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Torque Wrench.. Question On Correct Setting.. Help

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This is a brand new torque wrench that i got from Harbor Freight.. However, I think it may be calibrated a bit off.. Not sure as I have never really used one before.  In the two pictures i provided, which would be 20Ibs of torque?.  Neither setting line up perfectly with the little diagonal line that straightens out its.  Its either a little above or a little below when setting to "0"..  Any info would be appreciated as I want to finish my 602 front flasher install :) sorry about the not so good pics, it was hard to get a good focus

 

photo1_zps06dd8730.jpgphoto2_zps1c486502.jpg

 

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That's normal. Even the nicer ones will be slightly above or below. 

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Just noticed you said you were new to torque wrenches.  So just a few tips:

 

- Never store it with tension on it, once you torque the nut, set the torque wrench back down to 10 or 0 or what ever the lowest setting is.

- If you can avoid it, don't use it like a breaker bar. It's for torqueing nuts, not removing them.

- They aren't as accurate at the extremes of their range. So for little stuff, you may want to pick up a small torque wrench as well.

- If you have to use extensions with high torque use large extensions.

 

Torque wrenches even brand new from the factory tend to be off some, but the average joe in the garage doesn't ever send their torque wrench out to be calibrated. The HF ones aren't the greatest quality, but better than nothing. Even if it's off some, at least the fastners will be tightened "evenly".

Edited by OhioYJ
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Just noticed you said you were new to torque wrenches.  So just a few tips:

 

- Never store it with tension on it, once you torque the nut, set the torque wrench back down to 10 or 0 or what ever the lowest setting is.

- If you can avoid it, don't use it like a breaker bar. It's for torqueing nuts, not removing them.

- They aren't as accurate at the extremes of their range. So for little stuff, you may want to pick up a small torque wrench as well.

- If you have to use extensions with high torque use large extensions.

 

Torque wrenches even brand new from the factory tend to be off some, but the average joe in the garage doesn't ever send their torque wrench out to be calibrated. The HF ones aren't the greatest quality, but better than nothing. Even if it's off some, at least the fastners will be tightened "evenly".

Thanks for the tips man... Ill post some pics once the DRC's are finished :)

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I would be very skeptical of the accuracy with these type of torque wrenches....

I have found them to be inaccurate....usually applying more torque than indicated 

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Harbor freight - bottom brand.  Micrometer adjustment is not to my liking (speed sensitive). No torque wrench is accurate at the low end of the scale.  Second picture is set to 20 ft lb.  You are probably better off without a torque wrench than that one as it will provide a false sense of security.

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I would be very skeptical of the accuracy with these type of torque wrenches....

I have found them to be inaccurate....usually applying more torque than indicated 

 

Yea Harbor Frieght is NOT the place to buy torque wrenches. They are a life time investment find you a Mac Tools or Snap-On truck or try Wright Tool Co.

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Torque wrenches are not supposed to be used at the bottom 10% or top 10% of their scale. Often times once they age a little get dropped or used they become uncalibrated thru out there entire range. I have seen brand new top name brand ones get taken out of the box and be no good.

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Torque wrenches are not supposed to be used at the bottom 10% or top 10% of their scale. Often times once they age a little get dropped or used they become uncalibrated thru out there entire range. I have seen brand new top name brand ones get taken out of the box and be no good.

 

I use this one...IMO, you get what you pay for in torque wrenches....

http://audel.com.au/sidchrome-scmt26921-deflecting-beam-torque-wrench-3-8/

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My 2 tips on micrometer torque wrenches and 1 general tip on tools. Torque wrenches are generally only accurate between 20-80% of the range. Click type micrometer torque wrenches should be exercised 10 times at the intended torque prior to actually torqueing. Harbor Freight = land fill. Most of the rubbish they sell doesn't even make it through a single use. This is China's way to pollute their air and water while at the same time fill our land fills with useless junk. As a mechanic my saying to my friends and family is "Cheap tools for cheap fools, buy a quality tool once and use it for life."  

Edited by Dr. D

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I have a precision instruments 0-250 Ft lb and it is identical to the Snap-on but like half the price. It also does not need to be returned to 0 because its a split beam. Here is a 0-100 Ft lb version of the same.  

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/p-4616-38rdquo-dr-split-beam-click-type-torque-wrench-100-ftlbs.aspx

 

I would buy it but it says 20-100 foot pounds.

 

I need one that does 16.5 foot pounds and 72.5 foot pounds.

 

Any other suggestions in that price range?

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I would buy it but it says 20-100 foot pounds.

 

I need one that does 16.5 foot pounds and 72.5 foot pounds.

 

Any other suggestions in that price range?

You will need 2 separate torque wrenches for those two requirements if you expect accuracy. Torque wrenches are only good within 20-80% of range. I know it sucks! That's why my tool box is full of them. For 16.5 foot lbs you will probably end up with a inch lbs torque wrench and convert inch lb to Ft lb.

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This torque wrench does 5-80ibs.. However, because of how the DRC front bracket is designed you can't get a socket on it but only a standard wrench.  The part where the turn signal connects to blocks any chance of getting a socket wrench on the fork bolts.  With a little tweaking i was able to get one bolt on each torqued down to spec, but had to use a wrench on the other two as there was absolutely no way to get the torque wrench on.. So i just tightened it down until it was snug like the other bolt.

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Oh you have one like mine! It's pretty shitty! Be careful as anything below 20lb does not like to actuate the clicker barely at all(at least on mine). I'm thinking digital.......

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This torque wrench does 5-80ibs.. However, because of how the DRC front bracket is designed you can't get a socket on it but only a standard wrench.  The part where the turn signal connects to blocks any chance of getting a socket wrench on the fork bolts.  With a little tweaking i was able to get one bolt on each torqued down to spec, but had to use a wrench on the other two as there was absolutely no way to get the torque wrench on.. So i just tightened it down until it was snug like the other bolt.

The usable range on that torque wrench is 20-64 Ft lbs no less no more.

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Yea Harbor Frieght is NOT the place to buy torque wrenches. They are a life time investment find you a Mac Tools or Snap-On truck or try Wright Tool Co.

 

 

well, not exactly. 

 

a short summer job last year required having about 30 torque wrenches calibrated at a hi-zoot something-or-other certification shop. the snap ons, macs, and yes, harbor freight twisty things were all the same variance according to the two owners of the company and their employees. that variance is tested at 1/2 the available scale, then 1/4 and 3/4 of scale. it's more important to follow the manufacturers recommendations of wether to lube the bolts, leave them dry, or re-torque to another setting after x amount of days than to buy a hi-zoot torque wrench. 

 

i was surprised at that, but it's logical since they're just twistie things that haven't changed ina  few hundred years. 

 

more importantly, they noted that most folks will OVER TORQUE fasteners, ON PURPOSE, even when the spec is right there in front of them. silly, but human nature i guess. 

 

my suggestion is to compare the feeling of a normal ratchet to that of what a torque wrench reports as 'just right' to the user. enough experience with 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" drive ratchets and the torque wrench can -almost- be forgotten. 

 

try this, it's fun:

 

one ratchet in a vise, adapter between it and a torque wrench. let the buddy set the torque wrench to X ft lbs., and then instruct you to do your best to FEEL it instead of hear it click/beep/whatever. it's a good practice, and beer drinking ensues. 

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