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2014 KTM 150sx

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Going to pickup my brand new 150sx saturday. It's my second dirt bike but it's been a while since I've owned one and I've never owned a two stroke.. Any suggestions? I plan to baby her :D

 

 

and by baby I mean maintenance and such... No such thing as babying a 2 stroke in my books.

Edited by 2stroke_FTW

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I got my 14' 150sx about 2 months ago.  It's better then any other bike I've owned and I've had quite a few KTM two strokes.  I would recommend getting an after market exhaust like FMF.  It really increases the mid range power without loosing any top end.  Mine pulls hard from mid all the way through.  My 11' 150sx with stock exhaust didn't have any where near the mid range this bike has.  Gear it down a little, I went with a 50 tooth sprocket on the back, stock is 48.  Put a motion pro throttle cable on it just to be safe.  Ditch the front Dunlop MX51 tire if you have the money.  I have twisted engineering handlebars which helps reduce engine vibration and arm pump.  Also check into the Midwest Mountain clutch lever.  Have fun!! its a kick ass bike!

Edited by maxamillion125

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Wow man thanks for all of that! I never raced or anything before but now I am considering it because of the brand new bike. Once again thanks a lot!

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Congrats, you chose what's often considered the most fun bike to ride/own, and worthy of being a capable race machine as well. Enjoy the ear to ear grin every time you kick it over.

 

Here's my pre-flight list of tweaks and mods

  • Place two washers in between the front fender and the lower triple clamp on the two holes closet to the frame, this will prevent the back of the front fender from chaffing on the frame
  • Set your sag to 108-110mm
  • Consider taking out 10-15cc's of oil in the forks. The WP forks are harsh in the mid stroke and will beat you up; lowering the oil lessens this a bit. Ride and feel
  • Move the gear shifter lever up one notch, all KTM's come with the lever 1 notch too low for most riders (prevents inadvertent shifts which can be a real safety concern)
  • Lower the rear brake lever and the engagement point almost as low as you can go, that way you won't continually apply the rear brake by accident (again, a real safety issue)
  • Certainly consider the motion pro throttle cable replacement (Standard length or 5" extended and route behind the bars). The motion pro cable screws into the throttle housing a prevents accidental whiskey throttle if they cable is tugged on. (I use the standard length motion pro and retain the stock routing, personal preference)
  • Disassemble the steering stem, linkage t-bone, and swingarm and grease the bearings up adequately (comes lightly greased and with low end lube)
  • Def consider gearing the bike up some, at least one tooth. You should read this thread on gearing for some insight. I ended up trying the 13/51 combo and am extremely happy with it. Prior to the gearing change, I somewhat often ended dropping into 1st gear on some slow corners and then caught neutral more often than I would like to admit. By moving to 13/51, you gear the bike much lower so that you always ride in 3rd, 4th, 5th, and maybe 6th if you are riding an insanely fast track. You should never ride in 1st gear anyhow, other than in the pits. By gearing lower you stay in the heart of the power much easier and never have to be concerned about finding neutral by accident. To each his own on gearing, but I am a believer after being skeptical at first.
  • Replace the stock sprocket bolts. This is an absolute "must" as the stock bolts will loosen up within just a couple of hours and will always come loose. These Supersprox bolts are trick looking and work great!
  • Run 40-50:1 premix with good quality oil. If available in your area, only run ethanol free gas as well for better performance and to avoid all the BS with Ethanol gas. You can find gas stations that sell Ethanol Free at http://pure-gas.org/
  • Use Rotella 15x-40 (Walmart) in the gearbox, or the 15w50 as the manual calls for. Rotella works amazingly well and is recommended/proven by scores of experienced KTM owners. 15w-50 Motorex cost 4x as much and I find the Rotella has a slight advantage in shifting smoothness.
  • Like Maxamillion suggested, rid yourself of the stock meat soon after. I personally love the Michelin S12 XC upfront and the Michelin MS3 on the rear and run them at 10.5lbs of pressure. This tire combo works incredibly well across a wide array of conditions. I've tried various Kenda, Dunlops, & Bridestones (but not yet the 430 404 combo) and I find the Michelins to be great all around tires
  • Whenever changing the air filter, be super diligent to ensure that the filter cage is seated entirely, especially on the backside. Always run your fingers around the circumference of the cage to ensure a snug fit. It just takes one f-up to introduce dirt and ruin a perfectly good motor.
  • I run a bead of silicon around the left side plastic ignition cover to prevent sand and dirt to slip past the cover. The cover simply does not seal well and you will get plenty of grime in there over time if you don't
  • Get an aftermarket exhaust to boost the ponies if you want to harness the full potential. Both FMF and Pro Circuit make great 2 stroke pipes, though it seems the Pro Circuit header pipe is a little more robust by the mounts. Then add on a shorty silencer and you'll have one sweet sounding 2 banger

