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My first DRZ. Battery going flat. 30 milliamp drain to high?

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Hi Group,

 

After a life-time of XRs I just bought my first Suzuki, a 2003 DRZ400s. New battery goes flat after a day or two. There is a 30 milliamp draw on the battery. Is that normal? If not, suggestions on where to start looking for a short?

 

Thanks, Steve

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i dont know what the normal drain is .. ive been through 3 batteries since ive had mine, finally with the last one i realized a couple of things .. for one there definitely is a drain and unless you ride quite a bit several times a week its best to pull the wires off the battery .. secondly the charging system is marginal on these things and for peak performance, which isnt much, all related connections need to be squeaky clean and perfect .. thirdly, a trickle charger that charges at .1amp or so, that you can top the battery off with imo is pretty much a must to make the battery last a good long time .. i top mine off a few hours every couple of weeks .. letting them sit in a run-down state will ruin them ..

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I just disconnected the speedometer/computer, the drain dropped to zero amps. Is there a history of problems with them, can I run the bike without it?

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The Service standard for a DRZ S is less than 1 mA 

 

If you have 30mA.. yes that exceeds the standard 

 

The Speedo does draw some wattage to keep the clock running, completely normal, and why the smallish battery should be on a battery tender if the bike will be left to sit for weeks at a time.

 

Have your battery checked.

Consider doing the "Free Power Mod"

Once you have a serviceable, charged battery do the charging system diagnostics to confirm your charging system is operating as required  

Charging system diagnoses Plus the "Free Power MOD"
Started by E.Marquez04 Apr 2008 04:07 AM

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Yes there is some history of the instrumentation going bad. It normally draws keep-alive power but normal is less than 1 Ma.  There are some unsupported components on the circuit board that crack the solder joints.

 

The DRZ400 has good power generation capacity but the small wires and connectors can cause problems.

 

Yes you can ride the motorcycle with the instruments disconnected.

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Yes there is some history of the instrumentation going bad. It normally draws keep-alive power but normal is less than 1 Ma.  There are some unsupported components on the circuit board that crack the solder joints.

I don't remember dash failures causing a excessive power draw.... but I can hardly remember todays thursday  :devil:

 

 Noble do you remember reading about a dash failure that caused above normal power draw?  By chance do you remember what the component was that failed and caused that symptom? Or if it was fixed by the reader?

 

Thanks

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No, I do not remember any dash failures that specifically draw more current.  Typical failure is the voltage regulator that causes loss of the display.  But once a failure occurs on a circuit board I really don't know what else can happen.  Just shooting in the dark.  But as a general answer - yes there is some history of instrumentation failure and if the poster can verify the dash is drawing 30ma at rest, something weird is going on.  Might just be wet.

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One more data point:

I leave my 2001 DRZ alone for weeks (in a cold barn) - never disconnected the battery - and I always

have enough juice to start. I did the power-mode years ago and bought a good quality battery.

 

I'd say your battery drain is unusual;

 

Gerry

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Where are you measuring the drain?  Use a small screwdriver and pop the red wire out of the connector at the speedo connector to be sure it is the speedo for the full 30mA.

 

DO use a battery tender.  DON'T constantly use a small battery charger that isn't automatic at least.  The cheap ones are transformers with a rectifier and will happily damage the battery by never stopping.  A tender will go into float mode once charged and basically do nothing until needed again if the battery drops a bit.

 

If your battery is lead acid and has been run dead or close to several times put a new one on the shopping list.  You might be able to get it back if you have a charger with desulphate mode but the battery only takes a few run downs and its history.  These bike lead acid are chassis batteries not cabin batteries and can't take deep cycles.

