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The TPS adjustment thread


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Got a 2015 350 xcfw with euro map. No sure where to start with TPS voltage?

 

Starting anywhere between 0.60v and 0.64v is OK.  Start going up either 0.02v or 0.01v (if your hand is steady enough) at a time testing in-between.  Keep going up as long as you see improvement.  If it gets worse then go down instead of up.  You should find the best setting quickly.  We're finding that the "best" setting varies a little bit bike to bike, but most people land in the same general range. 

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Is the sensor affected by wear?  Should I be checking mine for accuracy after a certain amount of hours?

 

I haven't checked mine in 100+ hours and I think there's a bit more deceleration pop than there used to be, but it could all be in my head. 

If the mechanical mechanism , like the throttle stop wore a spot , I suppose it could change the setting .  But once tight and set, it holds very well, Ive never noticed any drift at all, during my post 20,000 miles 400 hour.

 

Probably the biggest thing is people don't get it tight , or test it by popping the throttle open and closed about ten times, after an adjustment to ensure where its holding.

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  • 1 month later...

Check out this blog, he's got  a really sweet 500exc adventure build going on.  As of this writing, the TPSTool.com tool is on top of his blog, hopefully he'll have some results to share soon.  But check out his blog, really cool adventures! 

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/therollinghobo/

 

http://therollinghobo.com/2016/12/tps-tool.html

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It only change timing not fuel.

 

Pretty sure the TPS changes the interpretation of where the throttle is in it's initial opening.  So when you advance the TPS you are telling the ECU the throttle is open father than it is, so the ECU gives more fuel to compensate. 

Timing is controlled via the ECU by mapping changes. 

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It only change timing not fuel.

 

On a fuel injected bike adjusting the TPS will change both fueling and timing, though it's the fueling change that you notice most.  As described above, the ECU simply thinks you have the throttle open a little more (or less) and adjusts the fuel accordingly.  

 

On a carbureted bike it changes only the timing.  Apparently this makes a very noticeable difference on the big adventure bikes that are carbureted.  

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Did anything change? For example, did you change the exhaust? Some changes require adjustments to the fuel map.

If everything is the same, then the problem most likely isn't tuning, but something that has gone wrong. My guesses would be a clogged fuel filter (the one in the gas line), low fuel pressure (check your fuel pump) or an injector that needs to be cleaned. If those don't solve it then start a thread about a bog that just started and I'm sure you'll get to the bottom of it quickly. 🙂

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