@Maxamillion: The 2014 engine is no different than the 2011 motor with the exception of the airboot, which actually favors the 2011 by providing better airflow and in turn slightly more HP. No tranny or engine changes have been made between these model years and the 2011 is everything the 2014 is in terms of motor, plus 5 lbs less. I don't know why you feel the 2014 is quicker in the mid range, other than your 2011 was clapped out or not jetted properly.

 

Enjoy prepping and getting to know your new edition. Have a blast, ride safe, and report back

Edited by tk2stroke

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Some great info in the posts above.  

 

My standard small bore two stroke advice: Jet for 32:1 and run any name brand oil (no need for anything fancy).  Have at least 2 air filters so you can always keep a clean one in (seated properly).  Any 10w40 motor oil works fine in the gearbox, but just change it often.  Do these things and you bike will last for years with only regular top-end changes.

 

Regarding the chassis, check bearings for grease BEFORE you ride and get dirt everywhere.  Of course check for nut and bolt tightness after the first few rides.  Every bike seems to have something that gets loose, and don't forget spokes!

 

DON"T spend a cent on aftermarket parts until you fully explore the stock settings for suspension, powervalve, etc.  A lot of people on these sites seem to think that the engineers that designed their bike don't know anything, and they start throwing all kinds of money at the bike, ending up with a hodgepodge of parts that don't work well at all.  Fully explore the bike as designed.  

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All good info here, but I'd ride it for a bit before changing things out. A lot of guys hate the Dunlops, I'm fine with them and will change them in another month or so. I rode all last year with stock gearing and the stock pipe/silencer combo and felt I had a great bike as it was. Since I wore the chain and sprockets out I replaced and went 13/50 which I agree is a better ratio for this bike, that combined with a PC platinum pipe and R-304 shorty made quite a big difference for me. I wouldn't know that if I hadn't spent a year on it stock.

Enjoy it in stock form for a while before you change things IMO. My 13 was great right from the dealership in stock form, and man are they fun to ride.

I would tear down and grease and check all tourque. I found very little grease in the linkage and steering head and axles on my bike. It's worth the time it takes.

I've run Amsoil Interceptor at 40-1 since new with great results. No fouling, no spooge. Follow the jetting chart in the manual, it's been spot on for me so far.

Congrats on the new bike!!

Edited by poldies4

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Congrats, you chose what's often considered the most fun bike to ride/own, and worthy of being a capable race machine as well. Enjoy the ear to ear grin every time you kick it over.

 

