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Returning the bike to vertical

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I thought maybe I should post this in riding techniques but the problem is I think, slightly model specific so can we keep this post here in this section?

 

I made a recent post about falling down in soft sand a lot as a beginner. The replies were super constructive, instructional, and certainly made me a better rider. I don't fall down a lot for the original reasons but, I still fall down sometimes as I'm sure others do also. The bike is called a BRP for a good reason. Mine is a 2007 but probably is exactly the same as many model years. Something I've noticed is that there really aren't many good "hand holds" or proper handles to grab on to when you need to upright the BRP. With two people, there is no problem. But after riding for a few hours, muscling it out of a few muddy creek beds, and being 54 years-old, the BRP doesn't really cooperate very well when its laying on its side.

 

Has anyone developed a good strategy to upright their BRP? Has anyone incorporated something like a loop or strap? Any "slap my forehead" ideas that might help avoid sissifying yourself and asking for help?

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On the 600r and L the frame rail is pretty well exposed by the rear fender and provides a lot of leverage. If you are on a 650R, they are definitely harder to get a good grip on. I'd say the fender straps are a decent idea if you are looking for more leverage. All the erzburg bikes seem to run them (doubt any are 650's but still).....

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I have an extra grab bar that goes under the tool bag and also mounts to the turn sig mounts. Takes slightly longer bolts usually.

 

It's white though.

 

I have one on mine, makes pickups and dragging to where you can pick it up much easier.

 

Yours for shipping.

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Best for me is turn the wheel use the rear luggage rack I installed and handlebar cross strap, facing away from your bike use your legs like a squat to lift it. It also works for the electra glide that fell in my driveway, weighs more than 2 BRP bolted together. 

 

Here is one of a little gal lifting up a sportster

 

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If what XR650L_Dave is offering is one of these:

IMG_0482.jpg

you might want to take him up on this offer, It works really well for me along with using the basic idea of the video above,

I got caught going down at a very high elevation after I was exhausted and freezing and almost couldn't get the bike back up, when I got home I started thinking about something to help in a emergency and started researching and came across the same video previously posted.

I got one of those grab bars and used the video technique the next time my bike went down and it was a breeze up-righting the BRP with one hand on that grab bar and the other on the hand grip.

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Just as the video that Calgard has posted - but without a lot of the messing around - fall off, get back on as soon as possible and ride.....

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While that video is informational, it is also something of a parlor trick.

 

The bike is laying on the right side so that the kickstand will prevent it from going over. There is no fuel in the tank and I would not be surprised there was no oil in the tank either (which is several quarts). The large crash bar means that it is not laying all the way over when the wheels are touching the ground, when she starts to pick it up it is obvious is comes up quite a bit before the rear wheel even touches and it starts to get harder to lift.

 

Informational, but everything is set up to make it as easy as possible for demonstration purposes.

 

When you have a 350lb dual purpose bike laying somewhat upside down on a hill, leaking fuel, you may still be a little dizzy from smacking a tree with your noggin, and there is nothing but mud or slick ground, it doesn't work like that. You need every handhold you can get and it's going to take some muscle to wrestle the bike into a position before it can even be lifted. It's not like dropping a Harley in the parking lot.

Edited by Onederer
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Totally agree that the video is a set up - but matters not what side it falls on the lift method works. May be a bit of a bitch getting it into the right position if it falls downhill (i.e. bars and saddle pointing downhill) but it can be moved round  into a suitable position - just as it would if you used the "conventional lifting method.... 

You do it your way - I use the easy method....lol

Edited by reduceus

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I have no problem picking my bike up just using the handlebars and I'm not super strong or anything.  I've managed to find the need to pick it up about once a year since I bought it.

 

But... I added a rear rack to mine about six months ago because I know that can make a big difference in picking up the bike or moving it around when stuck during off-road riding.  It doesn't do much for the looks of the bike, but I don't care.  I only care how a bike works, not how it looks.  And it gives me somewhere to strap my "adventure bag" with the tire irons, spare tubes, first aid kit, and other stuff that might be needed when out in the middle of nowhere.

