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Simplest way to clean the KDX power valve?

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Just picked up a '97, looks good but the kips valve is gummed and needs cleaning. Can you pull the valve out without tearing down the engine?! Thanks

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At the very least you need to pull the cylinder head.

But you should just pull the cylinder. That will also give you a chance to inspect the topend and check the crank.

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The engine was rebuilt about 3 years ago, the piston looks great. It seems that taking the head and cylinder off are excessive measures for cleaning one power valve...can you unbolt the thing and put it back in without getting all the rods out of time?

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The only way I have ever done it is with pulling the cylinder. I guess you could do it with everything still on the bike, but I bet some of those bolts are going to be a real pain to get at.

Couple of questions for you,

How do you know that the sub valves aren't dirty?

How do you know that everything was timed properly when it was rebuilt?

How do you know you won't knock off some carbon into the cylinder when you pull the main valve?

If you are trying to flip this bike then I guess you don't have much to lose by leaving everything in place.

But if you are keeping the bike, why wouldn't you want to do the job properly?

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How do you know that the sub valves aren't dirty?

How do you know that everything was timed properly when it was rebuilt?

How do you know you won't knock off some carbon into the cylinder when you pull the main valve?

If you are trying to flip this bike then I guess you don't have much to lose by leaving everything in place.

But if you are keeping the bike, why wouldn't you want to do the job properly?

 

 

Time and expense, mostly.  The cylinder and piston look clean, so it just seemes extreme to have to crack open the cylinder to clean what's visibly dirty.  

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THEN DON"T DO IT!

 

Gas and go.  Let no man tell you that you actually have to spend time and money to properly maintain a motorcycle.

 

Don't let 'em keep you down.

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If you are determined to not tear it part and clean it properly, then just take the entire cylinder assembly to an engine shop and have it hot-tanked. It will spotlessly clean everything, including the internal power valve components.

 

Of course, you won't be inspecting any parts for wear and clearances this way, but at least they will be clean.

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While I appreciate the technical advice, any snobbery can be shoved where the sun don't shine. I just got this bike, and I'm learning the ins and outs. Coming from a snowmobile background, exhaust valves are almost university cleaned by taking the valve off and doing so. And to be honest, I was hoping for more than one view point, counting on the wealth of information that thumpertalk has provided on other occasions. So while I'm hearing that it just CANT BE DONE with out tearing down the whole engine, I guess it's up to me to find a way.

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You're hearing that "it can't be done without a tear-down" because it can't. The drum valves can't be removed without taking the cylinder off.

And you can stick your attitude in the aforementioned "where the sun don't shine" place.

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Unfortunately there is only one way to do it and its by taking the cylinder off. Sorry but there is no easy way. I wish there was. 

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How about this, then:

 

Just picked up a '97, looks good but the kips valve is gummed and needs cleaning. Can you pull the valve out without tearing down the engine?! Thanks

 

No.

 

The engine was rebuilt about 3 years ago, the piston looks great. It seems that taking the head and cylinder off are excessive measures for cleaning one power valve...can you unbolt the thing and put it back in without getting all the rods out of time?

 

No.

 

Time and expense, mostly.  The cylinder and piston look clean, so it just seemes extreme to have to crack open the cylinder to clean what's visibly dirty.  

 

Sorry, that is just how it is.

 

 

While I appreciate the technical advice, any snobbery can be shoved where the sun don't shine. I just got this bike, and I'm learning the ins and outs. Coming from a snowmobile background, exhaust valves are almost university cleaned by taking the valve off and doing so. And to be honest, I was hoping for more than one view point, counting on the wealth of information that thumpertalk has provided on other occasions. So while I'm hearing that it just CANT BE DONE with out tearing down the whole engine, I guess it's up to me to find a way.

 

 

Too bad that you don't WANT to take it apart to properly clean and inspect the power valve system.  That is just how it is.  Woman up, take a couple of Pamprin and get to it.

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The simple truth is, the KIPS system design is a weak point of the KDX200/220 and the KX250. If you don't clean and adjust it properly, it can (and will)seize up and cause damage, sometimes expensive damage on a KDX if the valves seize and break the actuator rod, which then drops into the tranny, gets ground up, and trashes a lot of expensive parts.

 

The system can NOT be cleaned or inspected without removing the cylinder and head to access the drum valves.

 

 

 

3889677_140426_010939_6256.png

 

You asked if it could be done without removing the cylinder, and were told no, it can't. You then stuck your tongue out and started whining about it being "excessive" because snowmobile power valve systems can be cleaned with a tear-down. Well these aren't snow mobiles. Sorry that you didn't like the answers.

Edited by Chokey
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The simple truth is, the KIPS system design is a weak point of the KDX200/220 and the KX250. If you don't clean and adjust it properly, it can (and will)seize up and cause damage, sometimes expensive damage on a KDX if the valves seize and break the actuator rod, which then drops into the tranny, gets ground up, and trashes a lot of expensive parts.

The system can NOT be cleaned or inspected without removing the cylinder and head to access the drum valves.

***this is constructive! thank you.

3889677_140426_010939_6256.png

You asked if it could be done without removing the cylinder, and were told no, it can't. You then stuck your tongue out and started whining about it being "excessive" because snowmobile power valve systems can be cleaned with a tear-down. Well these aren't snow mobiles. Sorry that you didn't like the answers.

***this really isn't. It's almost as if the KIPS design is your baby, coming off as a little defensive here. I'm looking for insight on an issue, and frankly, I'm shocked that the design is as complicated as it is. But hey, you never know unless you ask a question.

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You say I'M the one getting "defensive"? I'm not the one that told everyone to stick their posts up their collective asses. 

 

 

Be that as it may, you have your answer. The cylinder and head have to be removed to service the KIPS system. Not only can certain parts not be removed with doing so, but there is no way to properly clean the valve pockets in the cylinder without getting all sorts of debris in the engine unless you remove the cylinder.

 

Yes, the system is complex, but it's also a very effective system. In addition to controlling the effective stroke (main valve) and time-area (drum valves), the KIPS system also uses a surge chamber to absorb the excess exhaust positive-pulse wave pressure at low rpm. In my opinion only the Yamaha system is better, and only because it opens the valves in a more progressive manner than the Kawasaki system.

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While I appreciate the technical advice, any snobbery can be shoved where the sun don't shine. I just got this bike, and I'm learning the ins and outs. Coming from a snowmobile background, exhaust valves are almost university cleaned by taking the valve off and doing so. And to be honest, I was hoping for more than one view point, counting on the wealth of information that thumpertalk has provided on other occasions. So while I'm hearing that it just CANT BE DONE with out tearing down the whole engine, I guess it's up to me to find a way.

 

 

:goofy:   It can't w/o removing the head, but it'll look funny when you destroy the gear mechanisms for the valve. :facepalm:

Edited by AtomicXRer

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