Wheel Balancing... Is this doable option?

So i got my new tires in for my new to me bike i bought, and i got on the phone and called around the 3 closest motorcycle shops/dealers and none of them will even touch my tires.. they said they dont mount/balance internet bought tires.. So i am just amazed by this and picked up a tire iron set for motorcycles for 15 bucks and will be planning to do it myself.. Question though i read that even on dirt bike tires its highly recommended to balance the tires to prevent cupping of the tires on the road.. so i was looking up different setups people used to balance there own tires and found a lot of them recommend the Marc Parnes wheel balancer set and for the KTM its nearly 200 bucks for the setup.. that is just insane.. Then i read some that use the harbor freight tool.. but its a 50/50 yay/nay on that one because so many come with binding bearings and bent rods throwing off the balancing.. So today i was looking at my bike and wandered why cant someone use the bike as a balancer?? I mean all you would have to do is remove 2 bolts and move the caliper out of the way and use the high quality bearings of the bike to tell you what side of the tire is the heavy spot.. I dont understand why noone does this.. instead of buying another expensive tool to do it...

Edited by Storx

You can get your dirt bike and dual sport wheels balanced plenty close enough with the time honored method of using the axle through the wheel hub balanced on a pair of jack stands method.  With that said, I now use the inexpensive $50 Harbor Freight motorcycle balancer.  You can usually get these with a 20% or 25% discount.  It works great and is very efficient and accurate.

I didnt think anybody bothered to balance mx tires.

Like, how would you add/subtract weight?

Like, how would you even notice if it was an ounce or two out of balance?

Like, wouldnt the first dirt clod to stick inbetween the nobbys or around a spoke throw it off anyhow?

 

True the wheel, that I understand, but not balance.

Single rim lock wheels will be 4-5 ozs out of balance.  That's a lot, even on a dirt bike.  If you do any higher speed riding, both front and rear wheels need balancing.

well the tires on the bike when i got it made the front bounce nearly going down the road.. and i was only going 45mph...so i want to get into balancing them myself. also the tires currently on the bike dont have the light spot circle near the valve stem...so may be making it worse.. but im taking them off as soon as i get my tire iron set..

I didnt think anybody bothered to balance mx tires.

Like, how would you add/subtract weight?

Like, how would you even notice if it was an ounce or two out of balance?

Like, wouldnt the first dirt clod to stick inbetween the nobbys or around a spoke throw it off anyhow?

 

True the wheel, that I understand, but not balance.

 

I'm with you on this one, if youre in the dirt i cant imagine it making a difference, i can on a dual sport, but not if its a knobby, an on/off road maybe, but not a knobby

If your front end is bouncing that much I would first check the bead is seated properly on the rim if it is then fit your new tyres and try that first before worrying about balancing generally you don't need to balance dirt wheels as said above they get full of dirt straight away and that throws them out anyway but it shouldn't bother you unless you're flying down the tarmac at 100mph

and the question remains:  How do you add weight to the "light side"?

Not like there are little lead weights to pinch on the side of the rim.

WOuld see those laying around every track.

 

How do you take weight off the heavy side?

 

I dont think this is applicable to mx bikes at all.....at least I never saw it.

 

Maybe the OT is thinking about the wheel trueing stand?  That it a common and needed adjustment to wheels for sure.  Could fabricate one, buy a cheap HarborFreight one, nice aftermarket one, or use your forks.  But that all is to true it, I'm not familiar with any aspect of balancing them.

Sane thoughts here. How would you balance a mx wheel?

You mention the wheel bouncing really bad going down the road. If it's a knobby tire, I've never road one on pavement that isn't a rough ride...

Assuming your referring to TRUING your wheel, use a spoke wrench on your spokes and adjust from there. YouTube has several good videos demonstrating how to

On a MX track you won't notice

But hauling ass in the desert you certainly will

Do this: Remove the spacers so that the seals don't provide drag. Either spread the brake pads and loosely mount the wheel or better yet as stated above, jackstands. The wheel will rotate to where the rim lock is on bottom. Take some solid core solder and wrap a spoke opposite the rim lock. Then another. And another, keeping opposite the rim lock and checking by very gently rotating the wheel to see where it stops repeatedly. Continue wrapping spokes until there is no heavy spot.

I've heard of guys clamping lead fishing weights to the spoke nipples for balancing.

Never saw a need for it myself in the dirt.

Stick on weights. I just stick enough on to counter the rim locks, it doesn't have to be exact. Plus a little bit of duct tape over them to help make sure they stay put.

 

image_8049.jpg

Edited by gots_a_sol

So i got my new tires in for my new to me bike i bought, and i got on the phone and called around the 3 closest motorcycle shops/dealers and none of them will even touch my tires.. they said they dont mount/balance internet bought tires.. So i am just amazed by this and picked up a tire iron set for motorcycles for 15 bucks and will be planning to do it myself.. Question though i read that even on dirt bike tires its highly recommended to balance the tires to prevent cupping of the tires on the road.. so i was looking up different setups people used to balance there own tires and found a lot of them recommend the Marc Parnes wheel balancer set and for the KTM its nearly 200 bucks for the setup.. that is just insane.. Then i read some that use the harbor freight tool.. but its a 50/50 yay/nay on that one because so many come with binding bearings and bent rods throwing off the balancing.. So today i was looking at my bike and wandered why cant someone use the bike as a balancer?? I mean all you would have to do is remove 2 bolts and move the caliper out of the way and use the high quality bearings of the bike to tell you what side of the tire is the heavy spot.. I dont understand why noone does this.. instead of buying another expensive tool to do it...

I use the Parnes balancer, It's a quality product, but I'm sure there are others that work. Sealed bearings often have drag and don't spin freely, making it impossible to balance with the axle. Balancer bearings spin freely.

Mike

Look up Mcp motorcycle wheel weights on ebay. The seller is jiminwc. Very nice product.

Got a link for you guys

http://m.ebay.com/itm/230858915489

Edited by StonedInNy

Consider balance beads. Tiny ceramic spheres inserted through the valve stem dynamically balance your wheels while you ride. I use them in the tubes of my XS650 chop and they work great. A kit can be had on flea-bay for about 15 bucks.

With the rim lock throwing the balance off, you could just add a rim lock directly across to balance it pretty close I think. It would also help keep your tire on in case of a flat.

I always balance off road tires even on my slow XR200s mainly because the rim locks cause enough out of balance for wheel bounce at 45mph.  I've found that used sealed bearings don't interfer with balancing.  Also a tire bead not properly seated will be out of round  and cause vibration issues, so check the molded line on both sides of the tire near the bead for even distance from the rim.  It is there to help determine if the tire beads seat properly to the rim.  My method:

 

Use jack stands or the bike as noted in previous posts.

 

The heavy side will settle at the bottom, mark it and then turn the wheel until the point is horizontal.

 

Add some weights to the opposite side and then let the heavy side settle to the bottom to check that the heavy spot hasn't moved. Repeat until the wheel is balanced.

 

I use to use bullitt shaped crimp on fish line weights, or lead fishing weight wire, on the spokes, but I now use adhesive alloy wheel weights that I shape to fit the profile of the rim.

Well, for balancing tires, couldn't you just use dyna beads? My dad used them on his Goldwing and made a HUGE difference, I love them and will put them on my bike as it will be a supermoto. Here's the demo video:

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