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Wanna run Engine Ice or Water Wetter but....

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I live in the mountains of Montana and sadly our house we moved into doesnt have a heated garage, this winter it got down to -37 degrees BELOW ZERO.  I used to run water/water wetter, back when we had a heated garage. I do need ever bit of cooling power needed as I ride the big Idaho dunes all summer.  So I don't really wanna run pure anti-freeze with fear of overheating problems, so I was contemplating Engine Ice.  But thats only rated down to -26.

 

Should I just bite the bullet and throw traditional coolant in there?  Any other ideas

 

P.S bikes in question are a CRF450X and a 1991 CR500

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Like mentioned  , drain the coolant if the temps are that low , and wait till riding to re-fill , your better off , unless you put a radiant heater , or one of those little thermostatically controlled mini heaters in there to keep the temp above freezing , but then you have to pay the power bill for it

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you can drain it during winter, or even switch to antifreeze

+1, that was my thought exactly.  Drain it until you're ready to go ride again.  If you use a mix, there's no need to throw it away, just store it until you're ready to use it again.  That's what I would do.  -37 is way too freaking cold, and I complain about freezing in the 30s here in upper deserts of California.  I didn't know people actually just use plain water instead of an anti-freeze mix.  Why would someone not want to use anti-freeze?  Just asking because the rigs I do own that are water cooled, all have anti-freeze in them and it's worked out quite well.  I keep a close eye on that.  If I see contaminants, I immediately flush it out and put in a new mix of 50/50 anti-freeze. :devil:

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Either engine ice or my favorite

Life Time guarantee evans.

No water in it at all and last forever.

Unless you burn it

Only issue is you can't mix anything else with it.

Unless you flush it out.

I use evans and it is wonderful cold or hot. I rode in -30 this year and it was not froze

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Drain it.  I would use water wetter though.  It works. I've proved it with a digital temp gun on 50cc centrifugal clutch bikes that generate a good deal of heat because of the slipping clutch.

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I'd drain it and fill with straight antifreeze for winter storage instead. That way if you somehow forget to refill it in the spring you'll have something in there. By the same token, sometimes you can have a pocket of water that stays in even if drained and this can cause you problems. Straight ethylene glycol freezes at -40 to -60 so you'll be covered. 

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+1, that was my thought exactly.  Drain it until you're ready to go ride again.  If you use a mix, there's no need to throw it away, just store it until you're ready to use it again.  That's what I would do.  -37 is way too freaking cold, and I complain about freezing in the 30s here in upper deserts of California.  I didn't know people actually just use plain water instead of an anti-freeze mix.  Why would someone not want to use anti-freeze?  Just asking because the rigs I do own that are water cooled, all have anti-freeze in them and it's worked out quite well.  I keep a close eye on that.  If I see contaminants, I immediately flush it out and put in a new mix of 50/50 anti-freeze.  :devil:

 

Nothing cools better than pure water and/or water wetter, anti-freeze raises the boiling point and lowers the freezing point but with this you do loose some cooling capabilities.  

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ill probably just end up throwing in water + water wetter for the summer and then drain and refill with coolant for the winter.  I like that idea, because I really would like to get every bit of cooling ability that I can for this summer.  All they do is get hotter

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Nothing cools better than pure water and/or water wetter, anti-freeze raises the boiling point and lowers the freezing point but with this you do loose some cooling capabilities.  

Good to know thanks.  Draining the oil is as far as I would go if I was in a cold environment like that.  I'd definitely go with anti-freeze myself.  I've had a lot of bad experiences with cars and trucks where I just used water.  For example, I have a 78 Z28 that hasn't been driven for years.  The last time I fired it up, I didn't realize I only had water in the radiator and as time had passed, it (the water) turned to rust and froze my water pump to the point of busting the belt.  Since then I've made sure to use anti-freeze in everything I own, but there's a down side to anti-freeze as well when you put it in storage.  I also have a SC300 I had in storage for years and had anti-freeze in it, but when I finally fired it up after a few years, I didn't realize that the anti-freeze like many other things also have a shelf life, so the silicone (I'm no chemist) properties end up separating from the liquid itself and clogged up the radiator.  But I didn't know that just using water is best.  I suppose if someone was really skeptical about having the best, they would use just water (provided they don't live in a freezing cold environment) and just add flushing it periodically through their maintenance schedule.  Again, I'm no expert and is why I was asking and thanks to you, I've just learned something new.  All I can offer is past experience using both and it seems like my worries about over heating (hasn't yet) are solved by just using plain old H2o.  Thanks for the tip. :devil:

Edited by YZ490-DEVIL

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Good to know thanks. Draining the oil is as far as I would go if I was in a cold environment like that. I'd definitely go with anti-freeze myself. I've had a lot of bad experiences with cars and trucks where I just used water. For example, I have a 78 Z28 that hasn't been driven for years. The last time I fired it up, I didn't realize I only had water in the radiator and as time had passed, it (the water) turned to rust and froze my water pump to the point of busting the belt. Since then I've made sure to use anti-freeze in everything I own, but there's a down side to anti-freeze as well when you put it in storage. I also have a SC300 I had in storage for years and had anti-freeze in it, but when I finally fired it up after a few years, I didn't realize that the anti-freeze like many other things also have a shelf life, so the silicone (I'm no chemist) properties end up separating from the liquid itself and clogged up the radiator. But I didn't know that just using water is best. I suppose if someone was really skeptical about having the best, they would use just water (provided they don't live in a freezing cold environment) and just add flushing it periodically through their maintenance schedule. Again, I'm no expert and is why I was asking and thanks to you, I've just learned something new. All I can offer is past experience using both and it seems like my worries about over heating (hasn't yet) are solved by just using plain old H2o. Thanks for the tip. :devil:

Like I said in a previous post. Evans is a great coolent.

It is water free and has no expiration to it. It is life time guaranteed and I run it in every machine I have.

It is a wetting agent as well

And yes the silicates in antifreeze part after due time.

Evans again is great

The one down fall is that you can not mix anything with it. It is used solely alone.

I have added water 8n a bind and was told it's fine just not to run long.

If you want to change to something else just flush it with water.

Evans

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Water by itself is great for heat transfer but it's no good for the water pump seal. In addition hot water causes pretty crazy electrolysis (corrosion damage) to the steel/aluminum interfaces.

 

Mostly the guys I know of who run plain water are street track riders. The track management wants to keep antifreeze off the pavement after a crash. It's slippery as hell and hard to clean up. So when you ride street track you run water in your rads and then switch back to antifreeze mix for regular riding as soon as you get home.

Guys with dedicated track bikes run all kinds of additives to their water to try to keep their engine from rotting inside.

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