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Floating ground question

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I'm converting my dirt bike to be street legal. I floated the ground from the stator to the regulator rectifier into the battery . My question is do you have to keep the ground system floating throughout the entire system after the 12 volt battery, or can you ground out to the frame anywhere after the battery without frying something. I'm just worried about frying anything by grounding out to the frame like a normal 12 volt system.

If I'm thinking about it correctly the floating ground gets converted by the regulator rectifier to a normal ground once it leaves the rectifier and hits the battery. So in theory the ground has changed to a normal 12 volt ground once it passes through the battery. If you grounded the frame anywhere after the battery it should be okay .

Sorry you start confuse yourself wiring up a complete system from scratch if you're not used to doing it very often.

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"Floating the ground" in the stator ... doesn't mean you don't have a frame ground.

 

There's usually a few windings for charging the DC battery, and a few windings for lights (that can be run off AC, which lets you use a smaller/cheaper rectifier since you don't need DC power for that).  Floating the ground combines the charger winding and the lights winding into one, which lets you all that into DC power, then you move the lights to DC which is more efficient. 

 

DC (negative) output from the larger reg/rect still goes to the frame, and the frame is your system's DC ground.

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Ground is not actually the correct term for your question.

 

Most motorcycles use actual wire for the "return" from all small loads after the full wave rectifier/regulator (converts AC to DC) back to the battery. It really doesn't matter if this system is connected to chassis or not. EXCEPT for an electric start system which always uses the Chassis for the return from the starter back to the battery so the negative of the battery must be connected to Chassis or at least the engine.

 

The one rule is that you can not connect one side of the stator to chassis and also the negative side after the rectifier/regulator.

 

Although the term "ground" is used a lot on isolated vehicles, it really only refers to an Earth connection of AC power systems.

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