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hi there I just purchased a 2002 450 R . It has low hours and was very well maintained . coming from a drz400 this bike is well let me say ... Wow!

I think the carb or jet needs to be cleaned as if you take the chock of it stalls out unless the bike is moving..

Really what I'm concerned about the is there is a small dent on the frame just above the skid plate . I checked the frame over very well there are no cracks in the welds or any signs of it being bent or broken. The dent is not very big but I'm worried because it's in the frame is this a big deal?

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Well .. If it's a small dent with no fracture , it should be fine .

 

Yes small dent, no fracture. 

 

What oil is best for my year and model

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has anyone used to be acerbis handguards ... any suggestion on what model or type to get

I just ordered some a few days ago and mine Havnt came it yet.

Me and my buddy were at cycle gear earlier and I picked up a set that looped and connected to the end of the bars, that kind. Anyways and he said"yeah I'll never get another set if those, the last set I got like that I went over the bars and broke both of my wrest".. Just somethin to think about. I ordered the acerbis ones on rockymountmc for 89 bucks I think

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I just ordered some a few days ago and mine Havnt came it yet.

Me and my buddy were at cycle gear earlier and I picked up a set that looped and connected to the end of the bars, that kind. Anyways and he said"yeah I'll never get another set if those, the last set I got like that I went over the bars and broke both of my wrest".. Just somethin to think about. I ordered the acerbis ones on rockymountmc for 89 bucks I think

I noticed that they have multiple models of the acerbis brush guards though . what kind did you get

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I noticed that they have multiple models of the acerbis brush guards though . what kind did you get

The endurance ones 79.99

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for the transmission

700-750cc in the engine

750-850cc in the transmission the latter being recommended.

 

for the engine you can use what ever 10-30 10-40 15-30 15-40 oil you like

Shell Rotella T is a popular choice

so is the Honda brand oil

Personally i use mobil 1 turbo diesel truck oil.

 

for the transmission you can use engine

two stroke gear oil which the motorcycle shop carries, brands like Motoul, Golden Spectro, and Honda all have specific transmission oils.

any oil that say safe to use in wet clutches,"

or the API SG or JASO MA

some say to avoid SJ or SL oils that they will make the clutch slip

you can use the shell rotella

lots of people use good old ATF, cheap or expensive

personally i use Mobil 1 synthetic ATF. works for me.

 

 

 

this posted by member chokey

 

The Great oil Debate

There's a lot of myths about oils that are or not suitable for our machinesicon1.png, and most of them have absolutely no factual basis.

"Don't use an energyicon1.png Conserving oil or your clutch will slip."

"You must use a JASO MA rated oil in your engine or you'll cause premature failure and wear."

The myth about automotiveicon1.png oils making your clutch slip started when the Energy Conserving (EC) standard came into being. EC oils have much lower levels of zinc and phosphorous, because these additives can damage a catalytic converter. And the word moly automatically makes people think that the moly additive will cause buildup on the plates which will lead to slippage. But the truth is there is nothing wrong with oils that contain moly, and in fact many motorcycle-specific oils contain moly. I have yet to see any evidence to show that any so-called "friction-modified" (Energy Conserving, or EC) oil will cause any problems. In fact, all engine oils have friction modifiers of some sort in them. the Energy Conserving designation (EC) was devised to denote oils that met new emissions standards requiring lower levels of phosphorous. the EC standard is about emissions, not friction.

Since the standard requires a reduction in useful additives such as phosphorous and zinc, the manufacturers had to come up with replacements. One of the additives that the oil engineers can use to bring the lubrication properties back to the level that it was with the higher levels of phosphorus is molybdenum (moly).


The problem with the belief that the moly additive will make clutches slip is that oil companies don't use the form of moly that would cause this problem, Molybdenum Disulfide MoS2. That type of moly is typically used for the formulation of industrial gear lubes, chain lubes, and greases, not engine or transmission oils.

Engine oilicon1.png formulators use Molybdenum DialkyldiThioCarbamate. This formulation of moly has been proven in both lab testing and actual use to not cause clutch problems at any level you are ever going to find in an oil bottle.

The funny thing is, many people will start beating the "moto-specific-oil" drum, and try to tell you that if you don't use motorcycle oil, your clutch will slip. But in fact, many JASO MA rated (certified for use in a wet-clutch environment) moto-specific oils contain levels of moly that are much higher than any EC-rated automotive oil. So if it's bad in an automotive oil, why then is it perfectly acceptable in a motorcycle oil?

