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Shock/fork springs for 00 kx250

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I've lost some weight and it's feeling like enough that I should swap out my springs, which are currently 4.8 Shock and .40 fork. I was about 200 lbs but now I'm down around 170. Any recs on which to get? I'm a woods rider riding mostly rocky east coast trails.

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Unless you only do technical trail riding, those spring rates sound really light to me. I weigh 170 without gear, and my stock fork springs (.43) were too soft for motocross.

 

I run .46 fork springs. The stock rear spring (5.2) is OK for me.

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Have you had your forks revalved for trail riding?

Those spring rates sound about right to me.

 

Your message triggered my memory (my brain seems to be aging faster than the rest of me ;) ) and I went back and looked at my bike log. I just put these springs in back in Sept when I started working on knocking some fat off. I think I must have bought them in anticipation of losing the weight. So, I'm betting bouncing around so much yesterday had more to do with being rusty after the winter break than with having the wrong springs in. I do need to set the sag though.

 

The bike has been valved for local conditions. That said, I am wondering if there's anything I can do to make the bike a little more trail friendly, rock gardens in particular. It seems like I get more side to side deflection than the purpose built enduro bikes I ride with. I'm doing the dirt wise school in a month. That'll probably make more difference than playing around with the settings. ;)

 

Unless you only do technical trail riding, those spring rates sound really light to me. I weigh 170 without gear, and my stock fork springs (.43) were too soft for motocross.

 

I run .46 fork springs. The stock rear spring (5.2) is OK for me.

 

I first got on an MX track when I was over 30 (budds creek but on a pure trail bike, klx300) and will have to admit that I am simply not thrill seeking enough to start doing big jumps that late in my life. I'm probably less adventurous at 45 than I was at 30. So, yeah, just trails, at least with any kind of real speed. ;)

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Your message triggered my memory (my brain seems to be aging faster than the rest of me ;) ) and I went back and looked at my bike log. I just put these springs in back in Sept when I started working on knocking some fat off. I think I must have bought them in anticipation of losing the weight. So, I'm betting bouncing around so much yesterday had more to do with being rusty after the winter break than with having the wrong springs in. I do need to set the sag though.

The bike has been valved for local conditions. That said, I am wondering if there's anything I can do to make the bike a little more trail friendly, rock gardens in particular. It seems like I get more side to side deflection than the purpose built enduro bikes I ride with. I'm doing the dirt wise school in a month. That'll probably make more difference than playing around with the settings. ;)

I first got on an MX track when I was over 30 (budds creek but on a pure trail bike, klx300) and will have to admit that I am simply not thrill seeking enough to start doing big jumps that late in my life. I'm probably less adventurous at 45 than I was at 30. So, yeah, just trails, at least with any kind of real speed. ;)

Nothing wrong with that at all, I don't do big jumps anymore either unless they're table tops.

But down here in Florida EVERYTHING turns into gigantic brutal whoops. Even the trails are just miles long whoop sections. So even for trail riding here you need MX suspension, that's why I sold the KDX when I moved here, it just beat me up too bad.

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If you haven't you may try disabling the fork bladders, that helps make the forks more plush. I have 2 sets of those forks 2 sets f 99 forks that have no bladders and I fine I only end up using my 99 stuff.

 

BTW your springs seem a little light to me too but could be great for tuff trail riding.

 

Ed

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Nothing wrong with that at all, I don't do big jumps anymore either unless they're table tops.

But down here in Florida EVERYTHING turns into gigantic brutal whoops. Even the trails are just miles long whoop sections. So even for trail riding here you need MX suspension, that's why I sold the KDX when I moved here, it just beat me up too bad.

 

I've seen some little girls hitting the big jumps at budds on 80s but, eah, at this stage in life I'm not going to have my pride hurt just because I'm not willing to try. I did an enduro in NJ that was all sand/all whoops. I guess you just get used to it (like the rocks where I ride) but it seemed pretty insane at the time.

