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Addressing oversteer on YZ 125...

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I am experiencing some significant oversteer issues on my 06 YZ 125.  Here are the specs:

1. Sprung for my weight (5.0 KG shock and .43 fork)

2. Sag right in the middle of manual specified range (3.5 -3.9")

3. Fork height in clamps stock (right at the groove mark in the top of the forks)

4. Pirelli tires at both ends (great tires so grip does not seem to be an issue)

5. HSC on shock at stock setting, rebound at both ends stock, compression clickers backed out (the bike is being riding in the woods)

 

Compared to my other bikes (Suzuki RM and KTM SX), when riding at race pace I consistently find myself well inside my intended line, to the point where I am coming into contact with obstacles on the inside (e.g., bars are catching tree trunks or branches, hitting rocks at the side of the single track trail).  What would be the best way to address this issue?  Everything else about the bike is great, so I want to keep the changes minimal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Seems to be a good problem to have on the yz.  They tend to push the front and be a little difficult to get turned at times.  Adjust your riding habits and give it less input and youll be golden.  And yes I also think closer to 4" on the sag is more in line. 

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Adding to what others have mentioned....its not a RM or SX! One of the great things about the YZs is they handle extremely well, they just don't turn as quick. The RM and SX will turn inside the YZ but neither of them will be as stable as the YZ. Its kind of a give and take....If you want it to turn like a RM, buy a RM. I also cannot recall a KTM 2t that doesn't require a steering stabilizer....

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Raise the front of the bike and lower the rear. It's that simple.  If if also happens on flat smooth turns, then it's not the damper setup.

 

Since you have so little sag, that's the first thing to try. Lower the rear.

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Those guys are right, probably worth trying a little more sag on that bike.

I'm at 100mm sag on my stock suspension and with my revalved setup these days and I love it.

 

Some combinations of chain/sprockets also move your axle forward into the swing arm.  That 1/2" difference can be felt.

The question you should ask yourself is also about where in the corner you're having an issue...

 

If it's maintaining the corner too long (after apex) consider testing with about 4 clicks out on your fork rebound.
If it's turning too quick all the way through, drop that rear end down with the sag set at 100mm - 105 mm.
 

I have tried as little as 98mm and it was too quick on my 2008.


 

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I don't know what happened to my previous post, but yes, I did try some more sag on Sunday, and it improved the steering, and the stability, considerably.  I thought the specifications in the manual seemed like too little sag, but normally I follow what the manual specifies.  I'm just under 100mm sag now, and it feels pretty good.

 

Next thing on the list is a good woods revalve! 

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