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Arizona Arizona Backcountry Discovery Route

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Is this on anyone's radar? Anyone done any of it yet? Ordered the map today.

Did most of the Az portion of the Great Western Trail last year, had a blast, and was thinking of doing Utah, but this new route looks interesting. 750 miles Mexico to Utah.

Mike

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Is this on anyone's radar? Anyone done any of it yet? Ordered the map today.

Did most of the Az portion of the Great Western Trail last year, had a blast, and was thinking of doing Utah, but this new route looks interesting. 750 miles Mexico to Utah.

Mike

Where did you order map from?

What bike did you use for GWT? I'd like to do this sometime this year. What's min fuel range (miles between fuel stops) you recommend?

Thanks.

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Where did you order map from?

What bike did you use for GWT? I'd like to do this sometime this year. What's min fuel range (miles between fuel stops) you recommend?

Thanks.

For the discovery route, Touratech. Also search "Arizona Backcountry Discovery Route" The map is by Butler.

For the GWT, "Driving the GWT in Arizona" is a must, available from Amazon. You will also need the Tonto, Coconino, and Kaibab NF Maps. A GPS with Maricopa, Yavapai, and Coconino counties is also useful as some trails are not marked.

I rode a KLR650, there were a couple of tough sections, but doable. Do not ride through Martin Canyon (Smiley Rock) unless you are a much better rider than I. A detour is available and even shows up on some maps as the GWT. I haven't taken the detour, but had a difficult time in Martin Canyon. There is a video on you tube taken from a 4x4 to give you an idea.

With the KLR, I didn't have to worry about gas, but I'd say you would want 100 mile range. Almost no fuel stops on the way, but lots of places to bail.

North of Flag, a lot of private and Navajo lands, unmarked, so again a GPS loaded is useful.

Mike

 

EDIT: delete Coconino NF, add Prescott NF. OOPS

Edited by Flagstaff

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Awesome! Thanks for the info. Will definitely get the maps. Have a Delorme PN60 GPS with a SPOT so gtg there. Have to decide whether to buy a larger tank for my 500EXC or take my 950SE as it has a 7.9 gal tank already.

Cheers and thanks again.

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Awesome! Thanks for the info. Will definitely get the maps. Have a Delorme PN60 GPS with a SPOT so gtg there. Have to decide whether to buy a larger tank for my 500EXC or take my 950SE as it has a 7.9 gal tank already.

Cheers and thanks again.

 

I screwed up. You don't need the Coconino, but the Prescott NF map. I have the PN20, DeLorme mapping is great for this.

 

Mike

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I have ridden all of the GWT from Nogalas to West Yellowstone. I have GPS tracks posted on GPSXchange.com I have basic Dual Sport route plus Adv Bike bypasses for the harder sections.

 

The AZ BDR is basically the same as GWT except from Globe to Flagstaff. I will be riding this section he week after 4/5 and posting tracks for this option.

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I have ridden all of the GWT from Nogalas to West Yellowstone. I have GPS tracks posted on GPSXchange.com I have basic Dual Sport route plus Adv Bike bypasses for the harder sections.

 

The AZ BDR is basically the same as GWT except from Globe to Flagstaff. I will be riding this section he week after 4/5 and posting tracks for this option.

 

Didn't think there was a GWT south of Phoenix?

 

Mike

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Didn't think there was a GWT south of Phoenix?

Mike

It goes from Mexico to Canada and is marked by the Forest Service and BLM off and on in various places (not well anywhere). The GWT.com web site explains he concept. As far as I know I am the only person who has recorded GPS tracks for it (GPSXchange.com) which is the only practical way to follow it. My route is Dual Sport quality where ever possible with Adv Bike bypasses. The BDR is basically he same except for Globe to Flagstaff.

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It goes from Mexico to Canada and is marked by the Forest Service and BLM off and on in various places (not well anywhere). The GWT.com web site explains he concept. As far as I know I am the only person who has recorded GPS tracks for it (GPSXchange.com) which is the only practical way to follow it. My route is Dual Sport quality where ever possible with Adv Bike bypasses. The BDR is basically he same except for Globe to Flagstaff.

 

Is your route "the route" or are they more like corridors with many possible routes? Reason I ask is I was unable to find anything comprehensive on the GWT, except the afore mentioned book for the Arizona portion. Before I found that I just pieced together sections. No series of paper maps available? If it's not marked, and you have no map, how do you know you are on it?