 

If you haven't you may try disabling the fork bladders, that helps make the forks more plush. I have 2 sets of those forks 2 sets f 99 forks that have no bladders and I fine I only end up using my 99 stuff.

 

BTW your springs seem a little light to me too but could be great for tuff trail riding.

 

Would the valving stay the same if the bladders were disabled? I'm pretty ignorant on suspension stuff, how do I disable the bladders?

Here's what I mean by rocks, this is one of the places I ride:

DSCN2935.jpg

It's kind of fun to come up on the trucks crawling through and zip around them. ;)

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I've seen some little girls hitting the big jumps at budds on 80s but, eah, at this stage in life I'm not going to have my pride hurt just because I'm not willing to try. I did an enduro in NJ that was all sand/all whoops. I guess you just get used to it (like the rocks where I ride) but it seemed pretty insane at the time.

Would the valving stay the same if the bladders were disabled? I'm pretty ignorant on suspension stuff, how do I disable the bladders?

Here's what I mean by rocks, this is one of the places I ride:

DSCN2935.jpg

It's kind of fun to come up on the trucks crawling through and zip around them. ;)

Before I moved here I lived in Atlanta and did most of my riding in the steep rocky trails of the N Georgia mountains. So yeah, it wad a big change, and a steep learning curve learning to ride in powdery sand instead of the hard clay and rocks I was used to.

But I gotta tell ya, wet sand provides more traction than anything else, it's a blast! And wrecks don't hurt as much in soft sand either.

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One of these days I'll have to ride in FL. I'm intrigued by Croom, if only because I grew up in Croom, Maryland. ;) I'm not going to say that I've never had a serious fall in the rocks (that's like bringing a curse down on myself) but it does seem like sand would be more forgiving.

 

Looks like I could have fun in Idaho. I don't get enough serious hill practice here but looks like that's not a problem for you out there.

 

I'll check out the suspension forum. Thanks!

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One of these days I'll have to ride in FL. I'm intrigued by Croom, if only because I grew up in Croom, Maryland. ;) I'm not going to say that I've never had a serious fall in the rocks (that's like bringing a curse down on myself) but it does seem like sand would be more forgiving.

Looks like I could have fun in Idaho. I don't get enough serious hill practice here but looks like that's not a problem for you out there.

I'll check out the suspension forum. Thanks!

A lot of people ride at Croom but I can't stand the place. It gets ridiculously overcrowded and people ride like insane morons there. Both times that I rode there I had to run off the trail to avoid being hit head-on by retards on quads flying around blind turns like they were in the points lead for a championship. And thievery is rampant there, anything you want to take back home with you better be very well secured. I won't ever go there again.

Ocala National Forest has a lot of good riding.

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Ok, avoid Croom. I can do that. I managed to leave my truck unlocked half the day yesterday and everything was where I left it when I got back.

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Ok, avoid Croom. I can do that. I managed to leave my truck unlocked half the day yesterday and everything was where I left it when I got back.

I had a friend that took their enclosed trailer to Croom and padlocked it when they left to ride. Came back about 4 hours later to find someone had taken a pair of tin snips to the side of the trailer and emptied it. To say he was pissed is putting it mildly.

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MDer, you can't compare Budds to local tracks.  Budds has huuuuuge jumps.  Pic blow puts in perspective.  Unless you've been there in person the TV doesn't do it justice.  But like Ed said, try removing or disabling the bladders.  I just removed them completely from my forks, or you can disable them by removing the seal ring.  It's straight forward once the fork is apart.  Also, a frind of mine rides strictly trails and had some issues with harshness.  I've been messing around with bleed shims and had some decent results.  Also, I use this site for spring rates:  http://www.moto-pro.com/mybike.asp

 

IMG_2610.jpg

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Oh, yeah, I skipped straight to a national/world level track. ;) The club I belonged to at the time had access to budds so long as you did one work day/year. So, it was practically free otherwise I might never have gotten on an mx track.

 

I was just replacing the front brake line (smashed the old one on a rock, go figure) and noticed that I'm not using about 2.5" of front suspension travel...

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