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Mystery "thing"

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Hello, my '04 cr250 is leaking oil out of the right side case.

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1398019664.295097.jpg

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1398019675.412351.jpg

The leak is from the bottom bolt with the damaged head, but that's probably just the o-ring. The mystery is just above that, with the circular part that has the square inside it. It's leaking oil there too and it looks like something used to be there but broke off.

What was there? What did it do? Why does my spare engine not have anything there at all??

Also, is there a easy fix to just plug the leak? I could drill a hole and thread it and put a bolt in it but that's more work than simply using the case off my spare engine.

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Here's the spare I have, nothing in that spot:

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1398027972.251635.jpg

And the inside offers no clues as to what could be there

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1398028016.887766.jpg

Looks like it would be where the circle with the rectangle tab would be.. I'm so stumped lol.

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The older CR250s had a access point in that general location for engaging and disengaging the power valve actuator arm.  Maybe  some body swapped an older model outer cover on to your 04. I would swap covers with the spare one and then you could have the other one welded up and machined back for a spare.

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That's my plan, I checked and don't have a gasket to do it right now which is why I'm looking for a quick fix. I can weld, and kinda sorta weld aluminum but I think I'd still have to remove it for that and I wouldn't want to warp it.

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That's my plan, I checked and don't have a gasket to do it right now which is why I'm looking for a quick fix. I can weld, and kinda sorta weld aluminum but I think I'd still have to remove it for that and I wouldn't want to warp it.

Cast Aluminum is really not considered weldable. It can be kinda done but you would work with a caved-in blob instead of a puddle. Cast is just full of air pockets and contaminants.

Edited by AXAxiom

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Yeah, any other ideas though? I've no experience with JB weld or those other temp fixes.

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Find someone good with a TIG.

 

 

Cast Aluminum is really not considered weldable. It can be kinda done but you would work with a caved-in blob instead of a puddle. Cast is just full of air pockets and contaminants.

This is with TIG, and I can weld Beer cans together all day long

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Ive got a friend that welds up case halves for me.He machines and drills and taps threads.The important part of it(he says) is the filler material.

 

Why are you welding cans together?Bass boat? JOKE :ride:

 

Ive got some patches made of 18 ga stainless glued on with JB slow weld that are 3 years old and older.

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Ive got a friend that welds up case halves for me.He machines and drills and taps threads.The important part of it(he says) is the filler material.

 

Why are you welding cans together?Bass boat? JOKE :ride:

 

Ive got some patches made of 18 ga stainless glued on with JB slow weld that are 3 years old and older.

Not saying it can’t be done but it’s not pretty, with some machining or grinding afterwards I guess.

 

If that’s the case then I agree with slomojo and take it to a good aluminum TIG welder and have them try it, it may not be as bad I imagine

I bet you can get the side case off without damaging the gasket and if you do damage it use Permatex #2. I keep reusing my $35 Rekluse gasket for the obvious cost advantage

Edited by AXAxiom

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I have no doubt on whether it can be done, but can it be done without taking anything apart? I'm lazy you see lol.

Nah I think I'll do some research on wether or not it's reasonable to just cover the hole with something, otherwise I'll pop it off and try keep the gasket good, and add some silicon to the gasket surface when I put the new one on. I'm just incredibly lucky that I have a parts engine. Wouldn't be the first time I used it.

I actually bought this bike used to ride last spring, blew up on the 3rd go and I ended up with a project instead of a ride.

Anyway, after a full rebuild (thanks guys here for helping me where I needed it), and some coin, it's running strong. Just this oil leak to sort out and a idle issue. At the moment I'm setting the idle with the throttle cable because the carb seems broken. Works ok but results in a wicked touchy throttle and bumps makes the engine rev lol.

So the mystery "thing" has something to do with older bikes? Seems legit, this thing was a complete hack job. Even the dowel pins weren't installed when it came to me..

Edited by runnybunny

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Cast Aluminum is really not considered weldable.

 

LMAO! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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The cases and covers are high pressure die cast aluminum. It is weldable, but if your welder is not familiar with welding that type of material, he can make a real mess of it. 

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The cases and covers are high pressure die cast aluminum. It is weldable, but if your welder is not familiar with welding that type of material, he can make a real mess of it. 

Thanks for clarifying Camp

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Are JB weld and similar products pretty runny until set? I assume I'm going to be laying the bike on its side for the duration of the curing but I'm not if it'll be enough.

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JB Weld makes a product especially for aluminum. I would clean it very well and try that.

 

I don't use JB Weld very often, but it's the perfect fix for stripped out oil check holes. Measuring the the oil is better than relying on that check hole anyway. 

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I had an overdrive gear break in my 88 Ford Ranger manual transmission. The main shaft wore out at the gear and the sleeve the gear rode on wobbled pretty bad. Instead of buying a new transmission for $2000 I decided to use JB weld on the sleeve, installed two new gears, and put 65,000 more miles on it with no problems

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Alright, I'll try it today with JB Weld. I was also warned to avoid mixing it on anything that'll draw the moisture out ie. cardboard because it won't set right; and that the mixture between the base and the hardener needs to be as close to exact as possible (warranting measuring it out somehow).

I'm reading of people using this fix on much more extreme applications, from oil pans to engine heads so according to that, this miracle stuff should have no issue whatsoever on this job. I'll also scuff up the bonding surface a bit with emery cloth for better adhesion, even though it looks like there's plenty to bite into already.

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