 

Sorry, not meant to be a challenge if it sounds that way, I really wish to know. Spent a lot of time trying just to figure out the Arizona portion.

 

I'm not usually a point to point rider, more a wanderer. Tech. challenged, I don't  know how to do tracks, just use the GPS for those "where the hell is I" moments.

 

Thanks, Mike

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Is your route "the route" or are they more like corridors with many possible routes? Reason I ask is I was unable to find anything comprehensive on the GWT, except the afore mentioned book for the Arizona portion. Before I found that I just pieced together sections. No series of paper maps available? If it's not marked, and you have no map, how do you know you are on it?

 

Thanks, Mike

That is exactly what I found when I started three years ago. From the web site it was a concept, then I think someone at OHVCC got some forests to mark a route. I am quite sure it is not a congressionally designated trail or it would be marked better and would not be for motorized use.

 

The problem is they just marked a route in the forest with no access to gas, food, and lodging and some sections are not motorized. I have a track form gas to gas at about 100 mile intervals and lodging at 200 miles. If you follow my tracks you will come to a GWT sign every now and then. What I found is that they did not mark the turns well, about half the signs are just along a road but at least you know you are on it.

 

Not rocket science to download tracks from internet to PC then download them to GPS, you should join he 21st century.

Edited by Countdown

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That is exactly what I found when I started three years ago. From the web site it was a concept, then I think someone at OHVCC got some forests to mark a route. I am quite sure it is not a congressionally designated trail or it would be marked better and would not be for motorized use.

 

The problem is they just marked a route in the forest with no access to gas, food, and lodging and some sections are not motorized. I have a track form gas to gas at about 100 mile intervals and lodging at 200 miles. If you follow my tracks you will come to a GWT sign every now and then. What I found is that they did not mark the turns well, about half the signs are just along a road but at least you know you are on it.

 

Not rocket science to download tracks from internet to PC then download them to GPS, you should join he 21st century.

 

 

Ok

 

I think we're on different pages. I appreciate your info, but not your advice.

 

Thanks, Mike

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Ok

 

I think we're on different pages. I appreciate your info, but not your advice.

 

Thanks, Mike

Mike,

 

Could be on different pages, what kind of bike are you riding? If you are on anything larger than 550 the BDR is good route to follow. If on a Dual Sport bike, I spend days riding and scouting each possible option, eliminating all possible pavement, and then down select to best way to go. Example, I have all dirt north out of Globe and DBR goes up the highway for miles. I even have very difficult single track option.

 

The fact is that the whole world is going GPS tracks to communicate routes because it is free. The BDR guys use maps because that is the only thing they can sell.

 

Jerry

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Mike,

 

Could be on different pages, what kind of bike are you riding? If you are on anything larger than 550 the BDR is good route to follow. If on a Dual Sport bike, I spend days riding and scouting each possible option, eliminating all possible pavement, and then down select to best way to go. Example, I have all dirt north out of Globe and DBR goes up the highway for miles. I even have very difficult single track option.

 

The fact is that the whole world is going GPS tracks to communicate routes because it is free. The BDR guys use maps because that is the only thing they can sell.

 

Jerry

 

'07 KLR650 with Race tech suspension F&R, I ride it like a big dirt bike. It does better than it should compared to my DRZ400 and WR450, except the nastiest single track and steep, rocky down hills. Looking for a KTM 690. I've never trucked bikes anywhere, and new territory was getting too far away.

 

I did check out GPSXcnange, but I need to give something to get something and I have nothing at this point. If necessary I'll pursue it further. I like the big picture paper provides.

 

We may be more alike than I first thought, as I also like to check things out and explore, but see no need to record it, except to find my way back. GWT was my first planned route, and it was fun, mostly because it was new trying to follow a predetermined route. I've kinda gathered the AZBDR is a pretty tame route, but that's OK sometimes too.

 

Thanks, Mike

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'07 KLR650 with Race tech suspension F&R, I ride it like a big dirt bike.

 

I did check out GPSXcnange, but I need to give something to get something and I have nothing at this point. If necessary I'll pursue it further. I like the big picture paper provides.  Thanks, Mike

Mike,

 

If you are young enough and good enough the 650s can be ridden on the hard stuff. My largest bike was a TE610 (other than Triumph Desert Sled when starting) but just too much work to keep up with friends on better bikes especially when your are almost 70. Now have 525 EXC, almost the perfect bike except my CRF230 with chain saw rack for the really hard stuff. I drive 1,000 to 1,500 miles just to get to trail so it is in Van Conversion motorhome with KTM on rack on back. I still put 30,000 miles of dirt only on Husky in 6 years.

