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Newbie Purchased first Used Bike

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Hello All. 

 

We after two weeks of lots of help from TT and private chats, I finally purchased a used http://houston.craigslist.org/mcy/4441036413.html today.

 

Thanks to all to the help. 

 

I am still learning to ride, I never road before and had my first lesson this past Tuesday to cover the basics of throttle control, turning, some break and riding positions. 

 

Just a few questions:

 

1. Any advice for  newbie as far as things to buy? Should I buy bike stand?

 

2. I need help with switching gears. I have driven stick car before and during training I only stayed in 2nd gear. For this bike is it 1st gear down, then rest of gears upwards.

 

3. As far as gear, what do I need besides helmet? Buy used or new helment? A used helment may stink.

 

Thanks

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Sweet bike! Congratulations :thumbsup:

I'm sure you will get plenty of replies, but helmet and boots are a must. Spend most of your budget on them. Get everything else on closeout. Don't buy a used helmet. Stinky is one thing, but if it has been crashed and you don't know it, the protection is compromised.

Bike stands are nice, but also easy to build if you are on a tight budget.

That is an awesome first bike. Well done

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That's a nice bike, I hoped you'd buy it.

 

I'd rate a bike stand as low on the list of necessities. You'll eventually need one though if you are to do some basic maintenance.

Things to buy for the bike: Tie down straps. Basic hand tools if you don't have them already. Filter oil. Tire pump and low pressure guage. Chain wax/lubricant. 

 

Here is a tutorial on shifting gears. I sat through it as long as I could. Be advised that these are crude methods for beginners.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWxhXKjVJxU&feature=player_detailpage

 

Gear: buy new if at all possible. As you said, used gear stinks. I'm not a prude but soaking up some other guys old sweat is way over the line.

Boots, gloves and helmet are the bare minimum. Don't bother riding the bike at all without them. From there you probably want a chest protector, elbow and knee guards, proper dirtbiking pants and a jersey. For sure purchase a Camelbak-type hydration pack. Riding is a workout, you need water.

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like others have mentioned boots, helmet, gloves at top of list but also goggles. Not sunglasses but goggles. You only get one set of eyes.

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goodoboy....take a look at www.motorcycle-superstore.com and www.rockymountainatvmc.com for equipment.  You should be able to find  reasonably priced equipment including helmet, goggles, boots, gloves and knee guards.  I also like the boot selection at www.atomicmoto.com as they have a pretty good range of equipment and a lot of enduro/offroad boots that are better for the riding that I do rather than a lot of the motocross boots that are offered.  For my son, I bought the Gaerne GX-1 that are good tough boots that dont break the bank.  For myself I bought some SIDI boots in the early 80's (yes really) and I just replaced them last year.  So I bought SIDI boots again (They can definitely be very pricey....but if they last as long as my previous pair it will be worth it).

 

Dont even really ride until you have helmet, eye protection and boots.

The first time you dump it over, you will also realize very quickly that some type of knee guards are essential.  I really like these:

 

http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/830/38949/Leatt-Brace-3DF-Knee-Guards?term=leatt

 

but there a lots of other cheaper versions of knee guards

 

Equipment becomes a cascading list as you will see.  Once you have boots and knee guards then you will be thinking you need some riding pants that more easily accommodate boots and knee guards and so on. 

 

My Dad rode for 30+ years and all he ever wore was a helmet, sunglasses, gloves, boots and jeans and he never had any significant injuries other than bruises and scrapes.  And, that waswhile  riding an IT465 here in Colorado over some very rough terrain - but he was a good rider and rode conservatively.

 

One thing that you might try to do....is not go cheap on equipment and then find yourself re-buying what you really want/need down the road. 

 

As for a bike stand, we used the milk crate style stand that held your supplies that when you turned it over you then put your bike up on them.  I still have one of those, but it sure is nice to have bike stand esp at age 52 when I am trying to lift the back of a 270 LB WR450F onto the milk crate.

 

Shifting gears on a dirt bike is the easiest thing in the world.  Hardest part is learning to let out clutch (which you have apparently already mastered in your lesson esp if you are starting out in second gear).  You will see that all you have to do to shift up is let of the throttle briefly (to take tension out of drivetrain), *click" shifter up and then gas it again....you really dont have to use the clutch.  Downshifts you will want to pull in the clutch and *click* it down once and let out clutch.  Nothing to it - you'll see.

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Buy a MANUAL.  :D

 

Download the owners manual. That and a service manual are the most important tools you can own. It will even tell you how your gears shift.

