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2005 kx125 fuel line

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What size of fuel line for a 2005 kx125? I was told 5/16, but is that the inside diameter or outside?

I should have looked first, but where can you buy spring clamps for the fuel line?

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What size of fuel line for a 2005 kx125? I was told 5/16, but is that the inside diameter or outside?

I should have looked first, but where can you buy spring clamps for the fuel line?

 

 

The clamps are special made out of iridium and a combo of alien farts and space dust :|

 

Any hardware store, any auto parts store, a home depot.

 

Just a heads up.  You can take a little piece in with you to get it replaced. Also, the fuel lines do not have any pressure other than gravity on them. I don't think my bike has a single clamp on the fuel lines (at least it doesn't on the filter) and not a single drop leaks, nor do they come off without physically removing them (they are new, tho).

 

I can't recall the size either. I always just bring a piece with me.

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Yes, it's 1/4". Any local auto parts store has it in the lawnmower section. It stiffens up after 6 months or so but 3' is about $4. The hose is only about 6" long. So you'll have plenty. It's the clear fuel line.

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I've been buying my fuel line and vent line from this guy:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-10-Feet-OEM-Tygon-Fuel-Line-1-4-ID-X-3-8-OD-/380874567341?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item58ade4aead

 

The Tygon line isn't supposed to stiffen up.  Seems legit so far.  Watch the 1/8" vent line listings though, one is thin wall. Don't get that one.  

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Yup, 1/4". I like using automotive fuel line. A foot of high pressure line is still dirt cheap and will make a couple of lines for a bike. It's all ethanol compatible and will last forever, unlike most the clear lines.  Even the yellow Tygon hardens up after a while.  The most common Tygon is the 4040, and the manufacturer themselves make no claims to ethanol compatability, although it seems every retailer claims E10 or just "ethanol" compatible. 

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=23487&catid=864

 

 Also, the fuel lines do not have any pressure other than gravity on them. I don't think my bike has a single clamp on the fuel lines (at least it doesn't on the filter) and not a single drop leaks, nor do they come off without physically removing them (they are new, tho).

 

Yes, with the right size hose you should be fine without clamps on a gravity feed system. However, many racing sanctioning bodies require the line be clamped as part of their rules. I've been checked and have checked during tech in AMRA enduro's and harescrambles.

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Yup, 1/4". I like using automotive fuel line. A foot of high pressure line is still dirt cheap and will make a couple of lines for a bike. It's all ethanol compatible and will last forever, unlike most the clear lines.  Even the yellow Tygon hardens up after a while.  The most common Tygon is the 4040, and the manufacturer themselves make no claims to ethanol compatability, although it seems every retailer claims E10 or just "ethanol" compatible. 

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=23487&catid=864

 

 

Yes, with the right size hose you should be fine without clamps on a gravity feed system. However, many racing sanctioning bodies require the line be clamped as part of their rules. I've been checked and have checked during tech in AMRA enduro's and harescrambles.

 

Ahh yes, I don't race so had no idea.  That's a good bit of info tho for people who do, or are wanting to :)  Thanks!

 

It makes sense really for racing application. 

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