrease the stem bearings.  These usually do not go bad since the is little rotational wear on them

4. Remove the linkage and inspect those bearings.  these are often overlooked and can take a beating.  At the very least, regrease.

5.  Same with the swingarm

6. check upper shock bearing.  those get hashed pretty easy depending on the type of riding that was done.

7. then the usual; replace chain and sprockets and get a new air filter.  Also inspect brake pads and replace if needed.  Don;t forget to flush brake fluid as they tend to attract moisture and need flushed once a year.

 

If you can get this done, your bike will be at a point then you have a fairly fresh starting point and know where everything sits in regards to maintenance. And if you can keep that up, then the bike will last a very long time.

 

Wow, lots to do. But you are right. Now is the time to do it if I am going to at all. The more I get thinking about it all, the more that I want to do while it is cold. I'll just add to your list because those are all excellent things. Already even ordered a new air filter last night so right on there. Usually go through the carb of a used bike myself, thats the really big one for me. Now the forks are something I haven't ever done.

 

8. Clean carb and replace jets and go up on main jet two sizes and pilot a size, drop in 2006 needle while I am at it to get the adjustability (this is at least my plan)

9. Inspect valves

10. Replace that melted rear number plate, not that it matters much but it bugs the crap out of me

11. Replace fuel line and add inline filter (this was a great idea Jim, hadn't thought about it)

 

Now the jetting that I am thinking about running is basically what the sticky said. There is a fella,Bturner44, running the NCVT needle 3rd position down, 155 main, 48 pilot with the air box opened, back fire screen removed, and exhaust baffle removed. Don't plan to remove the exhaust baffle so I was thinking 150 main, 45 pilot and open the air box a little. I don't want to remove the screen in the air box but am considering it. I have tuned the carbs on my old bikes so that isn't a big deal. Thinking about doing plug chops on this particular bike though. Make sure it is right. When it warms up to riding temp.

 

Forks are things I have never done so we will see if I can. I'd like to learn how though. Suppose we will see how the valves are first. Starts really easy even in this weather. Which my dealer, who rides one, says that is a good indication that they are alright.

Wow, lots to do. But you are right. Now is the time to do it if I am going to at all. The more I get thinking about it all, the more that I want to do while it is cold. I'll just add to your list because those are all excellent things. Already even ordered a new air filter last night so right on there. Usually go through the carb of a used bike myself, thats the really big one for me. Now the forks are something I haven't ever done.

 

8. Clean carb and replace jets and go up on main jet two sizes and pilot a size, drop in 2006 needle while I am at it to get the adjustability (this is at least my plan)

9. Inspect valves

10. Replace that melted rear number plate, not that it matters much but it bugs the crap out of me

11. Replace fuel line and add inline filter (this was a great idea Jim, hadn't thought about it)

 

Now the jetting that I am thinking about running is basically what the sticky said. There is a fella,Bturner44, running the NCVT needle 3rd position down, 155 main, 48 pilot with the air box opened, back fire screen removed, and exhaust baffle removed. Don't plan to remove the exhaust baffle so I was thinking 150 main, 45 pilot and open the air box a little. I don't want to remove the screen in the air box but am considering it. I have tuned the carbs on my old bikes so that isn't a big deal. Thinking about doing plug chops on this particular bike though. Make sure it is right. When it warms up to riding temp.

 

Forks are things I have never done so we will see if I can. I'd like to learn how though. Suppose we will see how the valves are first. Starts really easy even in this weather. Which my dealer, who rides one, says that is a good indication that they are alright.

I think when I first got my bike and still had the stock exhaust I was on the 140 to 145 range for the main jet.  With an aftermarket pipe and CC mods I was in the 155 to 160 range.  With a cam I ended up jumping to 170.

 

Rockymountain ATV has a great video section for those things you have never done before.  Forks are one of the most neglected parts on a bike and often never get touched with the exception of the clickers.  But if you oil is moisturre bound and cavitated, then you are losing a lot that they have to offer.  

 

Valves are a must to check.  That can also be causing some idle issues and its pretty simple.  Do you have a manual?

A150-155 main, with 45 slow jet will put you in the ball park for sea level.  45 slow jet may be a bit rich.  If your pilot screw end up <1 turn, drop to a 42.

