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sirthumpalot

The TPS adjustment thread

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I have the pig tail tps tool has anyone else used this or is everyone using BDS

Edited by ktmxcw250

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Someone please post when they've found a way to get that TPS cover off

See my post above. You basically have to swing the sub-frame up out of the way and pull the throttle body to get to that top screw. My plan is to tune with just the bottom screw cinched and put the top screw back on once I have it where I want it. Edited by RallyMoto

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I have the pig tail tps tool has anyone else used this or is everyone using BDS

 

The tool from TPSTool.com works great.  I'll steal a photo from @RallyMoto post above: 

 

 

post-203515-0-65067000-1484181888.jpg

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Not sure if you have seen this video for the TPS Adjust on a 2017 EXC, but it may help someone.

Note: I'm not endorsing either TPS tool, just want to show one way of getting to the TPS and make note that now the Idle adjust and TPS are linked.

https://youtu.be/8EijN6sRIII

After watching this video I'm sure glad I have a 2016. I was able to adjust my tps and do a remap with no trouble at all. Bike runs a lot better (the way it should) with my aftermarket exhaust. All that hassle on a 2017 to do simple tps adjustment and who knows about mapping? Of course I simply don't trust that best dual sport guy since I know someone who bought his $100 tps black box and it showed exactly the same as the tps tool every time on our 2016's. I think he's a good salesman. I also had the dealer remap my bike and they set my tps at .60 with there dealer tool. When I got home I double checked their setting and it showed .599 on my multimeter with the tps tool. Edited by Deepseadan
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@sirthumpalot: I stand corrected. The TPS definitely pivots along the two slots.

For those tuning an FE501/450, I recommend leaving the top screw slightly loose for fine tuning and setting it with the bottom screw. Once you get it where you like it, you can pull the throttle body and snug the top one, too. I can't get the TB to rotate far enough with the massive wiring harness, so that's what I came up with. Anyone come up with a better procedure I'd love to hear it.

Edited by RallyMoto
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Perhaps I missed it in this thread, but any idea on where the connector would be on 2017 Husqvarna FC 450? I've looked and can't seem to find it?!!! I'd like to think I'm some-what mechanically inclined, but can't seem to find the darn thing... Any advice or pics would be a huge help!

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Perhaps I missed it in this thread, but any idea on where the connector would be on 2017 Husqvarna FC 450? I've looked and can't seem to find it?!!! I'd like to think I'm some-what mechanically inclined, but can't seem to find the darn thing... Any advice or pics would be a huge help!

Not sure if the FCs are the same as the FE, but I believe they are for 2017... I brought my new FE501 home yesterday and had a look. The TPS is located behind a black cover now directly on the side of the throttle body. It seems that in order to remove the cover and expose the plug, you have to loosen and rotate the throttle body. I haven't done it yet, as I'm waiting to put an exhaust and plug the emissions first, but you can find some more info. over in the "2017 FE501 arrived" thread. The locations for TPS are the same on the whole range of FE, and I think its the same on the FCs. If I get a chance to take it apart tonight, I will post some pics.

 

Also, word from the other thread is that the 2017s are using Model 3 of the TPStool. I will verify and post when I get a chance.

 

EDIT

 

This vid does a decent job of showing the location, though it looks just a little different than my husky.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EijN6sRIII&feature=youtu.be

Edited by FortunateJon

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That video just showed a major change, the last 5 years the exc throttle body had a separate idle circuit, idle did not effect the tps setting, the new throttle body, idle settings now effect the tps setting, as idle adjustment now effts the buttler fly, where it didn't on previous year models.  Not to mention how much more difficult it is to check.

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The video is useful for showing you how to access the TPS, but he obviously doesn't have a grasp for what he's trying to explain.  Firstly the TPSTool.com tool works fantastic on the new bikes, just like it did on the earlier bikes.  He spends so much time talking ill about the TPSTool, it must be cutting into his sales a great deal.  Reading through the posts above verify that the TPSTool.com tool works great, especially @Deepseadan's post which pretty much sums it up.  

 

Secondly the assertion that increasing the idle is making the bike richer because the TPS voltage is increasing is just plain wrong.  On the new throttle bodies, adjusting the idle actually moves the throttle plate, and when the throttle plate moves the TPS voltage changes.  So increasing the idle will make the TPS voltage go up because the throttle is opening.  The SX and XC-F models have been like this for a while.  For fun, connect your TPSTool.com tool and open the throttle. The voltage will shoot up well over 4v at full throttle.  Reading the voltage is how the ECU knows the position of the throttle. ;)   

 

For best result; connect your TPSTool.com tool and take a reading.  Move it up by 0.02v and test.  If it's better, keep increasing by 0.02v as long as you see improvement.  If it's worse, go down by 0.02v and test. You'll find the best setting quickly.  To keep things simple; don't play with both the idle and the TPS setting at the same time.  Adjust one, then the other.  