 

I finally managed to wreck my several year old 4 cell LIFEPO4 Lithium Iron Phosphate Turntech 2.5A by being out of town for a couple months when the cold weather came on.  It took a lot of abuse prior to that as well.  It could sit for a couple months and still start.  The dealer in Kelowna carries Ballistic brand so that is what I purchased this time in the 8 cell 5A version.  There is a big difference in how the 2.5A and 5A spin the engine.  On a cold morning (32F) it was pretty much required to put the bike in neutral so it cranked smoothly with the 2.5A(4 cell).  Now with the 5A(8 cell) it will spin the engine fast in gear and has even started without the choke.  It cost more but I am glad I got the larger one.  The weight is still only about 2 pounds.

 

A side point:  The old 2.5A battery would not start the bike anymore and while riding the headlight started flickering.  Then the dash went dead.  I assumed it must be the failed battery not helping to even out the power.  As it turned out when I put in the new battery I still had problems.  I found the wire connector right by the fuse had corroded and I am not sure how much was getting through anymore.  Some was because the dash would still light up with the KOEO.  The dash still didn't work so I dismantled it and found some water had entered sufficiently to cause some corrosion inside.  I found the constant 12V trace to the 5V regulator failed and repaired it by running a wire from the downstream side of the isolation diodes by the incoming wires to the leg of the regulator and it works fine now.

 

The point of all this is I actually had 3 separate problems so don't assume it is just the speedo.  This is a great time of year for corrosion to show up.

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I was measuring between the negative battery terminal and battery wire.

 

24 hours later, with the odometer/computer disconnected, there is no voltage drop at all. It must be the culprit. I'll pull it off and give the wires a thorough inspection.

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Hmmmm....I now see that it is not the original ignition switch on the bike.

 

Could it be the ignition switch? With the speedometer/computer (which seems to be working fine) removed and igintion off there is no drain. Could attaching the speedo complete the short that is actually located somewhere else? Does that make any sense?

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Is the display showing on the speedo with the key off?  Should be no display and no backlight.   

 

On the stock ignition switch there is a wire to the tail light for run or for leaving only the tail light on while stopped where you could get hit. If the switch was changed to a simple on/off that wire should be on switched power not constant.  This seems unlikely as the problem as the bulb should be lit, but if something is haywire with the ground and it goes though both the signal and tail filaments it could be a possibility.  Gotta diagnose and see where the drain is going first.

 

Is anything even slightly warm?  3/100A isn't very much though heating wise.

 

Power to the CDI might make that much power disappear.

 

Not sure which model you have.  Generally any orange wire should only be powered while key on.  Red is constant 12v.  Wiring diagrams are posted on this forum.

 

From working on automobiles I can say that even 50mA is enough to drain a full size battery over a week.  30mA is way too much for a bike battery.

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It is a 2003s. I'm in Senegal, it probably cam from Europe.

 

No display and no backlight on the computer with the key off.

 

Only on/off for the ignition key switch, tail light is off. Zero drain with the computer removed, 30 milliamps when attached. If removing the speed eliminates the drain, doesn't the speedo have to be the casue of it?

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Yes.  Constant power to the computer is the red wire.  The orange also is power but only with the key ON.  You might try removing just the red wire, that should cure the 30ma drain.  The speedometer function might still work with the key ON if only the red wire is removed.  I don't know.

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The speedo will work fine.  Even the trip computers retain memory.  The clock will loose setting each time the power is disconnected.  There are diodes in the circuit so that either orange or red will power the required circuit inside the speedo.  Ensure that the red wire cannot touch ground just to be safe.

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You guys are right! Pulled off the red wire, no drain, computer runs fine when the ignition is on through the orange. So I lose the clock setting, no problem.

 

Someone was into the computer before, found some splicing, not sure about the story behind it.

 

Thanks for the help, TT to the rescue again!

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Put it this way.

I didn't have my bone stock '13 plugged into charger for almost three months and she still fired up no problem.

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Great.  Glad to hear it.  I learned something too.  Disconnecting the red wire sounds like a good trick to reduce some of the normal ma amp draw if the owner does not care about a clock.

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