 

I have stock exhaust on an '09, top of the airbox removed, and I'm running a 158 main with a JD Red needle, clip in the 5th position, and a 42 slow jet.   I know I'm a bit rich, but it runs pretty darn well I'd rather have the motor run a bit cooler.

 

Jim.

I do not have a manual yet. The dealer is going to lend me his manual for my first oil change. Already bought the filter and had the oil on hand. Autozone had it on clearance so I just bought every bottle they had. 10W-40 synthetic. Also bought the 20W-50 synthetic but I believe that is not recommended on this bike. Going to give it to my brother for his bike. 

 

Typically I run my bikes a tad on the rich side. So I will probably do it on this bike as well. Need the fuel screw as well, like having those. Going to hop into it tonight or tomorrow. Truck oil change is in the near future so that will likely come first. 

 

Edit: And I have watched those videos before and they are really helpful. Thanks, I'll look for the one on the forks.

 

2nd Edit: Any opinions on the Pro X jets vs. OEM? There is such a price difference. Going to go ahead and order the no toil super-flo kit. Looks decent but will require rejetting. Going to try and get some riding in so that I can compare the rejet and the filter together compared to stock. Maybe this weekend if it dries up.

Edited by jostith

I generally get my jets from one of two places, RMATV or JETRUS.  Jet R Us has an OEM equivalent that seems fine to me.  The holes appear the same and the brass still seems to hate sitting in ethanol whether its the expensive jet or the cheaper ones.

 

If you have any questions about maintenance, you can PM me with questions.  The only thing i haven't done is cylinder plating.  I leave that to Millennium. 

Hey man I appreciate it. I actually ordered the jets a few minutes ago from JETRUS. Got a fuel filter and stainless allen bolt kit too. Would have usually just had work order those for me from Fastenal but was in a mood I suppose. I did order the No-Toil Superflo Kit so we will see. Walked out to the garage to see how the filter was...when I pulled it out I noticed that the outside edge was falling off. So came back in, ashamed, and just ordered the kit. Also got an MSR fuel screw, couldn't find any topics about them not being any good on here. Should be able to get the carb dialed in with a weekend of work on it. Should have completely pulled the filter when viewing the bike I suppose.

 

Though I do have a question since you mentioned RMATV jets. Are the Pro-X jets any different or worst than OEM? They were really cheap. Some topic about TRX400's said that they weren't any good.

 

Also you are the man. You helped me with one of my XR's in the past I believe. The 250 I believe, which I sold 4 years ago or so. It was an 86'. Was surprised to see you respond to my thread. Thanks. I will have questions. This bike is going to be a new ball game for me. Used to the XR's and my DRZ which never needed anything done to it. This one will be worth it though. Love the insured by portion of your sig.

Hey man I appreciate it. I actually ordered the jets a few minutes ago from JETRUS. Got a fuel filter and stainless allen bolt kit too. Would have usually just had work order those for me from Fastenal but was in a mood I suppose. I did order the No-Toil Superflo Kit so we will see. Walked out to the garage to see how the filter was...when I pulled it out I noticed that the outside edge was falling off. So came back in, ashamed, and just ordered the kit. Also got an MSR fuel screw, couldn't find any topics about them not being any good on here. Should be able to get the carb dialed in with a weekend of work on it. Should have completely pulled the filter when viewing the bike I suppose.

 

Though I do have a question since you mentioned RMATV jets. Are the Pro-X jets any different or worst than OEM? They were really cheap. Some topic about TRX400's said that they weren't any good.

 

Also you are the man. You helped me with one of my XR's in the past I believe. The 250 I believe, which I sold 4 years ago or so. It was an 86'. Was surprised to see you respond to my thread. Thanks. I will have questions. This bike is going to be a new ball game for me. Used to the XR's and my DRZ which never needed anything done to it. This one will be worth it though. Love the insured by portion of your sig.

I have an XR600 that I ran before the 250X.  After restoring it she just sits in the garage collecting dust.  The CRF is such an awesome bike in any terrain.  Sure, it does take a little more work, but its worth it.  Keep up on the maintenance and it should be fine for years to come.  The biggest thing is keeping an eye on the valves, fluid changes, and a clean and oiled airfilter.

 

If the airfilter was falling apart, you should assume the PO didn't do much to it.  That means those tidbits of things to do should get your attention soon and flush out anything hidden in the bike.

