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o-ring chain

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Ok so i have a new o-ring chain. I've heard of people soaking them in 90w oil before installing it. Think this would help any? Also what type of chain lube should I use? I've heard use dry and the wax type. Just trying to make it last as long as possible. -Damon

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Damon,

ask 1000 people about their chains,

get 1000 answers.

 

the oring chain is full of grease sealed inside,

thats the primary purpose of the orings

the secondary purpose is that it seals dirt and water out

 

Heres where i dont agree with many people,

last chain and sprocket,

a DID oring chan and Sunstar hard anodized sprocket

i never put a drop of chain lube on it ever,

and removed my chain every time i washed my bike and scrubbed my sprocket clean.

 

why?

i believe that chain lube attracts dirt, the dirt acts like grinding compound and eats your sprocket.

 

if you soak your chain in 90 wt.

its going to get all over your bike. and not get any inside the orings.

maybe they meant for a non oring chain which would make sense kinda.

 

any chain lube you use is not lubing the pins and rollers, its preventing corrosion hopefully and lubricating your sprocket/ roller interface.

 

one reason to possibly use some kinda chain lube is to prevent the orings from drying out and cracking and falling apart and falling off.

 

if your determined to use some kinda lube,

use pro link chain lube avaliable at bike shops its a dryish non tacky lube.

or DuPont chain saver. it dries with no tack.

 

me ill stay without my chain lube. and my new gold cadsium plated RK uw ring chain with no lube, on a hard (grey not color) anodized sunstar,  with molykote DRY film lubricant sprayed on the sprocket.  the molykote is basically like graphite spray paint.

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Chain lubes are a specialized product designed to do a bit more than simply lubricate the chain.  They are basically composed of two elements, a lubricant and a vehicle solvent.  The term "vehicle" is used because the solvent transports the lubricant into places it could not otherwise be expected to get to, like down inside the chain.  After the vehicle solvent penetrates the works, it then evaporates, leaving behind only the lube, which is generally in the nature of a thick grease, so as to stay on/in the chain better. 

 

The lube itself is usually a petroleum oil (natural or synthetic) and/or a dry powder/film lube like moly disulfide mixed with a metallic soap to form a grease.  The grease is formulated to have the ability to cling to the parts without being thrown off, and to reduce its tendency to catch and hold dirt.

 

None of these properties is found in 90 wt oil, so it's a bad choice.

 

Now, considering sealed chains, you have to realize that the pre-installed chain lube in such chains is sealed in, and the environment sealed out, as has been noted.  It's well at this point to understand that the primary point of wear that needs to be lubed in any chain is the link pin and the inside of the link pin sleeve.  This is the area that the lube is sealed into, and that you (and your chain lube) is sealed out of.  Applying lube to a sealed chain lubes only the outer roller where it runs on the outside of the link pin sleeve, and in the case of sealed chains, it lubes the exposed parts of the seal against the link plates, nothing more. 

 

I run Regina ORN6 sealed chains exclusively, and I use Maxima's "Synthetic Chain Guard" to lube it.  I like that product because it dries to a very low tack (so it doesn't grab a lot of dirt and sand) and because it washes off the chain readily with Simple Green and low pressure water.  Always apply it at least 8 hours before you ride to give it time to completely "dry".

 

The greatest natural enemy a sealed chain has is the pressure washer.  If you must use one on the chain, back away from it at least 12 inches, and spray only from the sides, never from the top, front, back, or any other angle that exposes the seals to the blast, or water and dirt will be driven under the seals, and lube will be driven out.  Likewise, avoid wire brushes or vigorous brushing of any kind that directly contacts the seals to prevent damaging them.

 

I get over a year, year-and-a-half out of my chains by following this regimen. 

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I use wd40 on all my o-ring chains after using decent brand chain lubes, I got almost 30% more usage from the wd40 lubed chains and sprockets

Same bike, same brand chain and sprockets and same riding terrain, just different lube

But do your own test, the results will speak for them selves

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WD40 is not a lubricant, regardless of what it says on the label, at least not a very good one.  It's mostly solvents, and was originally formulated as a water dispersant.  Hence the "WD".

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Ya Gray, I spray it on the chain after washing the bike mainly to stop the rust and get rid of water, so in effect I use no lube lol

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I also run O ring chains and I get multi year life from them, usually only need one chain adjustment a year. 

I pressure wash my bike after every ride using a low pressure Karscher electric washer and follow Grey's advice when near the chain and other shaft seals.  I then lube the chain with a Dupont spray on dry film teflon lube, it displaces water and lubes the rings.  Since it dries it doesn't attract dirt that would wear the chain and sprockets. 

 

This is sure a lot better than the maintenance required for non ring chains and their shorter life.

From a life cycle cost perspective for chain/sprockets the ring chains are much cheaper, and easier to maintain.

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