Even the JASO MA ratingicon1.png is itself a scam in my opinion. All it means is that an oil has been submitted for certification as to it's ability to operate in a wet clutch environment. That does not, however, mean that a non- JASO MA oil will not perform equally well in the same wet-clutch environment. Many oils are simply not submitted for this certification, beca7use the manufacturers are not specifically targeting the motorcycle market, so they do not wish to invest the time and money required to obtain that certification. And in fact, there are more than a few motorcycle specific oils on the market that do not have the JASO MA certification.

Most any oil will be acceptable in your tranny, as long as it is changed at reasonable intervals. the problem is, what would be considered a reasonable interval for any other engine is not a reasonable interval for our bikes. the real enemy of oil in our trannies is in contamination from the clutch, and viscosity-shear from the gear teeth. the only solution for those problems is frequent oil changes. In most cases, choosing an oil that your budget allows you to change frequently is better than choosing a much more expensive oil that you aren't willing to change as often because of the high cost.

So called "dieselicon1.png" oils are nothing more than automotive oils with a more robust additive package, especially higher detergent levels. Some of the best performing oils that you can find for our trannies are diesel oils such as Delo and Rotella T. And some of those high-dollar "boutique" moto-specific oils will shear out of viscosity faster than a standard off-the-shelf auto oil. Most oils will shear out of viscosity in our transmissions, under race conditions, in as little as 4 hours. If that doesn't convince you of the need for frequent changes, then nothing will.

I Use ATF type F in my two-stroke trannies. It's an excellent choice for a wet clutch environment, it has better thermal stability and shear resistance than most engine oils. It's also very cheap at $1.29 a quart, so I change it after every ride. You can also use gear oil, or any good engine oil. How often you change it is more important than what you put in it.

I use the ATF in my KX250. For my YZ250F, I use Shell Rotella 10W40. I change it every 3-4 hours.

Of course, there will always be the nay-sayers that will swear that you are leading your machine to an early death if you don't run those so-called "moto-specific" JASO MA oils, or that you are going to do damage to your clutch. And that's just such a crock. there are many motorcycle oils that do not have the JASO MA rating, as well as many automotive oils that meet or exceed the same standards but simply haven't been submitted for certification because they aren't targeted at the motorcycle market. But, since so many dealers (that make a huge profit on oil sales) try to convince riders that they are doing their machines a disservice by not using these products, and the myth is perpetuated on sites such as this, the debate goes on and on...and it will probably never be resolved. But if running that high-dollar moto-specific oil makes you feel better, then by all means, use it, there's something to be said for the feel-good factor, after all.was

 

 

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replace pilot jeticon1.pngicon1.png, with a new one.

or you can do what i do, my jet reamers are not small enough so i separate a strand of copper wire from some 12ga wire i have laying around, stick it through the jet, get some wire cutters and kind of notch the wire 3 or 4 times down the length to make serrations do them 60* or 90* from each other so that it has them on all sides of the wire and drag it back through the jet, spray out with b12 chem tool and compressed airicon1.png and repeat.

 

also remove the fuel screw, and blow chem tool and compressed air both ways through every circuit in the carburetor

its a good idea to also do the accelerator pump circuit, ensure the nozzle is clear and check the condition of your pump diaphragm

 

you could buyicon1.png a rnd flex screw or merge long fuel screw.

and read about how to get the pilot circuit dialed in this will help you select the correct pilot jet

its been posted you want to use the low slide method

 

and every bike older than 2 years i like to replace the vacuum release plate seal

Yamaha is the only brandicon1.png that sells it separately

Yamaha part number

4FN-14997-00-00

http://www.kawasakip...64fe/carburetor

its number 11

 

but for your bike being a 2002

i would buy this

VALVE SET, FLOATING
honda part number
16037-MEB-671
number 16
 

and i would replace the accelerator pump diaphragm even if it looked okay who knows how old it is.

DIAPHRAGM SET, PUMP
Honda part number
16021-KRN-671
number 11 on the previous link
 

 

be careful to note the direction of the seal when you remove the old one, its a good idea to lightly coaticon1.png the seal in silicone o-ring greaseicon1.png.

every bike i have replaced the seal in responded by requiring different idle settings and after that had better starting and idle characteristics and off idle response :)

 

a merge accelerator pump spring or ap o-ring mod is a good idea too. but completely unrelated to your problem.

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