 

http://www.kawasaki-techinfo.net/showOM.php?view_lang=EN&spec=US&book_no=99987-1072&lang_code=EN 

 

Then buy a service manual. PDF versions are cheap, often around $10. Printed versions are almost essential unless you are always working in a clean garage. Both are great and economical.

 

Like everyone else said, never even get on the bike without helmet, goggles, boots, and gloves. Most of us also won't ride without knee guards of some sort.

 

You can ease into specific hand tools over time.

Edited by LSHD
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Awesome bike , These guys are right safety equipment first , you can wear it around the house pretending you're Darth Vader until you get used to it  :lol:  No one has mentioned a neck brace i always wear mine simply because you can't ride with a broken neck. Saves on advil too after you scramble your brain on the trails for hours. You will go through oil, chain lube , and wd-40 ( or like ) pretty quick Buy bulk if you can find it cheap. I run klotz R-50 premix i get it from ebay 50 bucks a Gallon . Need a Ratio Rite . Don't mix without it  :naughty: . 5 gallon bucket will work for a stand until you can pick one up. If you shop wisely you can get good oils for your bike and good gear fairly cheap, look around A lot do your research on product and ask in here for preferences most of the guys here have experienced it already , Rode it , crashed it, blown it up, and rebuilt it.  :thumbsup:

Edited by Beau 88
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Hello All.

We after two weeks of lots of help from TT and private chats, I finally purchased a used http://houston.craigslist.org/mcy/4441036413.html today.

Thanks to all to the help.

I am still learning to ride, I never road before and had my first lesson this past Tuesday to cover the basics of throttle control, turning, some break and riding positions.

Just a few questions:

1. Any advice for newbie as far as things to buy? Should I buy bike stand?

2. I need help with switching gears. I have driven stick car before and during training I only stayed in 2nd gear. For this bike is it 1st gear down, then rest of gears upwards.

3. As far as gear, what do I need besides helmet? Buy used or new helment? A used helment may stink.

Thanks

kudos to you the bike looks very well kept.. Get the best helmet and boots you can afford chest protector goggles.the pants and shirts can wait till you have the money. Try to ride in an open field to learn to shift and turn. Take your time it will all start clicking with practice open fields are a good way to learn brake with your back and front to.
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Thanks everyone for replying,

 

My local mechanic is dealer for some of these equipment and he wants to order the equipment and I pay for it. I am not sure why he was do it, but the prices seems cheaper.

 

Helment:

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/36189/i/fly-racing-trekker-ds-helmet

 

What you think of this helment I want to order? I wear glasses so this should be good.

 

Can you recommend good light boots and a chest protector.

 

Thank you all. 

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Hello All. 

 

We after two weeks of lots of help from TT and private chats, I finally purchased a used http://houston.craigslist.org/mcy/4441036413.html today.

 

Thanks to all to the help. 

 

I am still learning to ride, I never road before and had my first lesson this past Tuesday to cover the basics of throttle control, turning, some break and riding positions. 

 

Just a few questions:

 

1. Any advice for  newbie as far as things to buy? Should I buy bike stand?

 

2. I need help with switching gears. I have driven stick car before and during training I only stayed in 2nd gear. For this bike is it 1st gear down, then rest of gears upwards.

 

3. As far as gear, what do I need besides helmet? Buy used or new helment? A used helment may stink.

 

Thanks

Congrats!  Always nice to see a new member come in with a smoker.  When it comes to gear, it really is going to depend on the type of riding you plan on doing.  Most have already made it clear, it's always helmet, boots, and gloves.  Those are the three items that are basic.  I don't opt myself for all the other fancy gear like chest protectors, knee protectors, hell everything protectors, but that's just me and I'm not discounting it.  Like I said, it depends on the type of riding you plan on doing.  Literally, I could pretty much ride butt naked, so long as I have helmet, boots, and gloves, I'm good to go. Take it slow, be one with your bike.  Know what it can and cannot do, and you'll be just fine.  Welcome and again, congrats, the bike look really nice and well maintained. :devil:

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Congrats!  Always nice to see a new member come in with a smoker.  When it comes to gear, it really is going to depend on the type of riding you plan on doing.  Most have already made it clear, it's always helmet, boots, and gloves.  Those are the three items that are basic.  I don't opt myself for all the other fancy gear like chest protectors, knee protectors, hell everything protectors, but that's just me and I'm not discounting it.  Like I said, it depends on the type of riding you plan on doing.  Literally, I could pretty much ride butt naked, so long as I have helmet, boots, and gloves, I'm good to go. Take it slow, be one with your bike.  Know what it can and cannot do, and you'll be just fine.  Welcome and again, congrats, the bike look really nice and well maintained. :devil:

Wax on Wax off  :p

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My local mechanic is dealer for some of these equipment and he wants to order the equipment and I pay for it. I am not sure why he was do it, but the prices seems cheaper.

