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My Bike Went For A Swim Need Help

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So I went for a little swim with my bike in nasty muddy puddle. It came up on me quick and I hit the brakes but it was to late. Anyway I went over the bars and the bike fell over on the muffler side. The bike is a CRF 150f by the way. Once we  dragged it out we tried to start it but a no go. That's where the fun began. About 1 hour of pushing it through the Florida sand the bike did start about 45 minutes into the walk but when we gave it gas it would just die. When we got back to the truck we checked the air box and it was dry and we pulled it up on the back wheel and water came out of the muffler.

 

So this is what I've done so far

 

* pulled it up on the back wheel  twice to get water out of muffler. Water did come out.

* pulled spark plug and flipped bike over. Spark plug was dry and no water came out of the engine. I did kick it over a few times when it was up side down.

* drained the carb from the flote bowl and drained all of the gas out the tank from the pet cock

* drained oil twice. 1st time it was very milky.That is the oil from the bike in the pic from when I fell. 2nd time I ran it for a few minutes and drained again. The oil looked much better. the oil has a lot of what look like dirt in it. I plan on draining it at least once more.

* cleaned air filter.

 

The boot connected to the carb was dry so I don't think any water got in there. I'm pretty sure the bike shut off when I went flying. It seems like all of the water just got in from the muffler. No to the problem. The bike has good compression and starts with in a couple of kicks. It idles fine but if I try to give it any gas it stalls right away. So where to i go from here? Oh yah the front wheel is twisted but I think the forks just moves in the triple clamps. I hope.

 

Thanks

 

WP_20140426_001.jpg

Edited by gmurr

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Drain it a couple of more times. Should be fine. I'd be willing to bet there was water in the pipe and you sucked it in trying to start it, so that explains the oil.

Should be good.

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Drain it a couple of more times. Should be fine. I'd be willing to bet there was water in the pipe and you sucked it in trying to start it, so that explains the oil.

Should be good.

Thanks! Should I run the bike for a few minutes when I change the oil or just put new oil in and drain it?

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Thanks! Should I run the bike for a few minutes when I change the oil or just put new oil in and drain it?

Run it and ride it to get it circulated around. Ride it so it's nice and warmed up them drain it again.

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Run it and ride it to get it circulated around. Ride it so it's nice and warmed up them drain it again.

 

I thought he couldn't give it gas?

 

 

try turning your idle up and see if it will hold up to that.

 

it just bogs everytime you give it little throttle?

 

im also helping bump this for someone more knowledgeable as well..

 

maybe try starting it leave it idle, push it down a hill and throw it in gear.

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water in the carb or accelerator pump, or a clogged main jet. Run it on choke and blip the throttle lots with out letting it die and it will clear out eventually if its water.

 

the water in your oil simply came from the crank case breather tube being underwater.

Edited by Wild Alaskan

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Take bowl off carb and clean it out!  Otherwise, you could end up with corrosion or blockage which will lead to a lean condition and you will burn a hole in your piston!  After you rebuild your engine, you will still have to clean the carb, so do it now. 

 

Or, just take a shortcut like suggested above.

Edited by Still Bill

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i wouldn't worry about a corrosion blockage too much, brass is pretty hardy in that respect, I have had grape juice sitting in my carb for a week once, and in a separate incident antifreeze. Both times cleared out in the way I described (because I'm lazy). Really though its a good idea to clean the carb anyways, a bunch of dirt could have washed up the vent tubes with the water.

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Water in the carb.

I'm pretty sure the carb stayed dry and I did open the bolt on the bottom and turned the gas on to flush it out. I guess I need to pull it off and clean it?

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My friends Honda 230f did the exact same symptom when he had pilot jet plugged. I am guessing muddy water went backwards up one of the drain hoses into the bowl. Remove carb and all jets and blow out all passages with good air compressor. A lazy man may want to just remove the bowl and blow carb cleaner into some jets, go the full mile.

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 I have a WR450 that I completely drowned once. It sounds like you lucked out as I did and the motor cut with the valves closed; hence no water from the sparkplug hole.

 What you did with the oil change is on the right track. If you’ve been riding it since you may want to consider this method as it will do the best job of cleaning everything out save a complete teardown.

 First do all the carb cleaning, air filter cleaning/changing and exhaust draining as necessary (sounds like you already have this covered).

 Next go buy about four changes worth of the cheapest oil you can find. Don’t worry about legit motorcycle oil; just get the lowest grade automotive oil you can. Next pick up some kerosene and then get two new filters and enough GOOD oil for two changes.

 

 Step one – drain all your water fouled oil and fill the bike back with a mixture of 90% kerosene and 10% cheap oil. Run the bike for no more than two minutes then cut the motor and immediately drain.