 

Someone once told me that all used bikes have secrets.  Some secrets are big, some secrets are little.  Some bikes can keep their secrets for a long time, while other bikes want to spill their guts on the first ride.  Of those secrets, some are pretty minor when they finally tell you.  But other secrets can end up being pretty costly.  No matter what it is, all used bikes have secrets and the only way to flush them out is by stripping it apart and find them before the bikes tells you.

 

As for the jets, I have a pretty good collection of brass bits in my garage and couldn't tell you what brand all of them are.  I do know that I have never had any problems with them.  Kind of watch what you read on some of these posts.  The guys are a great resource, but sometimes people just like to rant about things an may not have the full picture on what they are talking about.  Heck, I get corrected from time to time and its a good way to learn from a lot of folks who have been doing this for a lot longer than me.

 

send what questions you have.  now get out there are start taking that girl apart, get rid of those secrets, and get ready for this spring.  there is a lot of dirt to rip up and gas to burn.

I've used the Pro-X jets without having any issues.  I'm pretty sure my closest dealer sells pro-x jets for oem prices..nice, huh?  They do the same thing with valve shims.

 

It sounds like you are on the right track with your plans.  FYI, getting to the carb to make jetting changes is a real pita!

My dealer isn't like that. Bunch of good guys with highish prices. But a lot of the time I don't mind paying because I like the guys. They lent me that OEM service manual, it was his personal manual. Real nice guys. 

 

I am really hoping that I don't have to get in the carb more than a few times. But it is really worth it to tune the carb correctly. But I am thinking I might have some issues with the jets I bought. Not planning on cutting the air box. Doubt I'll pull the baffle for now either. The superflo kit is on the way and so is a NCVT needle. Got 148 to 155 mains for future mods, such as exhaust. Pilot jets are 42 and 45. Might be ordering two other smaller main jets. These bikes are jetted lean from the factory right?

Why would you buy the superflo kit and then not mod the airbox per Honda?

 

It stands to reason that if you bought the superflo kit then you are seeking more power.  Honda tells you how to get more power out of the bike...why not do what they say?

That is a very fair point and thought. I bought the super flo kit because I had to have a new filter no matter what. Down the road I may want to mod it a bit more but honestly I don't want to cut the box because I don't want to make that a weak points or dust and dirt. Right now don't even know if it needs more power because I haven't gotten to ride it. Always have cut my air boxes in the past but on this bike I'm just going to at least hold off. Down the road I'll need more power but for now I'm going to enjoy the bike for a trail bike and have some fun even if it is slower. Going to enjoy the handling improvement more than anything else over my DRZ.

You can count on wanting the extra power.  If you don't do the mod now you'll probably have to screw with the jetting again once you open it up.

That is a very fair point and thought. I bought the super flo kit because I had to have a new filter no matter what. Down the road I may want to mod it a bit more but honestly I don't want to cut the box because I don't want to make that a weak points or dust and dirt. Right now don't even know if it needs more power because I haven't gotten to ride it. Always have cut my air boxes in the past but on this bike I'm just going to at least hold off. Down the road I'll need more power but for now I'm going to enjoy the bike for a trail bike and have some fun even if it is slower. Going to enjoy the handling improvement more than anything else over my DRZ.

Like jetrep said, you will want the power.  Young or old, its like a drug to all of us.  That's one of the reasons why we do it.

That is a very fair point and thought. I bought the super flo kit because I had to have a new filter no matter what. Down the road I may want to mod it a bit more but honestly I don't want to cut the box because I don't want to make that a weak points or dust and dirt. Right now don't even know if it needs more power because I haven't gotten to ride it. Always have cut my air boxes in the past but on this bike I'm just going to at least hold off. Down the road I'll need more power but for now I'm going to enjoy the bike for a trail bike and have some fun even if it is slower. Going to enjoy the handling improvement more than anything else over my DRZ.

 

   Just pop the snorkle off and then poke some holes in the top of the box (I used a 1" pipe heated up, which poked nice neat holes).  This alone is quite an improvement.   I didn't follow the ccc mod (whole top and part of the side), because I often ride through high water and didn't want the box flooding.

 

    Filter does get dirter on top now, but it's not excessive.   It just proves too that it does need the extra openings to get more air.   And as the others have said, you'll need to re-do the jetting if you do open it up.

 

Jim.

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