Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Flywheel bolts sheered what do I do now

Recommended Posts

Looks just like mine! I fished out the bad stuff, flushed it good, swept it with magnets, got new bolts and a used stator. Don't panic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks just like mine! I fished out the bad stuff, flushed it good, swept it with magnets, got new bolts and a used stator. Don't panic!

His bolts sheared off though so he still has parts of those bolts in still in the threads

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He said it was fried! ya i was blowing off my loctite fixes saying it cant happen to me but i think after i painfully watched him limp his drz home from 20 miles away i think i might get on them!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

He was also wondering what should he do now, As far as the sheared bolts that are still in the threads!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah stator is fried.. My dad said I might be able to drill them and use things called easy outs and just get new bolts and a stator is that possible? how hard are the bolts that are used. In terms of drilling them out how hard is the metal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They will turn very easy. A sharp bearing pick should get them turning, they even protrude a bit out the back of the starter clutch. Look very closely at the threads. If they are egg shaped at all the new bolts won't stay tight. Clean the threads with acetone before doing the loctite. If for some reason they are stuck, try freezing the threads to shrink them. Place dry ice directly against the starter clutch or get a can of computer duster air and spray it on the threads while holding the can upside down

Bronco once said the way to fix this is to take the starter clutch and flywheel to a machine shop and have the two mated with shear pins. The press fit pins would then take the torque slam when you hit the button and the bolts would only be there to pull the two pieces together. I had planned to do exactly this to mine but have yet to do so. It is on the list for the next rebuild.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bronco once said the way to fix this is to take the starter clutch and flywheel to a machine shop and have the two mated with shear pins. The press fit pins would then take the torque slam when you hit the button and the bolts would only be there to pull the two pieces together. I had planned to do exactly this to mine but have yet to do so. It is on the list for the next rebuild.

While I did say that, and have done that procedure on two, not saying it is required.. just extra insurance. I did it on mine and one other BB Stroker, because it makes sense, and I could do it in house. 

 

The proper fastener grade, thread lock and torque is likely all that is needed.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to see that!

 

I have not always like the easy outs, but it depends on brand.  I have had good luck with tapered removers that do not involve tightening an expanding collar.

 

The bolts are going to be really hard.  I use carbide drill bits, but they are really pricey.  If you were to buy off the shelf bits, definitely use cobalt bits.  You need to establish center point of the broken bolts with a punch or center drill.  Otherwise the bit will walk all over and you could possibly hit the threads.  

 

I would use some good penetrating oil and make sure you have a good grip with the tapered remover.  I usually hit it a few times with a hammer to make sure it is seated.  The torque on those fasteners is not usually that great, hence the reason they often back out.  Just be careful to center the bit on the fastener and you should be ok.  They are small bolts, but taking your time to make sure you are drilling in the right spot will save you hours of work later on if you do not.

 

I wish you the best, and hopefully other readers will head the warning off what can happen if the loctite fixes are not taken care of now!  Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I got new bolts at a hardware store I'll try everything you guys have suggested I'll keep you updated on what happens thanks for all the good info!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zed-

Be sure of the grade on those bolts. Too soft and they will break and will be back where you started.Eric may have some input. Not sure if the bolts can be too hard in this application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zed-

Be sure of the grade on those bolts. Too soft and they will break and will be back where you started.Eric may have some input. Not sure if the bolts can be too hard in this application.

12.9 is what I use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many miles were on your bike?

 

Trying to see if maybe its something that happens around the same milage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure of the miles has a broken gauge cluster I don't think it has anything over 15000 it was used as an off-road only bike most off it's life and was just plated last year in mizzouri. The bolts were 12.9 grade so they should be good to go. Got the broken bolts out and new ones in today! Waiting on my ricky stator to come in and she should be good to go!

Edited by ZEDJUNKY93
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×