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XR400 new stator and connection

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Soooo,

My XR400 failed to start today and after checking it with my mechanic the stator is dead. 
The whole day I am reading posts about it but still haven't figured out what way to go in the end...

 

Ricky stator 200watt output (100+100) probably connecting only one output with the stock regulator (diagram 1)

http://www.rickystator.com/04technical/img/honda/RSXR400.pdf

 

The thing is, the bike already has a LED strip on the rear fender.  Does it work with AC? I also have a horn bolted which worked

for some days after I purchased the bike but one day it died. I guess it is because it was connected with AC as well. 
I also want to install a pair of LED turn signals.
Should I use the second stator output as a DC line (diagram 2) ?

Do I need a battery for that, or only regulator/rectifier?

If I use a battery why not single output?
Am I going to connect the stock headlight to the battery?

I know I am not clearly writing my questions but I am so confused after 5 hours of reading :/ I am ordering from the USA and I don't 

afford to make a mistake!
 

Cheers guys!

 

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LEDs will work on AC, they will only display the positive wave from the AC, I don't know what the frequency is on the bike, but my tail lamp/brake light is running off of AC and the pulse of AC positive voltage is only noticeable at low RPM and if your looking for it. As for the turn signals my flasher module will not work on AC, in fact mine let all the smoke out and had to be replaced :-( I would suggest one AC output, voltage regulated to the headlight ,higher wattage bulb or multiple and the other output rectified and regulated to all the LEDs, flashers, accessories, etc. I have never encountered a bike horn that will run uh AC but it is possible if designed to do so, so another reason for a DC circuit. I have a small 2/3 AA battery pack I will be using to help with the residual AC ripple from a rectifier, but a capacitor will work for this as well.

Hope this helps

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Thanks mate!

Can I have DC power without a battery, going only through a rectifier/regulator an then to the turn signals etc. ? (Haven't seen this anywhere)
Also, Isnt it weird if I put a battery to be able to use all the other lights except the headlight when I have my engine off? because the headlight will be on the one stator output.

If I stop using the bike lets say for 4 months would this kill the battery?

Cheers

Edited by PinkFloyd92

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I use a polisport halo headlight it has a city light (t10 bulb) that I've replaced with a t10 led projector bulb running on the battery and a H4 bulb on AC. I will recommend that you use a capacitor or battery on the DC circuit. Only because a rectifier/regulator does not produce perfect DC current. There will be significant AC noise without a capacitor or battery some devices will not like the AC ripple and malfunction I don't know how an electronic flasher will respond. Battery life is no different on your bike than anywhere else. Depends on the battery they won't stay charged gorever

Please excuse grammatical errors. Sent from my iPhone using Thumper Talk mobile app

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And one last question :) 

Is there a way to have a brighter-white light headlight without changing the stock? Lets say by changing bulb or changing the headlight unit (inside part) without going for a polisport halo headlight or something like that

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My buddy installed a brighter bulb on his XR400 and it made a slight difference.  I went from a 60w to 100w on my 250L which has a bigger reflector and it didn't make much difference either.  The reflector size is definitely a limitation.

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I wanted to ask another thing, can the stock headlight run on DC? For example, if I use the Ricky Stator why to leave the one output AC? and the other one going through the battery. Why not connect both the outputs going through the battery and then to all the things on DC?

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RS has a DC kit for the XR. One DC output to a battery or capacitor with 160W available for lighting. Stock is AC power so only halogen bulbs unless you go DC. Stock will work on either since its a halogen bulb.

Edited by michigan400

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I am planning to buy this kit
http://www.rickystator.com/catalog/honda-xr400-charging-system-p-626.html

 

And upgrade to the optional glass headlight of Honda and I want to use an H3 HID bulb. This requires DC

In this guide
http://www.rickystator.com/04technical/img/honda/RSXR400.pdf

I dont see connecting the two outputs(100+100) to provide 200watt straight  to the battery but they connect the headlight straght from the stator as AC
How the battery will provide 160 watt if only coming from 100watt output?

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Yup, that's it. 160 available for lighting and approx. 40 to keep the battery charged up. The stator outputs would be combined for a 200W single output and run to the reg/rec then to the battery.

 

So instead of an AC regulator feeding power to your wiring harness, it will be DC power from the battery. You would not have an AC output anymore, everything would run off the DC/battery.

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Yup, that's it. 160 available for lighting and approx. 40 to keep the battery charged up. The stator outputs would be combined for a 200W single output and run to the reg/rec then to the battery.

