Kouba Link Front Fork Measurement After Install

Can someone provide a measurement of how much fork you have exposed after slipping them through the triple clamp in order to lower the motorcycle? Kouba link doesn't offer any definite measurement and I have risers with protaper bars, so no way to gauge what the limit for stock bars is.

take a look at your fork tubes .... you can see where you would not want to go further ...... they change shape. 

take a look at your fork tubes .... you can see where you would not want to go further ...... they change shape. 

I'd feel better if someone gave me a strict number to go by but I'll certainly use that guidance. Thanks!

I'd feel better if someone gave me a strict number to go by but I'll certainly use that guidance. Thanks!

 

I honestly do not think there is a "real" number ... it is what ever you feel comfortable with. I think for me I would want to make real sure that there is not way the tire could touch the fender if I bottomed the suspension. 

 

I could be wrong ... 

I honestly do not think there is a "real" number ... it is what ever you feel comfortable with. I think for me I would want to make real sure that there is not way the tire could touch the fender if I bottomed the suspension. 

 

I could be wrong ... 

Yep, that's what I want to avoid. Tire + fender action. Amanda will be riding it from here on out and she's new to all this. If tire meets fender she'll most certainly panic and get hurt.

I think a 1/2 inch should be okay ...

I think a 1/2 inch should be okay ...

Gracias! 

Can someone provide a measurement of how much fork you have exposed after slipping them through the triple clamp in order to lower the motorcycle? Kouba link doesn't offer any definite measurement and I have risers with protaper bars, so no way to gauge what the limit for stock bars is.

Kray, if it helps any... the dealer lowered mine a full inch. I rode it that way for about 4 months till I got used to the bike then I raised it back up to normal height. The bike handled fine with the forks lowered.

I would try to lower the front the same as the link lowers the rear, that would keep all the geometry proper.  Like Gnath was trying to say, you can really only move the forks so far before you run out of clamping area and they start to taper down.  And its not that much.

 

How much is the Kouba link supposed to lower the rear?

Kray, if it helps any... the dealer lowered mine a full inch. I rode it that way for about 4 months till I got used to the bike then I raised it back up to normal height. The bike handled fine with the forks lowered.

 

It really is something you can kind of get used to in time .... my bike is tall for my 30 inch inseam but ... I scooch up on the seat at red lights and prefer to plant one foot solid rather than 2 feet tippy toe ... it really is up to you and what works. I do not want to lower my bike at all but, If I can get my feet to touch the ground a little easier from a lower seat or a lower profile rear tire ... I am all for it !!! 

and since we are on the subject here .... Race Tech offers lowering options done the right way ...  :thumbsup:

It really is something you can kind of get used to in time .... my bike is tall for my 30 inch inseam but ... I scooch up on the seat at red lights and prefer to plant one foot solid rather than 2 feet tippy toe ... it really is up to you and what works. I do not want to lower my bike at all but, If I can get my feet to touch the ground a little easier from a lower seat or a lower profile rear tire ... I am all for it !!! 

and since we are on the subject here .... Race Tech offers lowering options done the right way ...  :thumbsup:

I'm at a 30 inseam as well... I feel like lowering that little bit while I got the feel of the bike helped me out. When I raised it back up and did the race tech suspension and dunlops the bike felt really tall for me but I've become used to it. Like you... I'm way forward on the seat when I stop. I'm 80% fire road and trail riding. I want ground clearance and non restricted suspension travel for my riding. This bike is perfect for us shorter legged people! I can afford any dirt bike I want to buy but many are just too tall for me. Many KTM's etc. have seat heights 6 inches taller than this bike. If I can't reach the ground when I stop... I'd just tip over! Pretty amusing for my riding buddies but not fun for me! :-)

I'm at a 30 inseam as well... I feel like lowering that little bit while I got the feel of the bike helped me out. When I raised it back up and did the race tech suspension and dunlops the bike felt really tall for me but I've become used to it. Like you... I'm way forward on the seat when I stop. I'm 80% fire road and trail riding. I want ground clearance and non restricted suspension travel for my riding. This bike is perfect for us shorter legged people! I can afford any dirt bike I want to buy but many are just too tall for me. Many KTM's etc. have seat heights 6 inches taller than this bike. If I can't reach the ground when I stop... I'd just tip over! Pretty amusing for my riding buddies but not fun for me! :-)