 Next, Put in one of your new filters and repeat with 50/50 mix of kerosene and cheap oil.

 Now go to 25% kerosene (same filter).

 Now you want to repeat this cycle with 100% cheap oil until you see that there is no water left in the system. The drained oil should not look at all milky and you should see no water drops running across your oil catcher.

 Now put your second new filter in and do two changes of good oil and you’re done.

 

  The kerosene will clean everything out as it’s more solvent like than oil and it won’t damage the motor as long as you don’t run it too long. I had so much water in my case that it actually spewed out of the oil fill hole when I took the cap out (I had started the motor after draining the pipe in order to make it back to the truck – not ordinarily recommended). It took six changes to get it all clear.

 

 

 If you get water in the cylinder it’s no good. If it’s muddy water it’s really no good and if it’s muddy, sandy water it’s really, really no good. You can try flipping it over and draining it and the blowing air in it (while upside down) to get ALL debris out but dirt and sand are little micro rocks that will jack the cylinder walls up pretty good. There’s also a chance that if anything is left in there loose then it will blow out the exhaust but the only way to be sure is a teardown. The initial indicator that water got into the cylinder is that it will be hydro-locked. Do NOT try to force it to turn over or you risk damaging the connecting rod. Wait until you get the sparkplug out.

 

 Good luck – it sounds like you should be okay.  

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 I have a WR450 that I completely drowned once. It sounds like you lucked out as I did and the motor cut with the valves closed; hence no water from the sparkplug hole.

 What you did with the oil change is on the right track. If you’ve been riding it since you may want to consider this method as it will do the best job of cleaning everything out save a complete teardown.

 First do all the carb cleaning, air filter cleaning/changing and exhaust draining as necessary (sounds like you already have this covered).

 Next go buy about four changes worth of the cheapest oil you can find. Don’t worry about legit motorcycle oil; just get the lowest grade automotive oil you can. Next pick up some kerosene and then get two new filters and enough GOOD oil for two changes.

 

 Step one – drain all your water fouled oil and fill the bike back with a mixture of 90% kerosene and 10% cheap oil. Run the bike for no more than two minutes then cut the motor and immediately drain.

 Next, Put in one of your new filters and repeat with 50/50 mix of kerosene and cheap oil.

 Now go to 25% kerosene (same filter).

 Now you want to repeat this cycle with 100% cheap oil until you see that there is no water left in the system. The drained oil should not look at all milky and you should see no water drops running across your oil catcher.

 Now put your second new filter in and do two changes of good oil and you’re done.

 

  The kerosene will clean everything out as it’s more solvent like than oil and it won’t damage the motor as long as you don’t run it too long. I had so much water in my case that it actually spewed out of the oil fill hole when I took the cap out (I had started the motor after draining the pipe in order to make it back to the truck – not ordinarily recommended). It took six changes to get it all clear.

 

 

 If you get water in the cylinder it’s no good. If it’s muddy water it’s really no good and if it’s muddy, sandy water it’s really, really no good. You can try flipping it over and draining it and the blowing air in it (while upside down) to get ALL debris out but dirt and sand are little micro rocks that will jack the cylinder walls up pretty good. There’s also a chance that if anything is left in there loose then it will blow out the exhaust but the only way to be sure is a teardown. The initial indicator that water got into the cylinder is that it will be hydro-locked. Do NOT try to force it to turn over or you risk damaging the connecting rod. Wait until you get the sparkplug out.

 

 Good luck – it sounds like you should be okay.  

Thanks for the post. I've  changed the oil twice and I planned on doing it again draining it into a clear container to make sure their is no debris or water in it. The bike is now starting and running when I give it gas. Woohoo. I have mineral spirits in the garage will that work the same as the kerosen? The air box was completely dry when I checked after going for a swim and the gas had no water in it either. Do you think I should still clean the carb? I have never cleaned the carb but I've heard it's not to hard. Can the water come back up from the bottom of the motor?

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 I’m not sure about mineral spirits. I know kerosene works ...and it’s cheap. Since you’ve made a couple changes already you could probably get by starting with the 50/50 mix. Don't forget the new filter.  

 

 I wouldn’t think that you’d have to clean the carb if the air box was dry after the ‘incident’. Cleaning carbs isn’t too hard; especially if you’re mechanically inclined. Like everything though, it all has to go back together just right and you must be spotless clean about it. Get the shop manual for your bike and read over the procedures. Read up about adjustments on sites like this. There’s so much info here it’s unreal. I wish there had been an info source like this when I was learning.

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This thread should be pinned, all good info everyone will need sometime as a rider.

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