 

So instead of an AC regulator feeding power to your wiring harness, it will be DC power from the battery. You would not have an AC output anymore, everything would run off the DC/battery.

If you see the diagrams thouth there is no combined option with a battery. Would the regulator that is in the kit work for this combined 200watt output?

 

Can the CDI run on DC?  

I think it is connected directly from the stator, not from these two outputs.

 

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The DC kit should have its own set of instructions. The PDF you showed, you would do the 200w single output, just hooked to the rectifier like the dc side of the split set up shows. The kit is made to be all dc. The supplied reg/rec in the kit is plenty tough enough. The CdI has its own seperate feed from the stator. Completely seperate from the lighting output.

Edited by michigan400
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The DC kit should have its own set of instructions. The PDF you showed, you would do the 200w single output, just hooked to the rectifier like the dc side of the split set up shows. The kit is made to be all dc. The supplied reg/rec in the kit is plenty tough enough. The CdI has its own seperate feed from the stator. Completely seperate from the lighting output.

Thanks alot mate, i guess I will go full 200watt though battery. HID headlight stock tail light as break light, a LED stip as tail light and LED turn signals LED

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Related question, I'm in a similar situation.  Have the RS stator, but the Baja Designs Reg/Rec.  Wondering if the numbers below are just a coincidence, and if I'd be safe running the BD reg/rec with 200w of input. I've been reading a ton on this today and have seen plenty of yeses and nos.

 

 

RS Stator is 100w + 100w

They say the reg/rec with the kit above can handle 160w + 40w for charging = 200w total

 

The Baja Designs reg/rec is rated for 160w.  No mention of charging wattage.

 

The two units are either the same, or the BD one is rated for less power input and the numbers are just coincidental.  RS also lists a heavy duty 250w reg/rec on their site, but I assume given the numbers above that the HD unit isn't included in the above kit.  Could be wrong.  Sure I'd be safe getting the HD reg, but $55 + shipping/time to the great white north is not desirable.  Especially if it's just overkill.

Edited by Redpoint
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Related question, I'm in a similar situation.  Have the RS stator, but the Baja Designs Reg/Rec.  Wondering if the numbers below are just a coincidence, and if I'd be safe running the BD reg/rec with 200w of input. I've been reading a ton on this today and have seen plenty of yeses and nos.

 

 

RS Stator is 100w + 100w

They say the reg/rec with the kit above can handle 160w + 40w for charging = 200w total

 

The Baja Designs reg/rec is rated for 160w.  No mention of charging wattage.

 

The two units are either the same, or the BD one is rated for less power input and the numbers are just coincidental.  RS also lists a heavy duty 250w reg/rec on their site, but I assume given the numbers above that the HD unit isn't included in the above kit.  Could be wrong.  Sure I'd be safe getting the HD reg, but $55 + shipping/time to the great white north is not desirable.  Especially if it's just overkill.

 

 

The RS kit uses the heavy duty 250W reg/rec. The 160 from BD would work for 1 leg (100W) but not both together (200W). 

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The RS kit uses the heavy duty 250W reg/rec. The 160 from BD would work for 1 leg (100W) but not both together (200W). 

 

That's the simple answer I've read, here's the more complex one, using our 200w stator:

 

 

The rectifier part simply turns AC into DC, so let's concentrate on the regulator.

 

The regulator has two purposes 1) allow not more than 14.4V to pass from the stator to the electrical system, and 2) dissipate excess power (it does this in the form of heat).  This second part is the key understanding, please correct me if I'm wrong.

 

Power dissipation required = Power produced - Power usage

 

Therefore, if you have a constant draw of 200 watts, the regulator would not need to dissipate any excess power.  If you have a draw of zero watts, the regulator would be required to dissipate all 200 watts of power.

 

If the battery constantly draws 40w for charging, with no other electrical appliances on the circuit (remember the CDI/ignition is not part of this circuit), the regulator will need to constantly dissipate 160w.

 

Add a minimum 35w headlight, and a 5w tail light, and this brings it down to 120w.   A higher wattage headlight, combined with brake light, signals, 12V accessory socket, hand warmers, etc, and you significantly ease the stress on the regulator.

 

This is why I think the BD 160w rated regulator would work with the 200w single circuit stator.  The only problem would come if your battery dies and stops drawing power.  If your headlight bulb blows and nothing else in the system is on, this would put the regulator at it's capacity, but it should survive.

 

 

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