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Inline fuel filters on 650L?

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Most of you guys running them on your 650L's? By the looks of my carb bowl I will install one.

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Nope......not doin it......there is a filter on the tube in the tank and also one under the small bowl nut on the side of the petcock..2 is enough for me i figure :thumbsup:

 

I`ve seen enough of those cheap arsed filters leak or break apart on the trail in my lifetime,,if you think they are needed then go for it bud......but get one of the alloy ones with the micro filter in it,at least they aren`t cheap crappy plastic..

 

B

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I know Brian...but the junk in the bowl was astounding. If it doesn't work out I am out 3 $....or half a beer at Chili's..!! When I removed the fuel screw last week I did not notice I had lost the o-ring...so will replace tomorrow. I did find that I was way off on the fuel screw...I was regarding a tight spot on the threads as bottom....but was way off.

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i just hate the cheap arsed readily available fuel filters people use......like the 3 boxes that Horri likely has on a shelf in his shop..

 

 

:devil:

 

B

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The filters in the tank and petcock are fine screens, plenty will make it through.

 

I put in a small in-line automotive metal-shell filter and haven't had a case of flooding or a plugged jet since.

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i just hate the cheap arsed readily available fuel filters people use......like the 3 boxes that Horri likely has on a shelf in his shop..

:devil:

B

so much junk in the carb...I agree...

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I always use the little cone micro filters on everything, & no problems. I wish I knew what micron size they pass.

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Me also I just buy name brand visu filters from motorcycle superstores

I run one on each feed from my Acerbis  no issues

 

 

1/4" Hose Barb spacer.gif 40-70 micron spacer.gif Porous Sintered Bronze spacer.gif In-Line spacer.gif Clear PET

 

 

0000-visu-filter-large-capacity-fuel-fil

Edited by Zimman

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Me also I just buy name brand visu filters from motorcycle superstores

I run one on each feed from my Acerbis no issues

1/4" Hose Barb spacer.gif 40-70 micron spacer.gif Porous Sintered Bronze spacer.gif In-Line spacer.gif Clear PET

http://images.motorcycle-superstore.com/productimages/OG/0000-visu-filter-large-capacity.

-fuel-filter.jpg[/quote.

]I went whole hog...bought a 1/4 Fram clear...2.99...huzzah!!

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i just hate the cheap arsed readily available fuel filters people use......like the 3 boxes that Horri likely has on a shelf in his shop..

:devil:

B

hahahaha..Horri and I have similar tastes in fuel filters!

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40-70 microns! :jawdrop:  Thats pretty big particles,oiy. Now I wonder what the petcock sock is? I think I've been wasting money now. :facepalm:

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The really small Visu sintered metal filter doesn't flow enough gas for extended wide open operation.  The slightly larger ones are OK. 

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Me also I just buy name brand visu filters from motorcycle superstores

I run one on each feed from my Acerbis  no issues

 

 

1/4" Hose Barb spacer.gif 40-70 micron spacer.gif Porous Sintered Bronze spacer.gif In-Line spacer.gif Clear PET

 

 

0000-visu-filter-large-capacity-fuel-fil

These are the exact ones that i use and they are k&n's. When you swap out the stock tank for an aftermarket plastic unit the screen in the stock tank is pressed in and in my case was not re-usable. I planned on installing a inline filter when i made the swap but figuired i would be safe for a week or so. My pig broke down on the way to work one morning at about 7am on a busy road. My carb was full of crud. I have heard several people complaining about these plastic inline filters, but i have been using them for over 2 years without any problems.

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A 40 micron object is about the smallest thing the unaided human eye can see, that is pretty small. 40 microns gives a good balance between effective filtering and fuel flow.

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i just hate the cheap arsed readily available fuel filters people use......like the 3 boxes that Horri likely has on a shelf in his shop..

 

 

:devil:

 

B

Most amusing.. :bonk: ,,But the real facts are ,,I don't use an inline fuel filter and am lucky to have the use of a shed to work on the bike

let alone any kind of shop..I'm with Brian on this though,,2 is enough ,,another is just excess weight.. :lol:

Edited by Horri

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I would say fuel flow should be a deciding factor when choosing an inline filter, because the whole system works by gravity only. Using a filter that is intended for an automotive engine may not work well, because they use fuel pumps and the flow rating on them must be at some specified PSI.

 

Are any of the filter's flow ratings obtained by gravity flow only? I have no idea, I've never considered using one and haven't done that much research on them. Those tiny sintered bronze filters, like the one above, may work just fine but how much surface area do they have compared to a paper filter? Will the plastic body hold up to all available fuel blends? I have seen some break, which is the reason for that last question.

 

I don't think it is a complicated choice, but I do think some real thought needs to be put into it.

 

With an O2 gauge, a change in the fuel mixture can be seen before having to switch from the main tank to reserve, well before the engine starts to stumble.

 

As part of maintenance, I drain the float bowl and clean the petcock sediment bowl during each oil change. Those are the low points in the system that will hold any junk and if it isn't allowed to accumulate, it won't be a problem.

 

I also replace the stock screens if they look compromised. I have only used the stock petcock and sediment bowl screens and have never had a problem.

 

There are also these: http://www.qualitycycleparts.com/Profill_in_tank_fuel_pre_filters_starting_at_25_0_p/ultra-mk2.htm

 

Even if there are good filters downstream of the tank, if the tank is full of crap there is a chance of a large mass of it instantly migrating to the filter and plugging it, shutting down the bike anyway. That would require the filter be removed road/trailside and then the crap in the tank has a straight shot to the carb. I think the pre-filter is a good idea. You can't look into your auto tank, but take a flashlight and look into your moto's tank sometime, you'll likely find sand sized particles at the bottom and maybe some fibers. The fuel from the station hose isn't exactly 100% clean.

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The spec sheets including flow data for the small Visu filters are here http://www.itw-fastex-cva.com/content/view/22/33/

I've never had an issue with the materials in these filters and I live in Southern California where the fuel is not the old school gasoline at all.

 

Any automotive filter with a paper type element will work fine flow wise.  It fitting in the available space is another issue.

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Used auto inline for years on my Harleys without a lick of complication. If the filter is designed for the diameter fuel line I can't see the need for any angst for using them. There flow rate is calculated on gravity flow, not pressurized . At least that is what the fellow at NAPA told me.

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Used auto inline for years on my Harleys without a lick of complication. If the filter is designed for the diameter fuel line I can't see the need for any angst for using them. There flow rate is calculated on gravity flow, not pressurized . At least that is what the fellow at NAPA told me.

The link that cleonard posted says flow is measured with 3 1/2" of head, so yeah, gravity. 7gph (was listed on the chart for the above filter)should be fine, but that is for a new filter.

I would say that letting a carburetor sit with fuel in it for extended periods will cause more problems with gunk than just using the stock filters. Even with an extra filter, there are still ways to plug up a carb, so just be aware of it and there shouldn't be any problems.

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