Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Chain Adjustment, Reinstalling Rear Wheel

Recommended Posts

I've been watching tutorials on how to adjust the chain tension after removing/replacing the rear wheel and the videos I've seen say to put tension on the chain when tightening the axle nuts by wedging a wrench between the chain and the rear sprocket.  I don't see why this is necessary.  Can someone explain please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been watching tutorials on how to adjust the chain tension after removing/replacing the rear wheel and the videos I've seen say to put tension on the chain when tightening the axle nuts by wedging a wrench between the chain and the rear sprocket.  I don't see why this is necessary.  Can someone explain please?

 

 

to tighten your chain you want it 3 fingers tight " I make it a hair tighter"

 

loosen your rear wheel bolt, and both sides of your lock nuts. spin your tire backwards and lock a rag in the chain.

 

once you do that tighten your lock nuts on both sides " Make sure they are even with the lines and equal"

 

then tighten your wheel back up and remove the rag.

 

Why you ask?

 

all it does is keep your chain from reloosining and causing you a pain in the ass..

 

again... make sure the lines on each side are the same re tighten 2 lock nuts on each side and your rear wheel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and a wrench? that &%$#@!ing retarted!!!

 

dont wanna do that on your sprocket haha!! next video please.. rag is way more resourceful

 

while your at it clean and wax the chain and sprockets!

 

i baby my bike cleaned and full serviced after every ride except oil depending on how long of a ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still don't see how wedging something between the chain and sprocket is going to hold anything in place. Seems like the tension would pull the wheel in and make the chain more loose. I'm sure ill realize once I actually do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still don't see how wedging something between the chain and sprocket is going to hold anything in place. Seems like the tension would pull the wheel in and make the chain more loose. I'm sure ill realize once I actually do it.

 

you will be spinning your wheel backwards, sucking the rag into the sprocket "Locking it in place"

 

you dont have to do it, i do sometimes sometimes i dont. just depends on preference really.

 

it is a good trick though.

 

you lock it in your back sprocket on the front side on the top. spin the rear wheel backwards with the rag to lock it in

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok. I see.

I noticed the 3-finger rule, but the manual for my CRF230F says 1-3/16 max, which is about 2 fingers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok. I see.

I noticed the 3-finger rule, but the manual for my CRF230F says 1-3/16 max, which is about 2 fingers.

 

you can tighten it that tight if you like, there is a too tight, and a not to tight.

 

if that is what your manual says then it isnt possibly wrong.. i personally go just a bit tighter then 3 fingers but not much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still don't see how wedging something between the chain and sprocket is going to hold anything in place. Seems like the tension would pull the wheel in and make the chain more loose. I'm sure ill realize once I actually do it.

By wedging something in between the sprocket and chain it pulls the adjustment blocks against the adjustment bolts to hold the wheel in the correct spot while you tighten the axle nut. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 fingers is good

 

 

That's what she said :lol:

My manual says 13/16 to 1-13/16 so I think ill go with that.

I'll definitely be giving the chain a good cleaning with some wd-40 and a toothbrush followed by some Belray.

Edited by mossman77
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Checking free play with the bike at normal ride height isn't the best way. 3 fingers for example is no good on something like a CRF230 that has a shorter swingarm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Checking free play with the bike at normal ride height isn't the best way.

 

 

What's the best way then?  The manual says with the bike on a stand, the slack should be between 13/16 and 1-3/16.  Good enough for me.

Edited by mossman77

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the best way then?  The manual says with the bike on the ground, the slack should be between 13/16 and 1-3/16.  Good enough for me.

If your guesstimation is good enough for you by all means disregard the more accurate method.

 

 

When the swingarm is level both sprockets are as far away from each other as they'll ever get.

So if you reach over the bike and grab ahold of the swingarm you can suck it down to level and check free play with the other hand. A tie-down strap works to hold it down if desired.

 

Keeping in mind that loose chains wear sprockets and sliders excessively (and are noisy) and tight chains damage wheel bearings and the countershaft bearing, it is in our best interests to get the chain at neutral tightness at its tightest point. That means loosely snug/ tightly loose = neutral. Free play is a poor way to measure this. Put the bike in gear and turn the wheel backward to isolate chain slack on top. You should have a touch of droop, 1/4"-1/2" or so.

This method is accurate and works on every type of chain and belt drive motorcycle as well as suspended bicycles.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIh-bl6WFCs&feature=player_detailpage

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkVhQkN6VCc&feature=player_detailpage

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand what you're saying, but surely the engineers at Honda took this into consideration when stating there should be 13/16 to 1-13/16 at full droop (full droop meaning suspension fully extended).  They wouldn't expect the consumer to go through this procedure to get the proper adjustment. That would be a little ridiculous.  I'm assuming they obtained the proper slack/tightness with the swing arm in-line, then measured the slack at full droop and got between 13/16 to 1-13/16.  I'll find out soon enough when I change my rear tube this weekend.  I'll set the slack per Honda's recommendation, at full droop, then measure again with the swing arm inline and post the result.

Edited by mossman77

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the chain is on the bike stand or standing upright on its wheels, the chain is always loose looking.  This is because it must be loose at this point of the suspension stroke.  The shock compresses, and the chain actually tightens as the rear end of the bike moves downward.  Get past the mid point of the shock stroke, and the chain will begin to loosen again.  

 

Every bike I've owned since I found out about this (when I was 18), I remove the shock from the bike and put it on the lift stand.  For optimum perfomance, a chain must be as taut as possible without being tightened to the point of stretching.  So I lift the rear wheel up and down freely (because no shock is in place) and make a mental note of which point in the travel the chain tightens to its max.  I tighten the chain to where it's taut at this max tension point (not tight, the chain must have a little wiggle-slack).

 

Then I let the rear wheel go back down to the bottom.  Install shock.  Now I put fingers behind the chain guide while bike is on stand, and make a permanent mental note of how tight the chain is.  I check chain stretch every ride.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahhh, I see. Now that makes perfect sense. Thanks.

It's more or less just a trick used to free up your hands. That way you can measure your axle blocks on each side and tighten the axle without trying to hold the wheel forward with your leg, knocking the bike off the stand .  :foul:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 fingers is good

That's what my wife tells me, if I'm going to do 2 I might as well do three.  As for my chain on my bikes, I do about 2 fingers if that's what we're using as guide here.  You never want to tighten that chain up too much or it wears out faster and risk the chancer of it snapping.  Generally I would suggest no more than an inch play up or down.  Also, depending how much you ride, you should always include chain adjustment at every maintenance interval.  I'm over kill, my chains come off after every ride for inspection, lubrication, and proper re fit.  In my case, I can't afford to snap a chain where I ride, otherwise, I have lot of walking to do to get back to camp. :devil:

Edited by YZ490-DEVIL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know a guy who puts a Phillips screwdriver under the chain at rear of sprocket.  Then, he tightens chain snugly.  Removes screwdriver and slack is perfect.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×