 

And please spread the word that the TPSTool.com tool works great on the 2017 bikes, just like it did on the earlier models!    :ride:

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I absolutely agree with sirthumpalot. I just spent the day with his tool on my 2017 FE501. For reference I ended up at.76 and stock setting was.61. I drilled a few 1" holes in the top of the airbox, and have an FMF RCT 4.1 on for an idea of how much air I'm flowing. I'm just a hair rich right now, but I'll have the FC450 intake boot on Tuesday and that extra flow should lean it out that extra little bit. Or I'll tweek it.

Curious side note for me. My idle didn't really change enough to mess with it. I was expecting it to, but it's right about where it was when I started, oddly enough. Be curious to see if others experience the same.

This bike rips now! Pulls hard everywhere. No longer anemic!

IMG_3119.JPG

IMG_3120.JPG

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The video is useful for showing you how to access the TPS, but he obviously doesn't have a grasp for what he's trying to explain.  Firstly the TPSTool.com tool works fantastic on the new bikes, just like it did on the earlier bikes.  He spends so much time talking ill about the TPSTool, it must be cutting into his sales a great deal.  Reading through the posts above verify that the TPSTool.com tool works great, especially @Deepseadan's post which pretty much sums it up.  

 

Secondly the assertion that increasing the idle is making the bike richer because the TPS voltage is increasing is just plain wrong.  On the new throttle bodies, adjusting the idle actually moves the throttle plate, and when the throttle plate moves the TPS voltage changes.  So increasing the idle will make the TPS voltage go up because the throttle is opening.  The SX and XC-F models have been like this for a while.  For fun, connect your TPSTool.com tool and open the throttle. The voltage will shoot up well over 4v at full throttle.  Reading the voltage is how the ECU knows the position of the throttle. ;)   

 

For best result; connect your TPSTool.com tool and take a reading.  Move it up by 0.02v and test.  If it's better, keep increasing by 0.02v as long as you see improvement.  If it's worse, go down by 0.02v and test. You'll find the best setting quickly.  To keep things simple; don't play with both the idle and the TPS setting at the same time.  Adjust one, then the other.  

 

And please spread the word that the TPSTool.com tool works great on the 2017 bikes, just like it did on the earlier models!    :ride:

I agree, I'm not a fan of this guy, as he spends 90% of his videos trying to sell his products. And as an Electronics Tech by trade, I also agree with your assessment about the adjustment process. While he is correct in that you may see fluctuations in the initial voltage reading between hook ups, it's the change in value that matters. Adjust it, test it. If its not good enough, hook it back up and adjust again by another similar margin. It doesn't matter if it is being adjusted from .65 to .67, or .68 to .70, it's the same shit.

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I absolutely agree with sirthumpalot. I just spent the day with his tool on my 2017 FE501. For reference I ended up at.76 and stock setting was.61. I drilled a few 1" holes in the top of the airbox, and have an FMF RCT 4.1 on for an idea of how much air I'm flowing. I'm just a hair rich right now, but I'll have the FC450 intake boot on Tuesday and that extra flow should lean it out that extra little bit. Or I'll tweek it.

Curious side note for me. My idle didn't really change enough to mess with it. I was expecting it to, but it's right about where it was when I started, oddly enough. Be curious to see if others experience the same.

This bike rips now! Pulls hard everywhere. No longer anemic!

Good to hear rally. How did you go about accessing the plug? Did you just loosen the clamp for the throttle body and rotate it CC? Or did you have to disconnect everything completely?

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Good to hear rally. How did you go about accessing the plug? Did you just loosen the clamp for the throttle body and rotate it CC? Or did you have to disconnect everything completely?

I had to pivot the sub-frame and pull the throttle body. The massive wiring harness won't let me pivot far enough to get to the upper screw like on the off-road bikes. Read my post a couple pages ago for the full break-down.

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I absolutely agree with sirthumpalot. I just spent the day with his tool on my 2017 FE501. For reference I ended up at.76 and stock setting was.61. I drilled a few 1" holes in the top of the airbox, and have an FMF RCT 4.1 on for an idea of how much air I'm flowing. I'm just a hair rich right now, but I'll have the FC450 intake boot on Tuesday and that extra flow should lean it out that extra little bit. Or I'll tweek it.

Curious side note for me. My idle didn't really change enough to mess with it. I was expecting it to, but it's right about where it was when I started, oddly enough. Be curious to see if others experience the same.

This bike rips now! Pulls hard everywhere. No longer anemic!

