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Calling on WR250R owners for advisement

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I've been considering this bike very heavily. I recently decided that when my finances start to look better, this will be my next purchase, on top of the DRZ-400 i currently have. I have even started assembling a list of mods I want to put on the bike.

 

Then it hit me...when I first bought my used DRZ-400, I got slammed with maintenance issue after maintenance issue...a few examples:

 

1) Dead Stator (common)

2) Crankshaft seized (lets not talk about this one, but the engine has been rebuilt, all new ans shiny inside)

3) Battery problems. (finally made a bigger battery box and put in a YTZ10S battery on it)

4. Carburetor woes, gearing woes, exhaust woes, suspension woes (current projects)

 

The WR250R is a different animal, being equipped with EFI, six gears, and decent power. but then, that solves the problems i currently have with my DRZ, but what about inherent problems with the WR250R?

 

my question is, what are some common snags of this bike? it can't be perfect, so hit me with your knowledge. I want to know what to plan to fix, BEFORE i blow my budget on shiny modification and add-ons.

 

And to be direct about one specification of the bike, the battery has 120 CCAs in its battery. does this battery feel sufficient in the bike? thanks. I've done a lot of research on this bike, and unlike the DRZ, it seems kind of harder to find people talking about its warts rather than its smile.

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Ok.. I just got a 2013 a couple of months ago and this is what I have found. Depending on what you plan on using it for makes a difference. If you are going to use mainly for the street with a little trail riding, than its almost perfect.  The gearing is right on for the street. There is a little dead spot in the fuel mapping right off ideal but it is so minor that you dont notice it on the street. 

However, I am mainly using mine for trail riding so I did a lot of mods. I went down one tooth on the front spocket and that was perfect. I also bought the power bomb header and Q4 exhaust with the EJK fuel module and a free flow air filter. That fixed the dead spot off ideal however if you want take full advantage of that stuff than you have to modify the air box. The air box is just not designed for high volume. The quickest fix is to disconnect the flapper valve. This helps but a lot of guys are even going futher.

Hope this helps.. Check out SR Moto.com  it is a great web site for the wr250r.

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going to be +5 c (41 f) when I go to ride my 08 wr250x home tonight. have started it at much colder with no problems.  still has original battery and never has given me any problems starting other than when I did the fuel pump last year when the fuel pump overheated and quit on me.  once it cooled off it started fine.  hiccup off idle was fixed on mine by putting the gyrt silencer on it and a kn air filter.  did a Barnett clutch 2 years ago as mine was making noise on take off in low gear (250lb rider).  as mine is a sumo the chain and sprockets will probably last longer than a dirt ridden one but I got 12000km (7500mi) out of a set and I was doing the swing arm bearings at the time as they had play.  did wheel bearings last summer as it quit gliding up to traffic lights/stops.

 

currently have 8500 miles on mine.  other than what was listed above,  I have only changed oil and added gas besides some carbon fibre for looks. 

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I've only owned mine since october, it now has 2000 miles. Zero trouble starting even below freezing temps.

I'll go one tooth bigger in the rear when these wear out. Feels kinda gappy from 1st to 2nd now.

 

I don't enjoy jumping this bike but otherwise like the suspension. The biggest wart is lack of wheelie power...it needs help from the clutch.

 

Honestly I never had any troubles with my 2001 DRZ400S either.

These 2 bikes are extremely similar. DRZ better power, WRR better transmission and noticeably lighter but not worth owning both IMO.

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I've only owned mine since october, it now has 2000 miles. Zero trouble starting even below freezing temps.

I'll go one tooth bigger in the rear when these wear out. Feels kinda gappy from 1st to 2nd now.

I don't enjoy jumping this bike but otherwise like the suspension. The biggest wart is lack of wheelie power...it needs help from the clutch.

Honestly I never had any troubles with my 2001 DRZ400S either.

These 2 bikes are extremely similar. DRZ better power, WRR better transmission and noticeably lighter but not worth owning both IMO.

My DRZ is not very friendly to drastic altitude changes, thats why the efi and lightweight of this bike excites me. Also, the wr250r would probably accompany the drz400 with my girl riding it most of the time, not me.

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That makes perfect sense. Sounds good.

BTW I have a 32inch inseam and have lowered the suspension as low as possible without a link. You might add a lowering link to your mods list if your girl has any shorter legs than me.

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That makes perfect sense. Sounds good.

BTW I have a 32inch inseam and have lowered the suspension as low as possible without a link. You might add a lowering link to your mods list if your girl has any shorter legs than me.

