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Should I lean forward when going over a steep jump?

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There's this steep jump at my local track, and I want to properly jump it, but I have been nervous that the bike will flip backwards and I will land on my back when the bike leaves the jump. When going over steep jumps, do you have to lean forward to prevent it from flipping?

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There's this steep jump at my local track, and I want to properly jump it, but I have been nervous that the bike will flip backwards and I will land on my back when the bike leaves the jump. When going over steep jumps, do you have to lean forward to prevent it from flipping?

 

The answer to your question depends on many variables.  Unfortunately you won't truly know the answer until you jump it, over and over again.  That is how your brain learns all the proper muscle movements and when they need to happen.  Your brain will use the experience of previous jumps to make the proper muscle movements and adjustments on future jumps and build up the muscle memory needed for such feats.  Unfortunately for you, it sounds like your memory bank is a little low.

 

The best answer I can give you with out seeing the jump is this... can you watch anybody else jump it?  Can you talk to the ones who are jumping it about speed, body movements, and positioning?  If not then I would recommend you approach it like this... (is it a standing jump or a sitting jump?) roll it first to develop a current sight picture (sounds like you have already done that) then on the next approach, approach it a little faster with the amount of speed that will allow you to land safely in or near the middle.  If it is a deep double then use your best judgement on where to land on your second trial run.  Usually it is just at the base of the back side of the take off.  This will start to build your memory bank of what the face (take off) will feel like.  If jumping into the middle is not an option then proceed to next step.  Approach the section before the jump and the section the jump is in at what you think is the proper speed to execute the jump properly then abort at just the last possible moment before you leave the ground.  Meaning, don't jump it.  Try this approach as many times as it takes before you are ready to pull the trigger and go for it.  

 

As far as your original question about leaning forward and not flipping... you learned how to accelerate with out flipping over, correct?  The basic explanation of jumping is similar, you just got to do it to learn it.  Your body positioning and where you put pressure on the bike will make it do amazing things.  (not to mention all the functions of the mechanical controls you have also) Think scrub, turn down whip, anti-whip, not to even mention all the free style tricks we've seen are all done with different body positioning and pressure applied at different points to the motorcycle.  If you are worried about flipping backwards then start neutral or slightly forward, (think head over the handle bars) then you can adjust much quicker for any situation rather than starting to far forward and needing to get the front back up or vise/versa.     

Edited by kx450f63

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There's this steep jump at my local track, and I want to properly jump it, but I have been nervous that the bike will flip backwards and I will land on my back when the bike leaves the jump. When going over steep jumps, do you have to lean forward to prevent it from flipping?

You do have to lean forward on the face of a steep jump but then as the bike is leaving the jump you have to move in order to maintain the center of balance. If you really want to know all the basic jumping techniques and how to make them become automatic for you watch this DVD preview: http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques

 

Vol 3 DVD 6 240.jpg

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