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I have my chain tightened as much as it will tighten pretty much on setting 7 i was wondering should i buy a new chain or possibly take a link out? Thanks everybody

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Depends? Is your chain that stretched? Or is your chain just too long?

 

If it's properly tensioned now, doesn't really matter where it is on the adjustment really. It will be a better more wheelie resistant that far back, really minimal effect on on handling.

 

If your chain is stretched that much I would replace the sprockets as well.

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Yea im pretty sure the chain stretched that much it was really loose on the seeting i had it on prior when last season it was fine as far as i remember and now its as much as i can tighten it if it gets any looser i cant tighten it. Prob time for a new one. Bikes only got 6500 miles after pretty much one year. Had 1700 when i got it the winter before last

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Shortening warn chain by removing a link is an out of date and unsafe practice.  A warn chain needs to be replaced along with sprockets if needed.

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Thank you how easy is replacing the chain or should i ha e a ehop do that? I might as well myself if i send my rear shock to get serviced.

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It's an easy but dirty job. Shouldn't take much longer that 10-15 minutes. Just make sure the chain you buy comes with a master link unless you wanted it riveted and non removable.

Hardest part us removing the old chain. Do you have an angle grinder or even a dremel. ?

Edited by 707drz

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I only run rivet links, never seen a reason to remove a chain once installed. However I don't ride dirt, so maybe that's it.

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Well, if you are replacing sprockets along with the chain it is more than 15 min job. Requires the right tools and a torque wrench for the countershaft nut. 12mm 6 point box wrench and hex key for the rear sprocket. A way to cut the old chain. And a way to press the new master link together on a new chain.  All easy stuff but not so easy if never done before and/or do not have the tools.  A good job to learn on with some experienced help.

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DID ERT2 520 Gold Chain works great for track/mx. Lighter than o-ring chains and very strong. OEM sprockets work just as well as most aftermarket products, the key is keeping the chain/sprockets clean and well lubed after every ride/race.

 

WD-40 and ZEP works great.

 

Ride safe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Commuting in New York, I would certainly choose a sealed chain and not care about weight.  Any name brand with O rings,  X rings, W rings or XW seals will work for you.  Expect to pay around $100 for a good chain.  Depending on model and sprockets you will need 110 or 112 pins.  Might want to count what you have before you order.  Common practice is chain is sold in 120 pin length and cut by the owner to length.  For long life buy steel rear sprocket and OEM or top quality aftermarket front sprocket. 

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DID ERT2 520 Gold Chain works great for track/mx. Lighter than o-ring chains and very strong. OEM sprockets work just as well as most aftermarket products, the key is keeping the chain/sprockets clean and well lubed after every ride/race.

 

WD-40 and ZEP works great.

 

Ride safe.

 

 

 

 

 

a NON-oring chain will last about three weeks in commuting conditions, or mud. 

 

also, the chain in your pictures is too tight. 

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a NON-oring chain will last about three weeks in commuting conditions, or mud. 

 

also, the chain in your pictures is too tight. 

 

I was not referring to the best chain for commuting conditions, I'm strictly referring to mx/track conditions. Also, my chain is set to 1 1/2" of slack/tension on the upper run between front/rear sprockets. It may look snug in the pic, but it is set to proper tension.  

 

I've been running non o-ring chains for years, and never had one stretch or break. 

 

Cheers.

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Even mx and track conditons, oring chain life is substantial over non oring chains. Even horse power difference if at all isn't worth the extra labor and time, but I'll not knock your choice.

However on the DRZ, I avoided going with a real heavy oring thinking a power cut. Eventually I got tired of base aftermarket orings lasting 8 to 10,000 miles and eventually decided to try a Heavier Regina Oring, Best move I made on the bike chain wise. But go big either a regina ORS2 or a DID ZVM.

On a side note, I did try a racing non oring the drz, I hadn't ran a non oring in 20 years, being there were so many new designs on the market I thought Id give one a try, it lasted about 3,000 miles, and required constant labor, it just sucked.

Edited by Spud786

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Spud,

 

That all makes perfectly good sense.. I don't put near the miles on my chains and sprockets in a given year that you guys do. I strictly race mx nearly every weekend year in/year out, and we simply replace the chain and sprockets every few months. I don't ride in much mud unless the track is really wet, which is not often in West TX and AZ. I would agree with you on the heavier chains for the kind of miles you're talking about. 

 

For me, the lighter non o-ring chain works great, is much lighter than o-ring chains. We pull the chain after every race, clean both sprockets and chain, reinstall, lube it up, set the tension, and ready for the next race. 

 

Glad to hear the ORS2 and DID ZVM chains are working for you.

 

Ride safe.

 

LJ

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rivet links are applicable to high speed superbikes but not really needed for a tractor DRZ. master links are great for removing the chain so it can be given a good clean up and soaked in oil. to press on the master link just use a small G clamp and 8-10mm socket. any o ring chain will drag a bit more power than a non o ring chain but thats the price of low maintenance. on the road we are not chasing the last half a horsepower. as a side note i have stopped trying to do wheelies on my DRZ and the chains literally last twice as long  

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You guyw use the ors2 and zvm? What sizes? And they should be fine i ride alot of road and i try for as much off road, gravel, and mud as i can one of those chains will be suitable for that type of riding?

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Size is 520.  Length is what you have now (count the pins) or buy 120 and cut to fit.

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Spud,

 

That all makes perfectly good sense.. I don't put near the miles on my chains and sprockets in a given year that you guys do. I strictly race mx nearly every weekend year in/year out, and we simply replace the chain and sprockets every few months. I don't ride in much mud unless the track is really wet, which is not often in West TX and AZ. I would agree with you on the heavier chains for the kind of miles you're talking about. 

 

For me, the lighter non o-ring chain works great, is much lighter than o-ring chains. We pull the chain after every race, clean both sprockets and chain, reinstall, lube it up, set the tension, and ready for the next race. 

 

Glad to hear the ORS2 and DID ZVM chains are working for you.

If you go to orings you should be able to ride and race, up to 12months on a set up. Back when I used to ride 125's I used to do the chain every few months, but that was before orings.

 

Ride safe.

 

LJ

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Spud,

 

That all makes perfectly good sense.. I don't put near the miles on my chains and sprockets in a given year that you guys do. I strictly race mx nearly every weekend year in/year out, and we simply replace the chain and sprockets every few months. I don't ride in much mud unless the track is really wet, which is not often in West TX and AZ. I would agree with you on the heavier chains for the kind of miles you're talking about. 

 

For me, the lighter non o-ring chain works great, is much lighter than o-ring chains. We pull the chain after every race, clean both sprockets and chain, reinstall, lube it up, set the tension, and ready for the next race. 

 

Glad to hear the ORS2 and DID ZVM chains are working for you.

If you go to orings you should be able to ride and race, up to 12months on a set up. Back when I used to ride 125's I used to do the chain every few months, but that was before orings.

 

Ride safe.

 

LJ

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