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WR250r - highly interested!

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Hey everyone I have a couple question about the WR250r! I prefer answers from those who have/had one or know a lot about them. I want know to how far can the cylinder be bored over. I was looking at getting an Athena top end kit. I know that takes it to a 280cc, but can I go over that to a 300? Meaning will the cylinder they give me with the kit be able to go over 280cc. I was told I can buy a crank for the extra 20cc's. It's not a huge deal, I just want more top end considering the WR250r only hits 85 mph(137 kph) and I want to be pushing at least triple digits. Now I heard of the WR450r, but that's not street legal. For my state, the factory title must state that the bike is street legal before it can run on the blacktop. I would happy with a 450, but it's just not going to happen, sadly. Another thing I want to know, will a YZ racing suspension work on a WR. I want to keep it street legal so if I want to go ride a track, all I have to do it ride there. Now I was told about having the forks "revalved"? I never heard of doing this. I recently sold my Yamaha warrior so I can switch over to dirt bikes. I want an enduro bike. Not a 90% on rode 10% off. I will be track riding if the suspension can handle it, and hitting the trials with my friends.

Give me some info guys! Really appreciate it!

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1397529380.535481.jpg

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The WR250R is nothing like either the YZ250F or WR250F.  I have never seen anything concrete on a WR450R, just some internet rumors.  The WRR is a completely different beast, and pretty much nothing from the YZF/WRF will bolt on without some additional mods.  There are a lot of bits that you can swap between the YZF and WRF, but not with the WRR.

 

The suspension is fine for street and light trail riding, but you have to remember that the bike weighs over 300lbs, so taking it to a track and trying to ride it aggressively is only going to thrash the stock suspension.  Of course you can have a good suspension shop go through it for you, but they will be limited as to what they can accomplish.  The suspension on the WRR is no where near the league of the YZF/WRF.  Is it a dual sport setup, not a competition setup.

 

I have the stock engine, and have clocked just over 90mph before (measured by GPS), so the stock engine and gearing will get you pretty close to your goal of 100mph (why you would want to go that fast I cannot fathom).  Getting the Athena big bore kit and programmer and a few other free/cheap mods and you will have enough power to do anything you want.  I doubt that you can bore out either the stock or big bore jug to get to 300cc.  But hey, with enough money you can get an engine builder to do just about anything.

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Hey everyone I have a couple question about the WR250r! I prefer answers from those who have/had one or know a lot about them. I want know to how far can the cylinder be bored over. I was looking at getting an Athena top end kit. I know that takes it to a 280cc, but can I go over that to a 300? Meaning will the cylinder they give me with the kit be able to go over 280cc. I was told I can buy a crank for the extra 20cc's. It's not a huge deal, I just want more top end considering the WR250r only hits 85 mph(137 kph) and I want to be pushing at least triple digits. Now I heard of the WR450r, but that's not street legal. For my state, the factory title must state that the bike is street legal before it can run on the blacktop. I would happy with a 450, but it's just not going to happen, sadly. Another thing I want to know, will a YZ racing suspension work on a WR. I want to keep it street legal so if I want to go ride a track, all I have to do it ride there. Now I was told about having the forks "revalved"? I never heard of doing this. I recently sold my Yamaha warrior so I can switch over to dirt bikes. I want an enduro bike. Not a 90% on rode 10% off. I will be track riding if the suspension can handle it, and hitting the trials with my friends.

Give me some info guys! Really appreciate it!

attachicon.gifImageUploadedByThumper Talk1397529380.535481.jpg

Sent from my iPhone

Athena kit is 290cc not 280cc.  Thumper Racing has the 280cc kit.  Many prefer the TR kit as the piston is much lighter which means less reciprocating mass and vibration and, theoretically, better longevity.  If you do a stroker with the TR kit you end up with 306cc's I believe.

 

Don't hold your breath on a WR450R.  US emission reg's make that one very problematic for team blue.

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I'm not looking to turn a trail bike into a super fast machine. I just want a all-around bike. I just want to be hitting triple digits so I can keep up with my friends on the street bikes like the 600's and everything up. How much would if cost to revalve the forks? And I'd probably have to same to the rear. I was considering changing the gearing and/or the sprockets too for more top-end. Slows you down a little in the lower gears.

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I just want to be hitting triple digits so I can keep up with my friends on the street bikes like the 600's and everything up.  <---Not going to happen, at least not without spending a TON of money on mods.  You would be better off getting a 600/650 to start with.  The WR250R/X engine is a great engine for economy and basic transportation.  It is not a hi-perf power plant, and you are already giving up 350cc of punch to your buddies on 600s.  If they are riding Ninja 600s or R6s, there is nothing you can do to keep up with them on the street with the WR250R as your starting point.

 

How much would if cost to revalve the forks? And I'd probably have to same to the rear.   <---You need to contact some suspension shops and see what they recommend and charge.  There are hundreds of places out there, and they all have different price lists for their services.  You can expect to pay somewhere north of $250 for the front and rear just in shipping and basic labor costs.  Add springs and any other parts and you can go from there.

 

I was considering changing the gearing and/or the sprockets too for more top-end. Slows you down a little in the lower gears.   <---Changing the sprockets will alter your final drive ratio.  I am assuming that is what you are wanting to do.  You cannot change the gearing (internal transmission ratios) without a TON of money as you would have to have new gears cut.  Definitely not worth it IMHO.  Changing your sprockets won't do anything to add to your "top-end".  You can change the sprockets and alter the low-speed characteristics, or change the potential top-speed but neither will do anything to increase your "top-end" which usually refers to the engine's power output at the higher RPMs.
 

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Forget about "wanting to push triple-digit speeds to keep up with my buddies on CBR-600RRs" because the WR-250R makes a fraction of that kind of power.

It will hit 80-something (some claim low 90s), but will take much longer than a YZF-R6 or Gixxer to get there.

 

I believe you're daydreaming.

 

Plus, the WR-250R already comes stock with mega-tall gearing straight off the showroom that is really too tall for the bike (guys gear this bike down, not up), and gearing it taller, still, will turn 6th gear into something ridiculously tall and ruin off-road riding.

 

My advice:

Use the bike with the intent it conveys by just looking at it - it's a decent dual-purpose bike that rides just fine down the street and just fine on the trails, not a 600 sport bike with 100 horsepower or a YZ for the motocross track.

Revalving the suspension will make the bike feel better (assuming you have somebody good do it), but it will in no way make it a YZ.

If you want to just RIDE (not race or lap at race-like pace) on a track, well, fine.

You could do that on a lot of bikes.

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