 

Read again, all my tracks are in Private Libraries where you do not need to post a file to download. I only post .gdb so you really need some GPS software with maps on our PC.

 

Ye,s in a new area I try to find paper maps, mainly MVUMs so I know what is legal and to get the big picture. Then I hand draw tracks on PC of every good looking route, then download them into GPS, then go riding. You can not believe how much faster it is to just look down at GPS to see which way to go at any given intersection.

 

If you like long point to point, check out my Mex2Can.com

 

We first laid it out in 1999 before GPS, it took forever with paper maps. Same process but highlighted paper map, then get it laminated, then go ride, and stop at every other intersection to look at map. I did GWT in less that three years with 2-3 trips a year.

 

BTW many threads on AdvRider about AZBDR.

 

Jerry

Edited by Countdown

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Mike,

 

If you are young enough and good enough the 650s can be ridden on the hard stuff. My largest bike was a TE610 (other than Triumph Desert Sled when starting) but just too much work to keep up with friends on better bikes especially when your are almost 70. Now have 525 EXC, almost the perfect bike except my CRF230 with chain saw rack for the really hard stuff. I drive 1,000 to 1,500 miles just to get to trail so it is in Van Conversion motorhome with KTM on rack on back. I still put 30,000 miles of dirt only on Husky in 6 years.

 

Read again, all my tracks are in Private Libraries where you do not need to post a file to download. I only post .gdb so you really need some GPS software with maps on our PC.

 

Ye,s in a new area I try to find paper maps, mainly MVUMs so I know what is legal and to get the big picture. Then I hand draw tracks on PC of every good looking route, then download them into GPS, then go riding. You can not believe how much faster it is to just look down at GPS to see which way to go at any given intersection.

 

If you like long point to point, check out my Mex2Can.com

 

We first laid it out in 1999 before GPS, it took forever with paper maps. Same process but highlighted paper map, then get it laminated, then go ride, and stop at every other intersection to look at map. I did GWT in less that three years with 2-3 trips a year.

 

BTW many threads on AdvRider about AZBDR.

 

Jerry

I don't know if I'm young enough or good enough but I ride solo so I'm not holding anyone back. With the DRZ or WR I rode with younger guys on every brand of 450's and had no issues. When they closed down most of, and the best of, the single track around Flagstaff many of us sold our bikes to pursue different interests. Mine was exploring Arizona, DS style. I finally recognized you on AdvRider and am understanding a little better. I'm 55, self employed, but semi-retired since 2008 since the housing crash. I think my budget may be a little smaller than yours, I chose not to afford a RV to haul my bikes around. Instead I also have a street bike and other hobbies. I'll slab long distances to get to some new territory, hell on the 606's and MT21's.

I just don't do that much preplanning, not my style yet. Maybe later.

Mike

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Got my map today, it appears to be a quality piece. Waterproof/resistant, one side is the entire state with the route. The other side is blow up of the different sections, comments, bypass alternatives and why for heavier bikes or less experienced riders. An elevation change graph is a nice touch. Covers gas, camping, hotels, required permits, etc. I've ridden ALOT on the rez and never knew I needed a permit. The map is $21, for me worth it if I ride this route. The sections I've already ridden are not difficult, but still interesting.

Due to elevation and temp. extremes probably have to do spring or fall if a single run. Otherwise do the north in summer and the south in winter.

If I decide to give it a go I'll post. Sounds like Countdown will beat me to it.

Otherwise, guess I'm done.

Mike

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Didn't have anything else to do today, so road an approximately 80 mile section from Winona to Hwy 87 (Clints Well). Was just curious, as the area is familiar but the route 75% new and wanted to see what "difficult alternate, damage possible" meant for this route if I decide to ride similar sections farther from home. The entire section was easy on the KLR. Some dirt roads, some rocky trails, but no major elevation changes. No idea what it would be like on a 500#+ adventure bike, but good on a dual sport. Enough to keep it interesting. Lot's of elk and antelope, and only ran across 1 truck and 3 bikes near the exit point. May try the section through Young once it cools down and find out what "expert only" means.

 

Mike

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