Here's my pre-flight list of tweaks and mods

  • Place two washers in between the front fender and the lower triple clamp on the two holes closet to the frame, this will prevent the back of the front fender from chaffing on the frame
  • Set your sag to 108-110mm
  • Consider taking out 10-15cc's of oil in the forks. The WP forks are harsh in the mid stroke and will beat you up; lowering the oil lessens this a bit. Ride and feel
  • Move the gear shifter lever up one notch, all KTM's come with the lever 1 notch too low for most riders (prevents inadvertent shifts which can be a real safety concern)
  • Lower the rear brake lever and the engagement point almost as low as you can go, that way you won't continually apply the rear brake by accident (again, a real safety issue)
  • Certainly consider the motion pro throttle cable replacement (Standard length or 5" extended and route behind the bars). The motion pro cable screws into the throttle housing a prevents accidental whiskey throttle if they cable is tugged on. (I use the standard length motion pro and retain the stock routing, personal preference)
  • Disassemble the steering stem, linkage t-bone, and swingarm and grease the bearings up adequately (comes lightly greased and with low end lube)
  • Def consider gearing the bike up some, at least one tooth. You should read this thread on gearing for some insight. I ended up trying the 13/51 combo and am extremely happy with it. Prior to the gearing change, I somewhat often ended dropping into 1st gear on some slow corners and then caught neutral more often than I would like to admit. By moving to 13/51, you gear the bike much lower so that you always ride in 3rd, 4th, 5th, and maybe 6th if you are riding an insanely fast track. You should never ride in 1st gear anyhow, other than in the pits. By gearing lower you stay in the heart of the power much easier and never have to be concerned about finding neutral by accident. To each his own on gearing, but I am a believer after being skeptical at first.
  • Replace the stock sprocket bolts. This is an absolute "must" as the stock bolts will loosen up within just a couple of hours and will always come loose. These Supersprox bolts are trick looking and work great!
  • Run 40-50:1 premix with good quality oil. If available in your area, only run ethanol free gas as well for better performance and to avoid all the BS with Ethanol gas. You can find gas stations that sell Ethanol Free at http://pure-gas.org/
  • Use Rotella 15x-40 (Walmart) in the gearbox, or the 15w50 as the manual calls for. Rotella works amazingly well and is recommended/proven by scores of experienced KTM owners. 15w-50 Motorex cost 4x as much and I find the Rotella has a slight advantage in shifting smoothness.
  • Like Maxamillion suggested, rid yourself of the stock meat soon after. I personally love the Michelin S12 XC upfront and the Michelin MS3 on the rear and run them at 10.5lbs of pressure. This tire combo works incredibly well across a wide array of conditions. I've tried various Kenda, Dunlops, & Bridestones (but not yet the 430 404 combo) and I find the Michelins to be great all around tires
  • Whenever changing the air filter, be super diligent to ensure that the filter cage is seated entirely, especially on the backside. Always run your fingers around the circumference of the cage to ensure a snug fit. It just takes one f-up to introduce dirt and ruin a perfectly good motor.
  • I run a bead of silicon around the left side plastic ignition cover to prevent sand and dirt to slip past the cover. The cover simply does not seal well and you will get plenty of grime in there over time if you don't
  • Get an aftermarket exhaust to boost the ponies if you want to harness the full potential. Both FMF and Pro Circuit make great 2 stroke pipes, though it seems the Pro Circuit header pipe is a little more robust by the mounts. Then add on a shorty silencer and you'll have one sweet sounding 2 banger

@Maxamillion: The 2014 engine is no different than the 2011 motor with the exception of the airboot, which actually favors the 2011 by providing better airflow and in turn slightly more HP. No tranny or engine changes have been made between these model years and the 2011 is everything the 2014 is in terms of motor, plus 5 lbs less. I don't know why you feel the 2014 is quicker in the mid range, other than your 2011 was clapped out or not jetted properly.

 

Enjoy prepping and getting to know your new edition. Have a blast, ride safe, and report back

 

Great post tons of good info in there!!  My 2011 had the stock exhaust and about 30 hrs on it when I bought it.  My 2014 with the full FMF exhaust pulls noticeably harder in mid range.  It might be a combination of the fmf exhaust, different reeds and of course new bike, I'm not sure but it definitely pulls harder in mid-range.  Both bikes were jetted properly.   Oh by the way I just put a Rekluse exp 3.0 on it this week!! I'll give you guys some feedback after a couple rides.

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Wow you guys are awesome, thank you so much for all the info! I will post pics of the bike and everything asap :D

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All good advice here.  For me, the gearing change (to 13f, 50r IIRC) was a must based on the tracks I ride.  I found 100mm of sag to be ideal.  I also needed to change out the rear and front springs because I weigh 185 lbs with no gear.  I went 4 to 6 clicks softer than the factory comp & rebound recommendations and found it made a big difference - felt much less harsh.  I don't take massive jumps but ride somewhat aggressively otherwise and the bike is very smooth feeling now.