 

this is the build plan, just wanted to find out any snafoos that would need fixing before upgrading.

 

YAMAHA WR250R - $6,700 (or used)

Aftermarket total: $2,535 + shipping

·         radiator guards - http://www.forceaccessories.com.au/Page/Products.php

·         yamaha lowering link - http://www.motorcycleloweringlinks.com/index.php?content=yamaha-lowering-link-wr250xr

·         IMS 4.7 Gal fuel tank - http://www.imsproducts.com/Products/index.cfm?ManufacturerSet=Yamaha&maD=true&ModelSet=WR250R&modD=true&yeD=true&siD=true&TypeSet=Fuel%20Tank&SeriesSet=&sed=true&tyd=true&YearsSet=08-14&SizeSet=4.7%20gal

·         2.5 gal tour tank - http://www.coyote-gear.com/R2gallons.html

·         Dirtbagz ranger saddle bags and brackets - http://www.dbzproducts.com/models.htm

·         Lynx HID light front fairing with windscreen - http://www.britanniacomposites.com/index.php/productmenu/lynxmenu#!/~/

·         lower, wider seat concepts seat - http://www.seatconcepts.com/products#!/~/product/category=1671359&id=23562930

Performance: Big Bore Kit - Athena or Thumper Racing (leaning towards thumper racing) $500 - $1,000

 

grand total light weight touring champion:  $9,735 - $10,235 + parts shipping.

$11,000~

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One more thing I was just reminded of today. :jawdrop:

If you plan on running certain knobbies (I'm running a scorpion pro front) my front end wobbles above 70mph. It did NOT do this with the stock tires.

I've read others have this problem as well.

 

It doesn't sound like the way you would want to go anyway Ivan as the stock tires are excellent in most conditions.

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Thats bwcause most knobbies arent speed rated, i would imagine, for that. I REALLY like my Shinko rear on my drz 400.. prolly put that on there. Still on a TKC Frony for the drz, not a big fan of them cause i ride on some muddy areas. Cant wait till its wore out and i can try the shinko front.

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Let's see:   I've had zero problems--bought new in November 2012 and it has a bit under 2500 miles on it, now.  If I had to make a list of some sort, this is what I'd put on it..

 

1) Keep an eye on the underside of the swingarm.   They have been known to suffer damage from poorly adjusted chains. 

2) The suspension is made for little guys.

3) the bike weighs around 290 lbs

4) stock gearing is a bit too high for technical riding, but it will push you 80 mph no problem.   With stock gearing, it's really jerky at low speed--you either coast with no throttle at 5 mph or you barely crack teh throttle and go 10mph.   Usually you bounce between the two with no sense of control.   A dirt tamer throttle tube and a 49 tooth rear helped get rid of that twitchyness.

5)  I've heard that it doesn't have the low end grunt that the drz 400 does.

6)  They do make DOT knobbies (Dunlop 606 are great), and you get kind of used to the wobbly feeling at speed.  Just stay away from tar snakes and painted roads during  a rain.

7)  You will get used to the height, no matter how high it is.

8)  It's a powerful 250, but it's still a 250.

9)  Get some decent handlebars (first crash will bend the stock bars--I did),

10) get a skidplate and a radiator guard.  +/- 100 to $200 expenditure.

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Let's see: I've had zero problems--bought new in November 2012 and it has a bit under 2500 miles on it, now. If I had to make a list of some sort, this is what I'd put on it..

1) Keep an eye on the underside of the swingarm. They have been known to suffer damage from poorly adjusted chains.

2) The suspension is made for little guys.

3) the bike weighs around 290 lbs

4) stock gearing is a bit too high for technical riding, but it will push you 80 mph no problem. With stock gearing, it's really jerky at low speed--you either coast with no throttle at 5 mph or you barely crack teh throttle and go 10mph. Usually you bounce between the two with no sense of control. A dirt tamer throttle tube and a 49 tooth rear helped get rid of that twitchyness.

5) I've heard that it doesn't have the low end grunt that the drz 400 does.

6) They do make DOT knobbies (Dunlop 606 are great), and you get kind of used to the wobbly feeling at speed. Just stay away from tar snakes and painted roads during a rain.

7) You will get used to the height, no matter how high it is.

8) It's a powerful 250, but it's still a 250.

9) Get some decent handlebars (first crash will bend the stock bars--I did),

10) get a skidplate and a radiator guard. +/- 100 to $200 expenditure.

Thank you. This is good info.

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