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2 stroke revving but no power

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Ok so I was out with my buddy today and I was lugging the 200 through some mud and over logs and stuff. So I notice it's almost like its not getting traction or something because it's just revving out almost. It was fine earlier but I just could barely pop it up in second with a flick of the throttle. Normally it comes right up so is it a fouled plug or are my clutch plates done for

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Ok so I was out with my buddy today and I was lugging the 200 through some mud and over logs and stuff. So I notice it's almost like its not getting traction or something because it's just revving out almost. It was fine earlier but I just could barely pop it up in second with a flick of the throttle. Normally it comes right up so is it a fouled plug or are my clutch plates done for

We are going to need more specifics  :thumbsup:

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Nevermind just re-read your post ,  This is really two different things you can usually tell pretty easy if it's something slipping or down on power . Hard to answer a question like this without feeling or seeing it. Check your clutch adjustment ? When is the last time you inspected your clutch plates ? 

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Nevermind just re-read your post ,  This is really two different things you can usually tell pretty easy if it's something slipping or down on power . Hard to answer a question like this without feeling or seeing it. Check your clutch adjustment ? When is the last time you inspected your clutch plates ?

never have, replacing em soon tho, it's like the bike is really revving out even when I change gears and than I let off the throttle and get back on it an it bogs down

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never have, replacing em soon tho, it's like the bike is really revving out even when I change gears and than I let off the throttle and get back on it an it bogs down

That's what i mean a slip is it's revving up as normal or even faster but the bike won't move or move slower ,  but a bog is power related like a dirty air filter or carb . 

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That's what i mean a slip is it's revving up as normal or even faster but the bike won't move or move slower ,  but a bog is power related like a dirty air filter or carb .

well when I Get on the gas it's almost like the rear wheel is spinning but i don't think the wheel is actually spinning up so I let off the throttle and get back on it and it bogs down and I give more gas and it revs up again

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some automotive oils have friction modifiers that will make your clutch slip, try switching oils.

 

 

That's pure internet BS. There's not an automotive oil on the shelf that will make your clutch slip.

 

OP, it sounds like your clutch is done. 

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This is REAL basic. If your clutch is engaged and engine is revving up but the tire isn't speeding up your clutch is slipping, period. Cars do exactly the same thing.

Now is the time to check your clutch lever free play. You need just a bit of looseness so that the cable isn't at tension on the clutch arm. If you got some free play and it's still slipping then your clutch is done.

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This is REAL basic. If your clutch is engaged and engine is revving up but the tire isn't speeding up your clutch is slipping, period. Cars do exactly the same thing.

Now is the time to check your clutch lever free play. You need just a bit of looseness so that the cable isn't at tension on the clutch arm. If you got some free play and it's still slipping then your clutch is done.

it's a hydraulic clutch, and I think it is slipping cause I'm givin er gas an all it's doing is revvin out and not giving me any power
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That's pure internet BS. There's not an automotive oil on the shelf that will make your clutch slip.

 

OP, it sounds like your clutch is done. 

 

well I have personally seen a clutch, that was on it last legs anyways, start slipping bad with a friction modified oil. worked fine again after the oil was changed back to rotella.

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So you saw a worn out clutch slip, and that's the fault of the oil... :rolleyes:

 

Just an FYI, ALL oils have "friction modifiers", including Rotella. At the very least they have boundary agents such as molybdenum and zinc and phosphorous. And diesel oils have far more additives in them than any automotive oil, things like soot dispersants that automotive oils don't need.

 
There's a lot of myths about oils that are or not suitable for our machines, and most of them have absolutely no factual basis.
 
"Don't use an energy Conserving oil or your clutch will slip."
 
"You must use a JASO MA rated oil in your engine or you'll cause premature failure and wear."
 
The myth about automotive oils making your clutch slip started when the Energy Conserving (EC) standard came into being. EC oils have much lower levels of zinc and phosphorous, because these additives can damage a catalytic converter. And the word moly automatically makes people think that the moly additive will cause buildup on the plates which will lead to slippage. But the truth is there is nothing wrong with oils that contain moly, and in fact many motorcycle-specific oils contain moly. I have yet to see any evidence to show that any so-called "friction-modified" (Energy Conserving, or EC) oil will cause any problems. In fact, all engine oils have friction modifiers of some sort in them. the Energy Conserving designation (EC) was devised to denote oils that met new emissions standards requiring lower levels of phosphorous. the EC standard is about emissions, not friction.
 
Since the standard requires a reduction in useful additives such as phosphorous and zinc, the manufacturers had to come up with replacements. One of the additives that the oil engineers can use to bring the lubrication properties back to the level that it was with the higher levels of phosphorus is molybdenum (moly).
 
 
The problem with the belief that the moly additive will make clutches slip is that oil companies don't use the form of moly that would cause this problem, Molybdenum Disulfide MoS2. That type of moly is typically used for the formulation of industrial gear lubes, chain lubes, and greases, not engine or transmission oils.
 
Engine oil formulators use Molybdenum DialkyldiThioCarbamate. This formulation of moly has been proven in both lab testing and actual use to not cause clutch problems at any level you are ever going to find in an oil bottle.
 
