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Why 1 Down and 4 Up?

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Why is the transmission 1 down/4up?

 

As they all seem to be that I'll have to assume it's a mechanical reason - but I'd sure like to know it.

 

Why not 5 up...I think that would be better.

 

I run a 51 in the back just to avoid that 1st to 2nd shift stuff...although in reality 1st is too low/perky regardless.

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The last thing I'd want to have happen when dropping gears up a steep climb is to click into neutral because I forgot to count which gear I was in. Also, you shouldn't be shifting into neutral all that often. It's really for starting up the bike and being able to walk away from it without it dying. So in that regard, neutral is "hidden" between first and second to stay out of the way when riding. If it were at the bottom, I'd be hitting it all the time on accident.

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As mentioned its so you don't hit neutral down shifting.

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Why is the transmission 1 down/4up?

 

As they all seem to be that I'll have to assume it's a mechanical reason - but I'd sure like to know it.

 

Why not 5 up...I think that would be better.

 

I run a 51 in the back just to avoid that 1st to 2nd shift stuff...although in reality 1st is too low/perky regardless.

 

 

It's a sequential transmission. If neutral was at the bottom (it has been done) then it would be too easy to accidentally shift into neutral instead of first.

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The last thing I'd want to have happen when dropping gears up a steep climb is to click into neutral because I forgot to count which gear I was in. Also, you shouldn't be shifting into neutral all that often. It's really for starting up the bike and being able to walk away from it without it dying. So in that regard, neutral is "hidden" between first and second to stay out of the way when riding. If it were at the bottom, I'd be hitting it all the time on accident.

Exactly. Side note, I once had a 50's Japanese semi-copy of a Guzzi. N-1-2-3-4-5-N again, repeat. Sucked.

Mike

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Exactly. Side note, I once had a 50's Japanese semi-copy of a Guzzi. N-1-2-3-4-5-N again, repeat. Sucked.

Mike

ah yes. you had a drum with no stops or something like that. a co-worker of mine that's done a bunch of riding over seas and bought foreign brand bikes over there said they're all like that.  you can shift from 5th to neutral to 1st and back through the gears by just keep lifting up on the shifter.  how weird would that be to be ripping along, accelerating, grabbing gears and you think you have one left only to roll back to neutral. crazy to me.

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ah yes. you had a drum with no stops or something like that. a co-worker of mine that's done a bunch of riding over seas and bought foreign brand bikes over there said they're all like that.  you can shift from 5th to neutral to 1st and back through the gears by just keep lifting up on the shifter.  how weird would that be to be ripping along, accelerating, grabbing gears and you think you have one left only to roll back to neutral. crazy to me.

Had to count. Believe it or not this thing was called a "Lilac". Found it in a barn and bought it for nothing. New battery and started right up. Later sold to a collector.

Mike

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By the way, many road race bikes are the opposite, one up, however many down. You can do this too, if you have a linkage.

 

Mike

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By the way, many road race bikes are the opposite, one up, however many down. You can do this too, if you have a linkage.

 

Mike

 

yeah, the same guy has a gsxr 750 set up for the track with that configuration.  i understand why and it would be fine if it were the only bike you rode. but to go from a regular pattern to that, back and forth would be difficult. i wouldn't be into it anyway.  a former business partner of mine had a late 70's, i think, sportster that had the shifter on the right. that was brutal to get used to. i always got surprised riding that thing.

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yeah, the same guy has a gsxr 750 set up for the track with that configuration.  i understand why and it would be fine if it were the only bike you rode. but to go from a regular pattern to that, back and forth would be difficult. i wouldn't be into it anyway.  a former business partner of mine had a late 70's, i think, sportster that had the shifter on the right. that was brutal to get used to. i always got surprised riding that thing.

Ya, imagine bouncing off the limiter and trying to shift down instead of up?

I barely remember the Bultaco's of the late 60's- early 70's. Everything was opposite of the Jap bikes.

Mike

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When I was a kid , a buddy had a Bridgestone 90 2T

It had a Rotary gearbox , so 1 2 3 4 N 1 2 3 4 .

If you thought you were in 3rd and changed into 4th , when it was in 4th already .. It would hit neutral and Scream it's Guts out !!

 

Yes, that's what I was talking about, except the Lilac was a 4 stroke, and a lame one at that. It never screamed.

 

Mike

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Exactly. Side note, I once had a 50's Japanese semi-copy of a Guzzi. N-1-2-3-4-5-N again, repeat. Sucked.

Mike

Bridgestone did that in the early to mid sixties!  Oh for those of you less informed , there was a Bridgstone MC company!

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some of my early bikes were English, then had Jap at same time. English shifted on right, of coarse Jap on the left!  that sure was confusing racing one/other. Can you imagine how many times I attempted to shift the foot brake!   LOL

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Did you get a new bike?

Newer, yup. Jury is still out.

Its hard to get used to the vibes of the thumper. Lol

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Exactly. Side note, I once had a 50's Japanese semi-copy of a Guzzi. N-1-2-3-4-5-N again, repeat. Sucked.

Mike

I rode my friends bike once that was kind of like that but it went. N-1-2-3-1-N it seemed every time I thought i was in 2nd I was really in 3rd so I shifted one more time, next thing I know the back wheel was screeching like crazy...

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