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Motocross, plain and simple

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I've rode for 4 years now, but only woods, I'm just now getting into motocross and it seems like every jump I hit, I nose dive or almost loop out, any advice? I'm 6 feet tall 185 pounds and ride a 2008 crf250rImageUploadedByThumper Talk1398904037.686132.jpg

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Try pulling up on the handlebars and hitting the throttle just before ypur front tire hits the jump. Just act like your going to wheelie before you take flight, then lean back

Most of the time I'm really tense and used to man handling the bike like it's my bitch, should I try and loosen up?

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No stay tense, if your loose, you can go off the jump wrong. Idk i cant really explain it, its just what my body does on its own. I used to have the same problem where my bike would lean too foreward and my front wheel would hit first and it was scary as hell. But just lean back as much as you can, and keep the area behind your toes on the pegs and sit towards the back of the seat when aroching a jump

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I've rode for 4 years now, but only woods, I'm just now getting into motocross and it seems like every jump I hit, I nose dive or almost loop out, any advice? I'm 6 feet tall 185 pounds and ride a 2008 crf250rattachicon.gifImageUploadedByThumper Talk1398904037.686132.jpg

The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump.  What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control.  Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing.  The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction.  This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well.   Key into the compressing and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time.  This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little.  If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle.  If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much.  When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on.

 

See free MX Technique DVD previews and order the DVDs or Streams online. I have 3 Technique DVDs that cover Jumping and Whoops.  The best one for beginners is: http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques

 

Ryan over Gary's head.jpg

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The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump. What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control. Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing. The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction. This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well. Key into the compressing and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time. This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little. If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle. If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much. When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on.

See free MX Technique DVD previews and order the DVDs or Streams online. I have 3 Technique DVDs that cover Jumping and Whoops. The best one for beginners is: http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques

Thanks, good advice, I'll try this weekend when I go to the track

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Is your bike's suspension still setup for woods use? If yes that could contribute to your issue.

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Loosen up. Not to loose where you have no grip. I find when the bike is moving around freely i get into flow with it. Steady throttle up the face of jump will give you a perfect launch and keep you level in the air. Start small and work your way up. I just stiffened my stock suspension up for mx tracks and it has worked nice for me. Dont give a bunch of throttle up the face because you will loop out and dont chop it either because you will nose dive. Try to have fun and dont pressure yourself. It will come with practice. I found that working on your corners is just aa important as jumping. Everyone can jump but not everyone can do the basics of cornering.

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Loosen up. Not to loose where you have no grip. I find when the bike is moving around freely i get into flow with it. Steady throttle up the face of jump will give you a perfect launch and keep you level in the air. Start small and work your way up. I just stiffened my stock suspension up for mx tracks and it has worked nice for me. Dont give a bunch of throttle up the face because you will loop out and dont chop it either because you will nose dive. Try to have fun and dont pressure yourself. It will come with practice. I found that working on your corners is just aa important as jumping. Everyone can jump but not everyone can do the basics of cornering.

Thanks, Good advice man

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Its you, not the bike :) It takes lots of time to get comfortable simple as that.Stay withing your limits, learn how to use the rear brake and clutch in the air to bring the nose down. Seat time is key over anything.When your feel comfortable enough to go bigger things get easier.Small jumps don't give you much time to think, big ones do!

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Its you, not the bike :) It takes lots of time to get comfortable simple as that.Stay withing your limits, learn how to use the rear brake and clutch in the air to bring the nose down. Seat time is key over anything.When your feel comfortable enough to go bigger things get easier.Small jumps don't give you much time to think, big ones do!

Thank, I appreciate it

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