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Trouble with fork sagging

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Hello everyone 

have some questions for the more experienced

i have just rebuilt my front forks using new seals and dust covers as the fork seal had started to leak one one of the forks i also used 5w fork oil

I drained out the old oil which was a dark brown colour and proceeded stripping the forks 

i put the forks all back together using various guides i found on the net making the job seem relatively simple 

i then put 340ml of oil back into each fork and then set the clicker on the bottom to 9 clicks back from fully screwed in

I've put the forks back on the bike and they feel way too soft and are no where near as hard as before the rebuild wondering if anyone knows how i can harden the forks back up 

i released the air through the bleed screw once id put them back together and put the bleed screw back

Thanks 

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The post is alittle confusing because the title makes it sound like there is more static sag in the forks now than before but there are no measurements given?

Also cant tell if youve ridden the bike yet or the fork movement just seems smoother or softer when push down on the rear of the bike when its not moving?

It sounded like the fluid you drained out was extremely bad, did you drain the inner chambers as well?

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New fork oil will make the forks feel much more plush.  Are the springs correct for your weight?

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Thanks for the replies

The springs and fork setup were great before apart from the leaking seal

I have teat rode the bike since I done the seals and oil and even a light tap of the brakes makes to forks dip alot more than before on the road

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could anyone shed some light as to exactly what the top and bottom adjusters do as i might need to play with those 

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Yes they are compression and rebound adjustments....way to much to type to tell you exactly what they do

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Maybe the oil lever or viscosity was different than what you put in?

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Thanks for the response

Think I will live with it until I get a chance to try it offroad and if still not happy would swopping the oil with 10w help or should I get a stiffer spring?

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could anyone shed some light as to exactly what the top and bottom adjusters do as i might need to play with those 

 

The owners manual has quite a bit of good information about servicing and adjusting the front forks so really that would be the best place to start.

Honestly if someone doesnt know anything about adjusting the clickers I cant imagine why they would attempt to tackle the job of replacing the fork seals.

IMO you really need to read through the owners manual.

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The fork seals I found to be a relatively easy job overall and I just counted the clicks on the bottom adjuster and then set them back to the same position and havent tpuched the top ones just thought might be able to stop the fork dipping under braking a bit. I did change the front pads at the same time so that could be why it feela to dip a bit more as old pads were in bad shape

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If you went from old, brown fork oil to new oil AND it felt good with the old oil - then you definitely need to change your rebound and compression settings.  The Showa forks are incredibly adaptable with the right settings.  There are a lot of tutorials online.  Me, I take the easy way out...... set the rebound damping so that it rides nice (whatever you think of as nice) and than set the compression damping so that you just barely bottom out on your biggest hits.  Then just let the suspension do the work.

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 Here's the best advice I got:  grab a couple of hours and let the seat of your pants tell you what is going on.

 

 Find an area that you can ride over and over, both slow and fast, and hopefully with some varying terrain.

 

 Rebound is on the bottom, compression on the top.   Same for the rear shock.  Only difference there is there are two compression adjustment; low and high speed.

 

 First, go all the way in with everything.   When you go in, only *lightly* seat the clicker when you get to the last position (don't crank it down trying to get another click).   Ride and see what it feels like.

 

 Now dial everything all the way out.  Ride again and see what it feels like.

 

 Then go all the way in on the compression and ride.

 

 Then bring the compression all the way back out and put the rebound all the way in.   Take another ride.

 

 Now bring everything to the middle, which is about eight clicks out, and go for one last ride.

 

 You now know what the bike feels like at all the extreme's.   Take notes what it feels like at each point.

 

  The other thing is before starting this, make sure your sag is set correctly in the rear, which determines the bikes overall balance.

 

Jim.

Edited by Jim Dettman

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Did you put the original springs back in? If you are over 180 lbs then you should consider switching out the springs themselves. Adjusting the compression and rebound rates is a poor mans alternative to correct spring rates.

As far as your "after rebuild doesn't feel right", I agree with others that having new oil instead of old worn out corrupted garbage oil probably caused the difference.

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