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Getting a little more HEIGHT out of the rear of my S

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Hoping Craigo or Ron can chime in on this.. I was hope to maybe get one more inch in height on the rear of my DRZ400s (and at the same time just stiffen it up a hair).. seems a bit lower then my brothers in the back.. the rear suspension locking and turning cap seem to be about half way down the threads that compress the spring.. So there seems to be room to adjust the spring / suspension.. Any tips on this would be appreciated.  Does compressing the spring down more have any effect on height and stiffness?.. If so, is it easy to do?  Any pointers would be awesome!

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I adjust my rear spring so it was compressed more. Seemed to stiffen up the rear a bit, did nothing for height though.

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On the sport bikes we put a shim on the clevis to get ride height.

 

I would image you can find washers to fit the DRZ shock to use as a shim.

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Of course increasing your spring pre load will stiffen the rear.....but don't do this at the expense of losing your static and race sag...

depending on your weight it will help, though if the your just too heavy, a stiffer spring could be required....

Last year I wound my rear spring up several turns and it made the world of difference (for the good)

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I thought that increasing preload would make the spring stiffer, but according to what I've read it actually doesn't. (Springs are funny. Another counterintuitive thing: If you cut one shorter, it becomes *stiffer* - the exact inverse of what I thought at first.)

 

At least the spring itself won't become stiffer if it's screwed tighter together. I'm not sure what happens in the shock when it "sits" in a diferent part of the stroke with preload.

 

But the major side effect when you lower/raise the rear is that the handling character changes. Lower rear or higher front = slower steering (and it can get real heavy if it's taken too far). Higher rear or lower front = quicker steering (and it will become floppy and scary if taken too far). The secondary effect is that the front / rear weight balance changes which can shift traction from front to rear and vice versa. More weighted front = more bite in turns, more weighted rear = more traction under acceleration.

 

1) Set your rear sag! Seems that the recommendation is roughly 90-100mm "race sag" (= how much the bike sags with you on it, in gear, in the normal riding position or "attack position" if your intention is to be serious about offroad). I have my S at 105mm rear sag and I like it best that way. (Also measure your static sag. Once you reach the right race sag, the static sag you end up with will tell you if the spring rate is correct or not.)

 

If you're raising the rear a lot, be careful in your first ride. This can make a surprisingly big difference, even only a few mm.

 

(And note that you can change the handling character a little bit following the rear sag change by sliding the forks up/down in the yoke, if you wish.)

 

2) How much do you weigh? Are the stock springs installed?

Edited by Anthon Berg

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On the sport bikes we put a shim on the clevis to get ride height.

 

I would image you can find washers to fit the DRZ shock to use as a shim.

 

Won't work with our rear shock or most other MX/trail bikes.  Either you run more preload/stiffer spring/or shorter linkage link...

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