The funny thing is, many people will start beating the "moto-specific-oil" drum, and try to tell you that if you don't use motorcycle oil, your clutch will slip. But in fact, many JASO MA rated (certified for use in a wet-clutch environment) moto-specific oils contain levels of moly that are much higher than any EC-rated automotive oil. So if it's bad in an automotive oil, why then is it perfectly acceptable in a motorcycle oil?
 
Even the JASO MA rating is itself a scam in my opinion. All it means is that an oil has been submitted for certification as to it's ability to operate in a wet clutch environment. That does not, however, mean that a non- JASO MA oil will not perform equally well in the same wet-clutch environment. Many oils are simply not submitted for this certification, beca7use the manufacturers are not specifically targeting the motorcycle market, so they do not wish to invest the time and money required to obtain that certification. And in fact, there are more than a few motorcycle specific oils on the market that do not have the JASO MA certification.
 
Most any oil will be acceptable in your tranny, as long as it is changed at reasonable intervals. the problem is, what would be considered a reasonable interval for any other engine is not a reasonable interval for our bikes. the real enemy of oil in our trannies is in contamination from the clutch, and viscosity-shear from the gear teeth. the only solution for those problems is frequent oil changes. In most cases, choosing an oil that your budget allows you to change frequently is better than choosing a much more expensive oil that you aren't willing to change as often because of the high cost.
 
So called "diesel" oils are nothing more than automotive oils with a more robust additive package, especially higher detergent levels. Some of the best performing oils that you can find for our trannies are diesel oils such as Delo and Rotella T. And some of those high-dollar "boutique" moto-specific oils will shear out of viscosity faster than a standard off-the-shelf auto oil. Most oils will shear out of viscosity in our transmissions, under race conditions, in as little as 4 hours. If that doesn't convince you of the need for frequent changes, then nothing will.
 
When I was younger and competed seriously, I used to do UOA (used oil analysis) testing. It's a useful tool that can tell you a lot about the condition of your oil and engine, and whether or not you are using an appropriate oil, changing it often enough, etc. One consistent finding was that, most oils would stay in viscosity for up to four hours in our trannies under race conditions. Beyond four hours nearly all oils began to shear out of viscosity at rapid rates, and price points had no bearing on this. Expensive "motorcycle specific" oils often sheared out of viscosity sooner than cheap off-the-shelf generic oils.
 
Of all the oils I used, Rotella stayed in viscosity longest, but ATF was by far the king in that regard. ATF will resist molecular shearing in a wet-clutch tranny far longer than any engine oil.
 
And so I use ATF type F in my two-stroke trannies. It's an excellent choice for a wet clutch environment, it has better thermal stability and shear resistance than most engine oils. It's also very cheap, so I change it often. You can also use gear oil, or any good engine oil. How often you change it is more important than what you put in it.
 
I use the ATF in my KX250. For my YZ250F, I used Shell Rotella 10W40. I change it every 3-4 hours.
 
Of course, there will always be the nay-sayers that will swear that you are leading your machine to an early death if you don't run those so-called "moto-specific" JASO MA oils, or that you are going to do damage to your clutch. And that's just such a crock. there are many motorcycle oils that do not have the JASO MA rating, as well as many automotive oils that meet or exceed the same standards but simply haven't been submitted for certification because they aren't targeted at the motorcycle market. But, since so many dealers (that make a huge profit on oil sales) try to convince riders that they are doing their machines a disservice by not using these products, and the myth is perpetuated on sites such as this, the debate goes on and on...and it will probably never be resolved. But if running that high-dollar moto-specific oil makes you feel better, then by all means, use it, there's something to be said for the feel-good factor, after all.
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Last few days I've really been feathering the clutch a lot and it was on its way out before I think too, I've always used bel ray 80w but this time I used 75w cause it's all the dealer had, it just started up all of a sudden and I thought it was just wheelspin. I am a bit low on cash at the moment so I've gotta see what I can do. Still have the good ol 230 for just this reason

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well I have personally seen a clutch, that was on it last legs anyways, start slipping bad with a friction modified oil. worked fine again after the oil was changed back to rotella.

I've never tried rotella. Heard of it but what's it like as an oil and is it the cheap stuff or top dollar

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^^^good post, I use ATF in my bikes,(because it is cheap and so am I:))only clutch problems I've had where caused by worn disks, grooved basket or poor adjustment.

 

I use ATF for everything. Engine oil, fork oil, shock oil.. I'd use it on pancakes, but 927 works better :D

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So you saw a worn out clutch slip, and that's the fault of the oil... :rolleyes:

 

I still find it odd that i can find pages of bikes that have clutches suddenly start slipping after changing oils. must be a hell of an internet conspiracy!

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=changed+oil+motorcycle+clutch+slipping&rlz=1C1TSNP_enUS510US510&oq=changed+oil+motorcycle+clutch+slipping&aqs=chrome..69i57j0.11520j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#q=change+oil+motorcycle+clutch+slipping&safe=off&spell=1

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