Hey rally, be careful not to lean out your bike to much with a muffler and other mods without a remap to increase fueling. That 4.1 really flows a lot more air as I'm sure you notice in the top end. A lot of people think a simple adjust of the tps will tweak or richen up the bike enough to make it right. That's not true. The main benefit of adjusting the tps is to reduce backfire on decel and help with flame outs. Both of those occur at little to no throttle. So basically your tps adjustment affects about the 0-1/4 throttle range. As stated earlier by sirthumplot twisting the throttle goes from .610 to over 4.0. Your adjustment you made basically increased the tps by .15 along the entire throttle range which is nothing when you get to the 3.5 - 4.0 range (fifteen hundredths compared 4.0). It can be confusing unless you think of it this way.

When you remap you get the correct map on your ecu for you bike and it's accessories, basically like a rejet on a carb. The new map will increase fuel over the entire throttle range, including the full throttle range where you need it for the 4.1. You on the other hand increased air in and really increased exhaust out, but left the fuel injection nearly the same.

I've been there and done that on my 16' ktm 500 exc with my 4.1 fmf titanium muffler and the remap is a game changer. You can feel the bike enjoying the extra fuel when it's needed. So be cautious until remaps are figured out on your 17.

Last the tps is a great way to fix decel pops and flameouts on a fully stock bike or desmogged bike. The tps tool is the way to go and I feel a must to see where you are. When I remapped I found .599 to be the best, where before .662 was better.

Edited by Deepseadan
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The video is useful for showing you how to access the TPS, but he obviously doesn't have a grasp for what he's trying to explain. Firstly the TPSTool.com tool works fantastic on the new bikes, just like it did on the earlier bikes. He spends so much time talking ill about the TPSTool, it must be cutting into his sales a great deal. Reading through the posts above verify that the TPSTool.com tool works great, especially @Deepseadan's post which pretty much sums it up.

Secondly the assertion that increasing the idle is making the bike richer because the TPS voltage is increasing is just plain wrong. On the new throttle bodies, adjusting the idle actually moves the throttle plate, and when the throttle plate moves the TPS voltage changes. So increasing the idle will make the TPS voltage go up because the throttle is opening. The SX and XC-F models have been like this for a while. For fun, connect your TPSTool.com tool and open the throttle. The voltage will shoot up well over 4v at full throttle. Reading the voltage is how the ECU knows the position of the throttle. ;)

For best result; connect your TPSTool.com tool and take a reading. Move it up by 0.02v and test. If it's better, keep increasing by 0.02v as long as you see improvement. If it's worse, go down by 0.02v and test. You'll find the best setting quickly. To keep things simple; don't play with both the idle and the TPS setting at the same time. Adjust one, then the other.

And please spread the word that the TPSTool.com tool works great on the 2017 bikes, just like it did on the earlier models! :ride:

One more reason I really prefer the tps tool over the black box tps tuner from bds is the black box one only shows hundredths or .00. Most simple multimeters show thousandths or .000 which allows you to know if your closer to .600 or .610. I could feel a slight difference when my tps was at .599 compared to .609 and the magic number was .599.

To me price wasn't an issue, I would rather spend more on an item if it was superior. However, the tps tool is actually superior to me since I can be more accurate to the thousandth with a multimeter.

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Might be a dumb question as I don't have 1st hand knowledge of the '17's, but with so much required now to get to the TPS, can it just be connected and left in place?

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Might be a dumb question as I don't have 1st hand knowledge of the '17's, but with so much required now to get to the TPS, can it just be connected and left in place?

 

That's not a dumb question at all, I'm glad you asked it!  My official response is no, you should disconnect it before riding.  The TPSTool was designed and intended to be used for tuning in the garage.  It was not designed or intended for use while riding, where safety is a concern.  That's my best attempt at lawyer speak, how did I do?   ;)   

 

Basically if  one of the open connectors shorts, or if something snags the TPSTool and yanks the wires, etc..  anything that disrupts the signal between the TPS and ECU can cause the motor to run erratic or stall, which could be a real safety issue if you're in a technical section (whoops, jumps, etc..) or in traffic.  

 

If you want to putt up and down your driveway, or around your backyard where a sudden stall won't be a safety issue, then it's fine to leave it installed.  But before a real ride or a ride in traffic, please disconnect it.    :thumbsup:

Edited by sirthumpalot
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Hey Sirthumpsalot, along the same line of questioning, what's your opinion on leaving the cover off completely? I mean it doesn't provide an water proofing, and there are other similar connections that are exposed. I feel like it's there solely to make the adjustment more difficult..

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Hey Sirthumpsalot, along the same line of questioning, what's your opinion on leaving the cover off completely? I mean it doesn't provide an water proofing, and there are other similar connections that are exposed. I feel like it's there solely to make the adjustment more difficult..

That's what I was wondering? Ktm probably reads this thread like the rest of us and figured making it more difficult to adjust the tps may slow down the average owner who isn't very mechanical inclined.

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