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need help with rear maxxis desert IT tire

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Hey guys, I have the above mentioned tire on my bike but I need to pull it off so I can lace up some new spokes. The problem is that I cannot get the damned thing off the rim. Putting the thing on last summer was a pain but this is worse. I can get part of the bead off the rim, but once that happens, I cannot manage to squeeze my tire spoons under the bead to keep going. Besides using dish soap, are there any tricks that will help me get this thing off?

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Hey guys, I have the above mentioned tire on my bike but I need to pull it off so I can lace up some new spokes. The problem is that I cannot get the damned thing off the rim. Putting the thing on last summer was a pain but this is worse. I can get part of the bead off the rim, but once that happens, I cannot manage to squeeze my tire spoons under the bead to keep going. Besides using dish soap, are there any tricks that will help me get this thing off?

I'm no expert, but here are few tips that's helped me in the past. Get the tube out of the tire, then the locks so all you have left to deal with is the tire and rim.  Now here something really important.  When you're ready to take the bead off the tire, make sure the opposing bead (other side) is in the middle of the rim.  That's what happens to a lot of people when taking a tire off.  They start working one side while the other is still beaded against the rim.  Have the other side bead in the middle of the rim, gives the tire the pliability to get off from the other side.  Hope that helps. Oh and yep  soapy water helps, hell, grease, oil, anything slippery helps, but then have to clean that stuff off both the rim and tire before mounting it again, and oil products are really never ideal to use on tires and rim.  But if it has to come out, believe me, oil products WILL help.  Just make sure your opposing bead is centered to the middle of the rim before trying to get the other side of the bead off and you'll be ok. :devil:

Edited by YZ490-DEVIL

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I'm no expert, but here are few tips that's helped me in the past. Get the tube out of the tire, then the locks so all you have left to deal with is the tire and rim.  Now here something really important.  When you're ready to take the bead off the tire, make sure the opposing bead (other side) is in the middle of the rim.  That's what happens to a lot of people when taking a tire off.  They start working one side while the other is still beaded against the rim.  Have the other side bead in the middle of the rim, gives the tire the pliability to get off from the other side.  Hope that helps. Oh and yep  soapy water helps, hell, grease, oil, anything slippery helps, but then have to clean that stuff off both the rim and tire before mounting it again, and oil products are really never ideal to use on tires and rim.  But if it has to come out, believe me, oil products WILL help.  Just make sure your opposing bead is centered to the middle of the rim before trying to get the other side of the bead off and you'll be ok. :devil:

what he said -  plus using 3 tire irons really help me alot,  always pulling the middle one and advancing it further down the rim

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I'm no expert, but here are few tips that's helped me in the past. Get the tube out of the tire, then the locks so all you have left to deal with is the tire and rim.  Now here something really important.  When you're ready to take the bead off the tire, make sure the opposing bead (other side) is in the middle of the rim.  That's what happens to a lot of people when taking a tire off.  They start working one side while the other is still beaded against the rim.  Have the other side bead in the middle of the rim, gives the tire the pliability to get off from the other side.  Hope that helps. Oh and yep  soapy water helps, hell, grease, oil, anything slippery helps, but then have to clean that stuff off both the rim and tire before mounting it again, and oil products are really never ideal to use on tires and rim.  But if it has to come out, believe me, oil products WILL help.  Just make sure your opposing bead is centered to the middle of the rim before trying to get the other side of the bead off and you'll be ok. :devil:

Keeping the bead inside of the rim is probably what is holding me back. Next time I have a nice sunny day to work on it, I'll let the wheel sit out in the sun and give it another shot while making sure to keep the bead inside. Thanks for the tip, man.

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what he said -  plus using 3 tire irons really help me alot,  always pulling the middle one and advancing it further down the rim

I have 3 of them and that method always works, but this tire is a bear

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Keeping the bead inside of the rim is probably what is holding me back. Next time I have a nice sunny day to work on it, I'll let the wheel sit out in the sun and give it another shot while making sure to keep the bead inside. Thanks for the tip, man.

No worries man, believe me I know what you're freaking going through.  I recently went 10 rounds with a 5.60 x 18 rear that was just impossible to man handle enough to maintain the other side in the middle of the rim while working the opposing side.  Helps if you have a buddy helping you, or of course if you have some kind of tire changer that hold the opposing bead center to the rim.  When I went through that bout, all I kept thinking was, why humans only have two hand and not three.  If I had another hand, it would of went without a hitch. Reluctantly, I ended up paying my local mc shop $25 to just dismount and remount another tire.  Cold is definitely not your friend when changing tires, so the "nice sunny day" "let it warm up thing" actually helps a little.  Good luck. :devil:

Edited by YZ490-DEVIL
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I have 3 of them and that method always works, but this tire is a bear

You are right at the crux,  1 more bite and it will get easy.  My 3rd tire iron is actually a 20 inch pry bar from harbor freight,  just in case a tire desides to challenge my authority.  one time I said to hell with it and just cut the old tire off with a saws all and a grinder wheel,  got more satisfaction from that than i do actually pulling off a tire correctly - for some reason!

 

 make sure the tire is loose on the rim (essentially the bead has been broken all the way around, on both sides)  thats the bead in the middle every one is talking about.  once you get one side off,  make sure you pull the other side off the opposite side of the rim,  then just turn the rim sideways and pull it out,  thats easier than trying to pull both beads off the same side.

