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1990 XR200R Project II;

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This is my project after Phase I;

 

1) Replaced rusty handlebars

2) Put 87 forks, 87 lower triples, 90 uppers and 90 wheel w/ odo delete

3) R & R shift star, shift plate

4) Glass Bead and repaint gear shift lever, kickstarter, footpegs & engine guard

    and kick stand.  

 

I was not going to register it until I got the shifting resolved, now on the California

DMV, which could be costly, dunno, we'll see. Anyone from California understands

the fun I am about to encounter, then Phase II begins, as it still needs alot of work. 

 

BTW, before anyone says get rid of the blue fork boots, red fork boots are on the

list for phase II, I know, they are hideous. 

 

 

IMG_18031.jpgIMG_41041.jpgIMG_63811.jpgIMG_96281.jpg

 

Michael 

Edited by KTM520EXC
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That's a good looking bike! Yeah....good luck with DMV.... Are you looking to make it street legal or do you have other registration issues?

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WWalker,

 

The previous Owner (Nevada Resident) purchased it from someone in California back in 95 ish, so it had a 1994 Green Registration Sticker on it

 

Looks like I dodged a financial bullet, but a fair amount of paperwork for the CA DMV, plus I have to bring bike to have the VIN verified.

 

No intention of making street legal, just green sticker legal. 

 

Michael 

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That shouldn't be much of a problem if you have all the paperwork needed on your end. Good luck. I honestly have had good experiences at our local DMV offices....but I always make an appointment. 

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Currently I have a set of XR400 forks on my 87, so I had a spare front end and parts. 

 

The 1987's were in better condition, than the 1990 set that came with the bike (blown fork seals).

 

Primarily I was trying to mate up the 87 aluminum lower triples with the aluminum stem for slight weight savings vs. the 1990 steel setup. 

 

The 86-88 models have the aluminum setup, the 90+ have the steel setup, I am guessing I saved ~ 1lb by going this route. 

 

This project is my lightweight bike and I am shooting for 208lbs, without going overboard.

 

This is budget build and I am trying to keep costs at a ceiling of $1200. Right now I am at $425, which includes purchase of bike, gas to get bike and shift star r & r and gaskets.  

 

I already have a 89 XR250R aluminum swingarm and an 86 XR200R linkage and plan on putting an aluminum rear sprocket and also trying to get an aluminum rear wheel hub collar machined up. That should shave off ~ 7 to 9 lbs so that should get me close to my goal. The bike already came with a aluminum super trap, so probably helped out a bit in the weight department.

 

Michael  

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Installed 86XR250R swing arm and the 86XR200R linkage today, but took the shock out and it is need of a rebuild, 0 nitrogen and seals are blown, but the shaft looks to be in good condition. I'll have a crack at myself and see if I have any luck. So far can't get the adjustment rings to move, so dowsed with liquid wrench with the hopes it loosens up. I am speculating it took off 5 to 6 lbs today.

Just a side note for those that have the 86's to 88's. The linkage does not come with roller bearings, so they are more prone to wear, keep those zerks filled with fresh grease as best you can. All 3 of the bushing I removed were worn out. Although the 90 linkage is substantially heavier, it at least had roller bearings, but no zerks to fill with grease. The 86XR250R linkage had roller bearings and zerks, Honda could have easily done this for 200 as well, but did not.

Michael

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OK, so finally got the rear shock disassembled, it was a black mess of what smelled like tired hydraulic fluid and the bushing head I am going to replace was totally worn out.

Wow a better guide from the Honda Service Manual would have been nice. The instructions are lacking in some the areas you could use more detail.

I plan on rebuilding the 87's shock as well, now I have the learning curve somewhat down and will post detailed instructions and photos for those Guys that want to tackle it themselves. All I can say is that I have a new found respect for the suspension Guys that do this everyday for a living. I always sent mine to a suspension tuner until recently, wanting to have a go myself.

There is a technique for removing those darned snap rings, that was the most time consuming part of the job for me.

This begs the question of how many 86-91's have zero nitrogen in their respective reservoirs and where does the nitrogen leak out of ???

I removed the top of my reservoir and inspected the bladder and it looked fine, not bad for 24 years old, however there was more debris in the reservoir below the bladder than anywhere. I went nuts with the brake cleaner to get it all out.

Any rate, now to order up replacement parts.

BTW, Happy Memorial Day for those Vets that served their country !!!

Michael

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Slight change in plans, I have decided to put the 86XR250R aluminum swing arm on the 87 vs. the 90 due to it's further along in being completed. 

 

I "have to" send shock to suspension tuner, due to lack of available stock parts. 

 

Sending to Hlebo Bros.

 

Just a side note for weight savings, the 86 XR250R brake drum is made of magnesium and has an aluminum brake arm, a weight savings of ~ .5 lbs. 

 

My electronic family weight scale measures in .5 lb increments so I don't know the exact difference in weight

 

I only know one is 1.5 lbs and the other 2.0 lbs

 

Michael 

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