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1982 XR200R rebound adjustment?

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I just got a 1982 XR200R. From what I have read, there are supposed to be four rebound settings at the base of the shock.

When I turn mine there are distinct clicks but no stopping point in either direction. Is it just cycling between the four settings or is there supposed to be a stopping point?

I may be imagining things but it seems like one of clicks results in more of a sound like the flow of oil is being constricted. It is difficult for me to see if the bike actually comes up faster. I may have to video it and measure the speed of rebound.

I have a factory service manual that says nothing about rebound adjustment but no owner's manual that apparently does cover this.

Thanks!

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As Vortec pointed out the knob doesn't always work the way it should.

 

I can't remember the if there are any difference between the early and late versions but my experience with the 84-91 shocks:

 

The knob turns a rod/needle, the end which controls a small bypass orifice in the rebound circuit, e.g. a bleed that bypasses the rebound valving.  This bleed affects low speed damping but there is small amount of residual effect on high speed damping like sharp edge bumps, but most noticeable is the affect on chassis attitude during braking/acell or whoops.  

 

Four marks on the knob indicating rebound damping. The marks are not very visable, I exaggerate mine with a Dremel. "I" is least, "IV" the most (or is it "IIII").

 

The knob fits to the rod in one of two positions so look careful at its position before removing or you could inadvertently install it 180 degrees out.

 

Between the knob and shock clevice are spring loaded balls for the detent action, they can become fouled by dirt so you can't feel the detents but the adjustment will still work.

 

As the shock piston (and/or bore) wears shock fluid will internally bypass the piston in large enough quantities to make the rebound adjuster ineffective, and making the shock feel like it has lost rebound damping. If the bike still feels like a Pogo stick on 4 then it is shock rebuild time or at least new shock fluid.

The factory fluid in these shocks doesn't seem to hold up well and should be replaced.

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the early showa shock does not use a needle.  There is a small disk built into the nut that holds the the piston on the shock shaft.  This disk has 4 different sized holes in it, when you turn the adjuster it rotates this disk and lines up one of the holes to allow for bleed.  There is no stop in the system and it can be turned indefinately.  I rebuilt my '82 shock this winter and used 7w oil in it.  The adjuster makes a big difference on a rebuilt shock. 

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the early showa shock does not use a needle.  There is a small disk built into the nut that holds the the piston on the shock shaft.  This disk has 4 different sized holes in it, when you turn the adjuster it rotates this disk and lines up one of the holes to allow for bleed.  There is no stop in the system and it can be turned indefinately.  I rebuilt my '82 shock this winter and used 7w oil in it.  The adjuster makes a big difference on a rebuilt shock. 

 

Ah ha! Chadzu, you are truly a guru. This explains what I am seeing. I will go ride it on the four settings.

 

I'm thinking given the age and unknown history of this bike that a rebuild may be in order. Not something I will do myself. Would you guys recommend Race Tech or ?

 

Thanks very much!

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With a shop manual and some info on TT you could do an oil change yourself and then take it to a dealer or suspension shop to have it recharged.  Racetech does have dealers which will save you shipping cost, or a local suspension shop.  You can ask on TT for recommendations.  One risk with early shocks is wear of the bore, later shocks have harder bores but I don't know when things changed.  But a tech would be able to check  the bore.

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On the rebuild, it is fairly straight forward.  Unless the shock is really thrashed you can probably get away with reusing the seal head and just clean and refill.  I don't like the procedure that Honda has in the manual.  I found and alternate procedure here on this sight somewhere while searching the subject.  Honda wants you to take the hose apart to fill, the alternate way keeps it all intact. If you get that far and can't find it I'll try and put it into words.

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I saw another post stating that there are numbers on the dial. I looked with strong light and there are: 1 through 4! I marked them with colored paint.

 

I went riding with #3 (slower rebound, with #4 the slowest) and liked it.

 

Combined with backing off the preload from 5 mm *beyond* the recommended "firm" position to just firm (-5 mm) I think the stock suspension is now working pretty well. I am 178 lbs (~205 lbs in complete gear including pack).

 

I will eventually get emulators and have the shock rebuilt but not high priorities for now. Thanks again. 

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