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Hey folks Thanks for not calling me a panty-waisted-ninny. I have what I believe is the MC Engineering luggage rack. I thought that this was a factory rack because my son has the same one on his XR. I feel that the rack is too whimpy to hold the weight so I don't use it for a handhold. There just isn't a handhold anywhere near under the seat. I found a post here about ManRacks and theirs looks much more appropriate for taking the stress because it looks like it bolts to additional hard points. I've sent them an email. The Tugger looks like a good idea too and I have a sewing machine and a few cargo straps ;). Like mentioned the video isn't really applicable to most of the situations I find myself in. My bike falls all the way over and never partially. Sometimes I'm under it. I like the Tugger idea because it will probably assist someone who is trying to pull the bike off of me. Last Sunday I actually had a situation that was very close to me not being able to get out from under the bike. My son helped out and I'm not totally sure that I could have done it myself due to the compromised position that I was in. I'll post what I come up with.

Thanks again

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Reading the post by wrnchbndr (hope I spelled it correctly...lol)  made me wonder..... how many actually go off roading on their own? 

I appreciate he had his son with him but I know of guys who go off into the middle of nowhere with little or no backup plan

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Reading the post by wrnchbndr (hope I spelled it correctly...lol)  made me wonder..... how many actually go off roading on their own? 

I appreciate he had his son with him but I know of guys who go off into the middle of nowhere with little or no backup plan

I do sometimes.  Last Saturday it was with three other guys, but if I can't get someone to ride with I'll go anyway.  Usually I'm somewhere that other people ride, though.

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Reading the post by wrnchbndr (hope I spelled it correctly...lol)  made me wonder..... how many actually go off roading on their own? 

I appreciate he had his son with him but I know of guys who go off into the middle of nowhere with little or no backup plan

If I do any dirt riding these days I'd go on my own..All the old cobbers are out of bikes now..they've moved on to I don't know what really,,mowing lawns

is probably their thrill..I have no problem with riding in the forest or on the beach alone but you're never a million miles from anywhere in NZ..Head east or

west and you hit the sea in about 1,2,3 or so hours..Not much chance of getting lost..It's no desert out there..You snap a leg or something that's more serious.

If you want to live you'll find a way out,,The prospect of death makes one try slightly harder..A semi paranoid/sensible person would carry a personal locator beacon in

case they got badly stuffed up..Nought wrong with them,,they save hunters and climbers quite a bit down here..

Edited by Horri

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These devices they are calling cell phones are pretty cool. I went a few years living in the past and then when I got one I never remembered to take it out of the house. Getting back into riding a few years back changed all that. Especially when the first bike I got was a long neglected Sportster. Not many places in New Jersey that you don't get a signal but for the hardcore outback riders Im sure there are places where a cell phone would be useless. Yea... I like solitude and just putting around the woods on a fairly quiet thumper at little more than an idle.

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Not many places in New Jersey that you don't get a signal but for the hardcore outback riders Im sure there are places where a cell phone would be useless.

Just about everywhere interesting in the Sierras gets no cell signal - at least for AT&T.  But the region of interest there for dirt roads and trails is about the size of your entire state. :thinking:

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At least on the 600, there are little stubs of subframe in that little gap right where the rear fender hits the side panels.  I generally position one hand there and the other hand on the handlebar grip, both on the downhill side of the bike.  Just don't lift with such vigor that the bike pivots upright and then keeps on going to fall again on the other side with you are still holding on so tightly that you get pulled over on top of the bike. 

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Onederer I have to disagree a 350 lb Motorcycle is nothing like lifting an 870 lb motorcycle I've done both a few times, I'll chose even the big red pig of mine in the mud, on a hill upside down anyday, the last lift of the Electra-glide resulted in a hernia. 

Even that sissy sportster weighs in at 560 lbs .. The point here is the technique I have that 870 lb and a video camera if someone has a superior method I will Bow to them.  

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Heart of darkness - do you eat lots of spinach? To perform your manoeuvre  you must be either very young or very strong - when you hit 67 try to do it the same way and think you will resort to our weakling method. Wrnchbndr, problem here with mobiles is that as soon as you go away from the main areas you have an issue - and even with one trying to explain to people where you are is difficult as no actual map exists of the country that shows many of the villages.... 

Edited by reduceus
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