 

Helment:

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/36189/i/fly-racing-trekker-ds-helmet

 

What you think of this helment I want to order? I wear glasses so this should be good.

 

Your mechanic is probably still making a few bucks on the deal, can't fault that as long as his prices are reasonable.

 

So about a helmet, your best move is to try them on at a bike dealership or other place with large selection. They have different shapes internally to fit different shapes of head. I go to my local bike dealership and try on all of them in my price range. Some feel great, some terrible. My dealer's price is actually as good as I have found online.  

I usually do as you are and stay in the economy price range for helmets. I break them, they get gross, etc. Nice to throw it out every year or so without guilt. I wear a good street helmet but a cheap dirt helmet.

 

Boots, go with the Gaerne GX-1. About $200 online and by far the best boot for the money. Actually, they are the only really good quality boot for $200.

 

If you want to spend more, Gaerne has some full-featured boots with hinged ankles. Forma makes a nice boot for the money I have heard. Sidi is a top quality boot I have owned. Fantastic but they run a little too narrow for my foot. Same with Alpinestars.

 

The chest protector is another good thing to try on before you buy. I have four of them and only like one. It's an old 661 hard shell they don't make anymore. Go for lightweight and comfortable. The best ones will make you forget it's on.

 

Don't forget the Camelbak. Smaller is better than a huge backpack one, at least to start.

Edited by sandlvr69
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i have that fly helmet. i only use it for dual sport riding. i think its too big and heavy for pure dirt riding. 

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Your mechanic is probably still making a few bucks on the deal, can't fault that as long as his prices are reasonable.

 

So about a helmet, your best move is to try them on at a bike dealership or other place with large selection. They have different shapes internally to fit different shapes of head. I go to my local bike dealership and try on all of them in my price range. Some feel great, some terrible. My dealer's price is actually as good as I have found online.  

I usually do as you are and stay in the economy price range for helmets. I break them, they get gross, etc. Nice to throw it out every year or so without guilt. I wear a good street helmet but a cheap dirt helmet.

 

Boots, go with the Gaerne GX-1. About $200 online and by far the best boot for the money. Actually, they are the only really good quality boot for $200.

 

If you want to spend more, Gaerne has some full-featured boots with hinged ankles. Forma makes a nice boot for the money I have heard. Sidi is a top quality boot I have owned. Fantastic but they run a little too narrow for my foot. Same with Alpinestars.

 

The chest protector is another good thing to try on before you buy. I have four of them and only like one. It's an old 661 hard shell they don't make anymore. Go for lightweight and comfortable. The best ones will make you forget it's on.

 

Don't forget the Camelbak. Smaller is better than a huge backpack one, at least to start.

 

Note that RockyMountainATV and others will let you exchange boots, chest protectors, and other clothing/gear for free, including FREE shipping, as long as it is in new condition. You will pay a little more for their products than at the absolute discount joints, but being able to try before your final buy is great if you don't live near some sort of superstore.

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Thanks everyone for replying,

 

My local mechanic is dealer for some of these equipment and he wants to order the equipment and I pay for it. I am not sure why he was do it, but the prices seems cheaper.

 

Helment:

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/36189/i/fly-racing-trekker-ds-helmet

 

What you think of this helment I want to order? I wear glasses so this should be good.

 

Can you recommend good light boots and a chest protector.

 

Thank you all. 

Get yourself some goggles that will fit over your glasses, because glasses are expensive. The first rock or whatever that gets kicked out of the tire from the guy in front of you while his tire is spinning at 60 mph and you are doing 60 mph. Well you get the picture goobered up glasses.

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I wear glasses so this should be good.

 

No, this is not good at all. You need actual protection against roosted rocks, tree branches, the ground when you fall. You need something to keep dust out of your eyes. Usable goggles can be had for $20. This is no place to skimp, at all.

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Note that RockyMountainATV and others will let you exchange boots, chest protectors, and other clothing/gear for free, including FREE shipping, as long as it is in new condition. You will pay a little more for their products than at the absolute discount joints, but being able to try before your final buy is great if you don't live near some sort of superstore.

Dennis Kirk actually includes a return shipping label with every order to make exchanges easy.

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This is what i do, Tinted goggles over my glasses the dust gets horrible without and a face shield won't cut it. 

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