 

This is why I am interested in having a custom off road only seat made ... a little lower and a little narrower will help me on the trails ...  :thumbsup:  But those specifications on the seat will make for a bad combination on the street and for that I have my Corbin ...  :thumbsup:

The Corbin is awesome on the road and while it works well off road ... for a short legged dude like me ... it is just too tall ...  :banghead:

You can move up the forks until the shiny surface of the fork tube exposed below the lower triple clamp is concealed.

Pic below shows the area in question as lined out in white lines.

250l.jpg

 

I would slide the forks all the way to the maximum distance where the triple clamps conceals the entire machined surface of the forks, and then go test the bike. 

See how the bike handles in this maxiumum alteration. Wgen you go into a turn, should you feel the steering turning more quickly than you want it to be, then lower the fork tubes down to the ground by 4mm, and then go test ride.

if it still feels like the steering is still turning more quickly  than you want it to be, or aka "knifing" too much, repleat again, w/ another 4mm change in fork protrusion. NOte, you need to be finished w/ setting up your rear sag dimensions before moving the forks around. Otherwise, you will be altering too much of the steering geometry on each pass. Do one thing at a time.

Edited by jeddclampette

 

You can move up the forks until the shiny surface of the fork tube exposed below the lower triple clamp is concealed.
Pic below shows the area in question as lined out in white lines.
 
 
I would slide the forks all the way to the maximum distance where the triple clamps conceals the entire machined surface of the forks, and then go test the bike. 
See how the bike handles in this maxiumum alteration. Wgen you go into a turn, should you feel the steering turning more quickly than you want it to be, then lower the fork tubes down to the ground by 4mm, and then go test ride.
if it still feels like the steering is still turning more quickly  than you want it to be, or aka "knifing" too much, repleat again, w/ another 4mm change in fork protrusion. NOte, you need to be finished w/ setting up your rear sag dimensions before moving the forks around. Otherwise, you will be altering too much of the steering geometry on each pass. Do one thing at a time.

 

You win best response of the day. Thank you!  :worthy:

I start by taking measuerments  from seat bolts to ground and triple clamp to ground then put in the link and try to drop the front end the same amount as the rear dropped after putting in the link -aim for a balanced lowering.

but I'm kind of a hack

You win best response of the day. Thank you!  :worthy:

 

That is the same as I said but the shorter version without pic's ...........  :p  ....  :lol:

 

take a look at your fork tubes .... you can see where you would not want to go further ...... they change shape.

Edited by gnath9

 

That is the same as I said but the shorter version without pic's ...........  :p  ....  :lol:

 

He wins because of pics. Now, you do some pop-out-book stuff and we'll re-evaluate!

You may want to check ground clearance.  There is very little to spare before lowering.  10" of ground clearance, 8.7 inches travel front and 9.4 inches travel in the rear  Hmm...

 

Just some food for thought.   :)

You may want to check ground clearance.  There is very little to spare before lowering.  10" of ground clearance, 8.7 inches travel front and 9.4 inches travel in the rear  Hmm...

 

Just some food for thought.   :)

Amanda wont be doing anything but road riding with the lowering kit on. No issues there. 

 

Well folks, I'm headed home to do this thing! I'll also be installing the fresh CRF250L-specific taillight bracket Mr. Forrest Green at Wheeling Cycle Supply was kind enough to have made up for me.  :ride:

Amanda wont be doing anything but road riding with the lowering kit on. No issues there. 

 

Well folks, I'm headed home to do this thing! I'll also be installing the fresh CRF250L-specific taillight bracket Mr. Forrest Green at Wheeling Cycle Supply was kind enough to have made up for me.  :ride:

 

Just wanted to give you a heads up.  I figure you're bound to take it for a blast every once and awhile.  I just don't want to see anyone get hurt.

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