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Battery life

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This came up with a recent incident with my street bike, 11 years and 64000 miles and the factory battery failed. Got me thinking, first battery failure I've had with a vehicle that I've owned since new. Talking up to 8 years and 160,000 miles and no failure/replacement until now. Used vehicles, cars, trucks, bikes, RV's, usually replace the first year. Then never again.

My '03 Dakota, 11 years and 100,000 miles, original battery, am I on borrowed time?

Mike

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I have always considered any automotive battery on borrowed time after 5 years

 

 

Yea, keep hearing that. I guess the question is rhetorical.

 

Mike

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I seem to get 7-8 years.  Heat is what kills them more than anything. Cold just shows you if they are weak, doesn't shorten their life span like heat does. 

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I've owned 5 different vehicles, and every one of them except one needed the battery replaced within a year of me purchasing the vehicle.  The batteries were all around 6-7 years old.  Most of the vehicles I sold after 2-3 years so I don't know how long the new batteries lasted.

 

My Frontier has been around the longest at 8 years, there's 4 years and about 90,000 miles on the current battery.  I've got 2 amps in that truck, and it spends a lot of time at bonfires playing music, so I don't expect it'll last very long.

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I've owned 5 different vehicles, and every one of them except one needed the battery replaced within a year of me purchasing the vehicle. The batteries were all around 6-7 years old. Most of the vehicles I sold after 2-3 years so I don't know how long the new batteries lasted.

My Frontier has been around the longest at 8 years, there's 4 years and about 90,000 miles on the current battery. I've got 2 amps in that truck, and it spends a lot of time at bonfires playing music, so I don't expect it'll last very long.

Ever thought about a second battery for the amps?

If you install a battery isolator, you can drain the rear batt. and still start your truck with the front battery.

Having an extra battery will also help take care of voltage drop

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I've thought about it, but probably won't bother with it unless I put in a larger amp for my sub.

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I seem to get 7-8 years.  Heat is what kills them more than anything. Cold just shows you if they are weak, doesn't shorten their life span like heat does. 

 

Batteries are fickle.  I had a '95 Yukon that would eat a battery just about every 2 years on the dot.  It was bone stock.  Great truck for the 8 years and 4 batteries we had it.  Wife '93 accord had 3 batteries in the 13 years we owned it.  The last one was a $5 refurb that I put in 7years before we sold the car.  The other vehicles we've owned have stayed in the 3 to 5 year range.  Except with our e450 Motorhome.  We replaced coach batteries every 2 years and always during the summer. However, the chassis battery was 3 years old when we bought it and was still going strong when we sold it 5 years later.

Edited by quailchaser

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Batteries are fickle.

 

No, you live in an oven! 

 

JK, mostly. Lived out there a few years, had my Jeep battery fail in Phoenix. It was 7 years old. Went to fire it up after work and all I got was a shot-gun-like-blast under the hood, then zero power. Opened the hood and everything looked ok, then I noticed the ground terminal was sort of crooked. Lifted it right out of the battery. Sealed, maintenance free battery, decided to vent itself I guess. 2001 TJ, original battery, happened in 2008. 

 

My other current battery experiences:

 

Original battery in the wife's 2007 VW, getting tired. If it's below 45 deg or so it's noticeably slower cranking. Doesn't help we store it winters and I haven't used a battery tender, just start the car and run 20-30 min it every 2-3 weeks. 

 

5 year old battery in my truck (92 C2500), still was cranking it up at -20 deg this winter despite not changing out the 10W-30 conventional. Surprised this one is still going, as 2 years back I left my interior light on at the airport, and was gone for 2 weeks. By the way, EVERYONE is too busy to stop and help give a jump when leaving an airport. I was parked right near the exit, and standing with jumper cables and the hood up and waving anyone down that could help. Seriously 100 people drove past me, and I would bet 60-70% would turn and look the other way as they went by, pretending they didn't see me.

 

8 year old battery (Jan 2006) in the Buick (97 LeSabre). This one has surprised me, as I left my aftermarket fog lights on one day/night as they were completely packed with snow and I didn't realize they were on. Stone dead battery 13 hours later. Charged it up, not a hint that it was drained, fires the car off at -15 to -20 deg, no problem. 

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