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Steering Stabalizers

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Some of the guys I ride with swear by them, and say its the first thing they get after susspension. Already have susspension, so im trying to decide if Im going to go that route. Anyone have any experiences with them? sell me on them, or turn me away, i want to hear opinions. Thanks guys

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Some of the guys I ride with swear by them, and say its the first thing they get after susspension. Already have susspension, so im trying to decide if Im going to go that route. Anyone have any experiences with them? sell me on them, or turn me away, i want to hear opinions. Thanks guys

if you ride off-road desert type then you'd love it. MX don't need a lot so the Honda style hidden behind the plate is cool. Applied makes clamps designed for Honda stabilizers

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if you ride off-road desert type then you'd love it. MX don't need a lot so the Honda style hidden behind the plate is cool. Applied makes clamps designed for Honda stabilizers

MX needs it as much as Desert, imediate reduction in arm pump and better speed through woops and braking bumps. The Hondog setup no where compares with a Scotts. Gotta love the internet and its 90% of bad advice! 

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MX needs it as much as Desert, imediate reduction in arm pump and better speed through woops and braking bumps. The Hondog setup no where compares with a Scotts. Gotta love the internet and its 90% of bad advice!

no your wrong or you'd see it on every pro bike which you don't. If your suspension is done right these aren't issues anyway. If you have head shake your suspension is not dialed. If you have arm pump learn to grip with legs. Accessories aren't always the answer. Desert racing while tapped out or XC I'd run a Scott's all day long
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    After you have a Scotts Stabalizer and know how to set it up youill never ride without one again. Moto / Woods dosnt matter. Ask http://justinecox.com

     

    And thats the one my buddy's got, the other has a gpr. and they state that like you guys said. less headshake and arm pump. they say they can ride forever without getting tired. and i persoanally disagree about the if you have tuned susspension you wont get head shake, again in MY opinion. because your forks move up and down same with rear shock. the steering dampeners are like shocks for your lateral handle bar movements, and you can adjust them accordingly.Therefore reducing front end swap and excess tiny movements. I want to believe they work, its also just hard for me to justify 500$ on a nice one. ( cheap A$$ )
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We run a GPR V4 on an 11 KX250F and a PC lowering link.  The dial is usually set at 2 which has a noticeable impact on rapid side-to-side front wheel movements, arm pump and one potential endo save.  It is one of those things that you probably won't care much about until you have one, then you won't want to go without.  People who have come off their own bikes to ride this one report a stable platform with no cornering issues.  I would agree that setting suspension clickers/sag (front and rear) properly should be first, lowering link maybe second, fork height should be set correctly, tire pressure, too.  After that, you won't regret getting a stabilizer.    It is there if/when you need it and really not noticeable until you do.

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We run a GPR V4 on an 11 KX250F and a PC lowering link. The dial is usually set at 2 which has a noticeable impact on rapid side-to-side front wheel movements, arm pump and one potential endo save. It is one of those things that you probably won't care much about until you have one, then you won't want to go without. People who have come off their own bikes to ride this one report a stable platform with no cornering issues. I would agree that setting suspension clickers/sag (front and rear) properly should be first, lowering link maybe second, fork height should be set correctly, tire pressure, too. After that, you won't regret getting a stabilizer. It is there if/when you need it and really not noticeable until you do.

great info thank you

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We run a GPR V4 on an 11 KX250F and a PC lowering link. The dial is usually set at 2 which has a noticeable impact on rapid side-to-side front wheel movements, arm pump and one potential endo save. It is one of those things that you probably won't care much about until you have one, then you won't want to go without. People who have come off their own bikes to ride this one report a stable platform with no cornering issues. I would agree that setting suspension clickers/sag (front and rear) properly should be first, lowering link maybe second, fork height should be set correctly, tire pressure, too. After that, you won't regret getting a stabilizer. It is there if/when you need it and really not noticeable until you do.

. What do you notice with the drop link? Always seen it but wasn't sure if worth it.

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. What do you notice with the drop link? Always seen it but wasn't sure if worth it.

 

MXA has recommended the lowering link since forever on the KXF, so I got one.  According to my son, it feels more planted and stable.  He did notice the difference and liked it, so we kept it on.  It also lowers the seat by a few MM, which is good for him because his feet barely touch the ground on starts.  Hole shot device helps here, too.  I know it doesn't always make sense to drop a couple hundred bucks on anything, much less something you aren't sure you will like.  My priority since he was new to the big bikes was to make the thing as stable as I possibly could.  Some would argue that seat time is the best investment you could make, and I would agree.  I would also agree that money spent on a truly good helmet vs. any mods is a better investment, too.  If you have enough for those two, making the bike as comfortable for you as you can seems to be a wise investment.  Hope that helps.

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I think a steering damper, or stabilizer, is like most things moto related: rider preference. 

 

I have been using a Scotts damper on my '13 and to me it is totally worth the purchase.  I ride off-road only so I don't know how important it would be in moto, but In my opinion, it has saved me from some nasty crashes.  Have you ever clipped a root or rock while cornering at speed?  I have hit roots in corners and rocks and even ruts and these things help keep the bike in line and prevent your front end from deflection.  Proper suspension setup is most critical, and you should get correct spring rates and sag/setup first.  

 

I know theses things are expensive, but so is a trip to the ER.  In off-road it seems to help me last longer and become less fatigued in the arms and hands during long races.  Some riders are very talented and probably don't really need one, but to me it gives me piece of mind knowing that the bars won't suddenly get jerked out of my hands if I clip a tree or hit a root in the trail that I didn't see.  Also once you buy one, you can transfer it from bike to bike with the purchase of a different clamp for the specific bike.  Once you get used to riding with one, you will really notice if you ride someone elses bike that doesn't have one.

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I think a steering damper, or stabilizer, is like most things moto related: rider preference. 

 

I have been using a Scotts damper on my '13 and to me it is totally worth the purchase.  I ride off-road only so I don't know how important it would be in moto, but In my opinion, it has saved me from some nasty crashes.  Have you ever clipped a root or rock while cornering at speed?  I have hit roots in corners and rocks and even ruts and these things help keep the bike in line and prevent your front end from deflection.  Proper suspension setup is most critical, and you should get correct spring rates and sag/setup first.  

 

I know theses things are expensive, but so is a trip to the ER.  In off-road it seems to help me last longer and become less fatigued in the arms and hands during long races.  Some riders are very talented and probably don't really need one, but to me it gives me piece of mind knowing that the bars won't suddenly get jerked out of my hands if I clip a tree or hit a root in the trail that I didn't see.  Also once you buy one, you can transfer it from bike to bike with the purchase of a different clamp for the specific bike.  Once you get used to riding with one, you will really notice if you ride someone elses bike that doesn't have one.

nice thanks for the info, think im going to get one just not sure what one yet.

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Scotts under bar fully adjustable on the fly. The honda mx one is cool for stock. And in MX You can set up for that track specifically. In desert racing, you run through all terrains so adjustable is the business. Itd be worth it in mx. But widely used in the wild. Abd they last forever. Definitely worth the money. Wind, sand, landing jumps everything...

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