 

I would definitely recommend using the jetting chart towards the back of the manual.  If you follow the recommendations for temperature and altitude, you will get very close.  I did find that a notch or two richer on the needle jet was necessary at times.  Track your changes so you know what works for what temps, etc.

 

Congrats on the bike and enjoy - it is absolutely the most stupid fun bike I've owned!  You can't help but smile when riding it :)

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Quick question: I do not need to run 98 octane gas do I? I mean seriously, that stuff is hard to get and crazy expensive.

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Quick question: I do not need to run 98 octane gas do I? I mean seriously, that stuff is hard to get and crazy expensive.

No, I run 93 as it's the highest octane pump fuel I can get. You'll be fine with 91 or 93.

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Also, I am planning on doing offroad and trail riding as well... The sx is okay for that too right?

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I've ridden track, trail and tight woods on mine with no issues. For me it's been a good do all bike.

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My dealer had a new 13 150sx sitting there for over a year.  I recently sold my 11 350sxf and my 13 300exc and was looking for a MX bike, and I got a very good deal on the 150, which I bought without ever riding it, and the last small 2-stroke I rode was way back in the early 90s.

 

This thing is fun!  It is a seriously fast bike if you keep it on the pipe, and I was immediately comfortable on it, after adjusting the sag and the clickers.  I broke it in and raced it last weekend on a sand track.  The only changes I made for the race were a 50T rear sprocket, and a GPR damper.  In both motos, I got in 2nd place to the first turn, both times behind a 14 KTM250sxf, but ahead of all the jap 250F´s.  Both times I started in 2nd gear, which is amazing considering that some 250Fs won´t pull 2nd on the start.  

 

I´m going to try an Ohlins TTX shock I had on my 350 once I get the right spring for it.  With the stock 48N/mm spring, in order to get 100mm of race sag (I weigh 175lbs no clothes), I end up with less than 25mm static, so I´ll need a 50 or 52N/mm spring to get the right sag numbers. 

 

Has anyone tried a FMF or PC pipe/shorty silencer?  Does it give it more mid range or more overrev?  

 

Thanks!

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Has anyone tried a FMF or PC pipe/shorty silencer?  Does it give it more mid range or more overrev?  

 

Thanks!

 

Does a bear shit in the woods? The PC/Shorty silencer gives a solid boost in the midrange and shines even more up top. With the Shorty, the bike makes maximum power at 11k RPM right when you hit the limiter. The FMF or PC combo is really a must have for this bike to harness it's maximum capability during competition. $300 bucks for the full system, gotta love the 2 stroke!

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Does a bear shit in the woods? The PC/Shorty silencer gives a solid boost in the midrange and shines even more up top. With the Shorty, the bike makes maximum power at 11k RPM right when you hit the limiter. The FMF or PC combo is really a must have for this bike to harness it's maximum capability during competition. $300 bucks for the full system, gotta love the 2 stroke!

Thanks, I´ll get the PC/Shorty combo ASAP.

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Does a bear shit in the woods? The PC/Shorty silencer gives a solid boost in the midrange and shines even more up top. With the Shorty, the bike makes maximum power at 11k RPM right when you hit the limiter. The FMF or PC combo is really a must have for this bike to harness it's maximum capability during competition. $300 bucks for the full system, gotta love the 2 stroke!

+1, put the PC setup on over the winter and geared 13/50. Quite a difference from the stock set up.

I wasn't much of a believer in noticable gains from switching pipes but I'm a believer now. It revs up a lot faster and has more down low combined with the 50 tooth rear. You will likely want to jet gain if you do a pipe switch.

Edited by poldies4

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  Put a motion pro throttle cable on it just to be safe. 

I thought they had fixed the issue of the cable popping out? My bikes stock cable is fixed on both ends and can't move. My 03 on the other hand was a disaster waiting to happen. Is there another reason to switch them out?

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I thought they had fixed the issue of the cable popping out? My bikes stock cable is fixed on both ends and can't move. My 03 on the other hand was a disaster waiting to happen. Is there another reason to switch them out?

Can you take a photo, would love to see what they did to fix it?

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Can you take a photo, would love to see what they did to fix it?

I'll get one for you soon, is there a particular part you want to see? Or just how it enters the throttle housing and carb? End of the cable?

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