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The extra hand is called a bead buddy. Buy one , best $15 bucks youll ever spend. Dismounting tough tires, i like to remove each bead on its own sidr of the wheel , then just pop the wheel out. Window cleaner works great as i tire lube,,,plus,no residue. I would not use any oil or grease on a tire bead because it may come back to haunt you when your wheel slips on the rim.

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No worries man, believe me I know what you're freaking going through.  I recently went 10 rounds with a 5.60 x 18 rear that was just impossible to man handle enough to maintain the other side in the middle of the rim while working the opposing side.  Helps if you have a buddy helping you, or of course if you have some kind of tire changer that hold the opposing bead center to the rim.  When I went through that bout, all I kept thinking was, why humans only have two hand and not three.  If I had another hand, it would of went without a hitch. Reluctantly, I ended up paying my local mc shop $25 to just dismount and remount another tire.  Cold is definitely not your friend when changing tires, so the "nice sunny day" "let it warm up thing" actually helps a little.  Good luck. :devil:

Good call on having someone to help you. I was trying to do this one solo, but most other times that I've changed a tire, I had someone to stand on the opposite side of the rim. A buddy and a can of chew usually do wonders for changing bike tires  :thumbsup:

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You are right at the crux,  1 more bite and it will get easy.  My 3rd tire iron is actually a 20 inch pry bar from harbor freight,  just in case a tire desides to challenge my authority.  one time I said to hell with it and just cut the old tire off with a saws all and a grinder wheel,  got more satisfaction from that than i do actually pulling off a tire correctly - for some reason!

 

 make sure the tire is loose on the rim (essentially the bead has been broken all the way around, on both sides)  thats the bead in the middle every one is talking about.  once you get one side off,  make sure you pull the other side off the opposite side of the rim,  then just turn the rim sideways and pull it out,  thats easier than trying to pull both beads off the same side.

it goes without saying, that once you have one side off, the rest is like butter.  But it's when you're struggling and putting too much pressure on one side that you start to "feel" your bead stretching to the point of where the rubber around it starts to rip.  That's really the pisser here about dismounting tires.  If you're not careful, you end up damaging the tire and you're back to square one.  I too have a few tire irons from Harbor Freight, they work great, but given the leverage you can get from them, it's not hard to damage the beads while in the process.  Truthfully, the last time I did a tire change, I decided to just strike up a deal with my m/c shop and buy all my rigs new tires with a low dismount and mount charge.  Not everyone feels comfortable paying someone else to do it, but every so often you look at the job at hand, and just can't resist doing away with the effort of doing it yourself.  In my case, it was super easy.  I dismounted eight tires and rims from the rigs, put them in the trunk and paid the price to have it done.  Dropped them off around 10am, and they were ready by noon.  Got back with them all and spent a good hour mounting them back on the rigs.  Doesn't get any easier than that, but of course, I ended up spending hundreds on new tires.  Not to get off topic, but I will add this, you want wear out your new tire fast, ride on pavement or asphalt. I'm not one to take my own advise and roost everything in site.  And when I see an asphalt road, I just can't resist riding it and pulling wheelies.  But that's just me.  I'm guessing I'll probably have to do tire changes on all my rigs at least once a year, and that can be a little expensive, but &%$#@! it, what better way to spend your money if not on your bikes. :devil:

Edited by YZ490-DEVIL
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I might just end up buying cheap soft tires from now on. I see videos on youtube of people pulling a soft tire off the rim without much effort at all and then I think of the time I have dealing with the heavy tires I usually buy.... It might be worth it 

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I'll chime in on this one :rolleyes:

 

Firstly I use a plastic milk crate as a stand. Bit hard on the back bending over BUT you can load stuff in it and take with you.

 

Didn't see this mentioned and maybe obvious but you have lossened off the rim lock???

 

I try and leave the tire's out in the sun or somewhere to warm them up if possible.

 

I have a spray bottle with diluted dish shop.

 

I have 2 set's of tire iron's.

 

I can normally get the tire  off with 2 of the STEEL 18"ish one's. These go in my gear bag.

 

I other set is for my frt/back tire nut size and go in my backpack with a tube and compressed air. These are pricy but light (aluminum) and packable. If the tire is a bitch, I use the longer of the 2 with the longer STEEL one's. I have done a tire with just these 2 to make sure I'm practiced in case I flat somewhere remote but not particularly fun.

 

There's lot's of you tube vid's but if I need a refresher or am drinking while doing a change, I use this one as a reference.

 

http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/708/Motorcycle-Video/Dunlop-Tire-Changing-Guide.aspx

 

I love my desert IT's!! :thumbsup:

 

 

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I have found that the Maxxis Desert IT tires are some of the hardest to change.  May not be everybody's experience, but has been true for me.

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I have found that the Maxxis Desert IT tires are some of the hardest to change.  May not be everybody's experience, but has been true for me.

Agreed. Never had so much trouble changing a tire until I tried the Maxxis desert. Never again.

Edited by DASFUEHRER

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Finally got it off. I guess third attempt is the charm. Thanks for your help, guys!

Soapy water and let it sit in the sun, Maxxis it deserts aren't that bad, sunshine softens them up a lot

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