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1997 XR200R will not start please help it would make my wife's summer!

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I have a 97 XR200R It has been sitting a couple of years as it would not start.  I noticed that the decompression cable is disconnected and thought that may be the problem but I read that you dont really need it.  I kicked it 100 times last night and nothing I am getting a spark and put a new plug in.  The old plug may still have been good it was just sooty looking but I replaced it hoping it would work but no dice. The carb seems to be getting gas in it because there was a bunch in the garage floor this morning but it hasn't been removed and cleaned since I have had it over 10 years.  The bike always ran perfect then just wouldn't start when I brought it out for summer a couple year ago and has set in the garage ever since.  I was wondering if you kind people could tell me a good place to start looking for the problem?  Should I take the carb off and clean it or does it seem to be a different problem?  It has always started first or second kick before. If cleaning the carb does not work where do I go next I mean what would the next thing to try.  Any help would be greatly appreciated this bike means a lot to the family.  If I haven't given enough details let me know and I  will give the info needed. 

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Clean the carb for sure! Adjust float height, check timing, check spark by pulling the plug, grounding it to the motor, and kick it over a few times... You should see a spark if not check the wire then the coil...

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The carb seems to be getting gas in it because there was a bunch

in the garage floor this morning but it hasn't been removed and

cleaned since I have had it over 10 years.  The bike always ran

perfect then just wouldn't start when I brought it out for summer

a couple year ago and has set in the garage ever since.

 

Yes, the carburetor needs to be attended to.

 

Also, a change of engine oil is probably important now, and

again after the engine has run long enough to circulate and

warm the fresh oil.  This is primarily to relieve the crankcase

of fuel contamination that may have accumulated during

attempts to start the bike.

 

Before beginning, write down the serial # for the bike and

visit your local Honda dealer to order

 

   16010-KT0-A10 - GASKET SET

 

for under $20.  Have him confirm the p/n is correct for your

model.  Optionally, consider ordering

 

   99103-440-0350  JET, SLOW (#35)
 
for under $10.  I would suggest a number for the Main Jet

as optional, too, but several flow values are listed and I do

not know which is stock.  The main is less difficult to clean

and the bike will still idle and run up to part throttle if the

main is not perfect.

 
Use a camera set to its macro or 'flower icon' setting to

take numerous photos from various angles throughout

disassembly.

 
Remove seat & tank, then clean the bike.  Get a bag of

cheap 1" or 2" paint brushes and use these to brush dirt

away from inlet/outlet ends of carb and the cap where

the cable enters.

 
While carb is still installed, attempt to unscrew the cap

ring on top by hand (counter-clockwise).  If unable to

release by hand, wrap with a cloth and GENTLY apply

a set of Channel-Lock style pliers using only enough

squeeze to prevent slippage.  There is a prize awarded

if you avoid marking the grip bumps on the cap ring

with the plier jaws.

 
In GOOD LIGHT, pull the throttle slide out of the carb

and examine how the inner part of the throttle cable

passes through the return spring down a slot in the

slide and is held in place by the sleeve soldered at

the cable end.

 
Notice the 'V' shaped clip at the bottom of the cavity in

the top side of the throttle slide - this holds the Needle

Jet in place when the spring presses down on the 'V-clip'

 
Compress the return spring enough to be able to release

the soldered sleeve from its pocket on the underside of

the throttle slide and ease the slide off of the cable.

 
Then set the slide in a safe place, being careful not to

damage the exterior sliding surfaces, bend the Needle

Jet or loose the 'V-clip' retainer.

 

Edited by EddyCurr

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I bet if you kick it some more it will start.

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You have been taking lots of pictures, right ?

 

This would be a good time to organize a collection of clean cups/bowls
or trays suitable for small parts.

 

Remove the cap from the end of the cable and set it in a safe place.

 

Now remove the carburetor.  Start by placing a container underneath
the carb bowl and loosening the drain plug.  Use a screwdriver with a
blade large enough to fit the drain plug slot well - the plug is soft and
the slot will strip if too small a blade is applied.  Discard any fuel safely

 

(Edit:  looks like the '97 XR200R uses a hex plug at the bottom of the
bowl to drain - disregard the blade screwdriver remarks.)

 

Next take off the air cleaner-to-carb boot.  Then remove the carb from
the intake manifold.

 

Remove the bowl from the bottom of the carb.  Photograph the interior
and post here.

 

The float is delicate and should be set aside.  It is retained by a small
hinge pin mounted in two thin die-cast towers.  (There is a small valve
underneath the tab at the center of the float - this is held in place by
a wire clip and the small valve can slide off the float when the float is
removed from the carb body.  Watch out.)

 

When in good condition the float hinge pin easily slides out from the
die-cast towers.  However corrosion can make this pin difficult to remove.
Careless use of force can break one or both towers - ruining the carb
body.  If you find the pin is stuck and gentle persuasion does not free
it - ask for help here.

 

Keep taking pictures.

 

The Slow Jet is the small long brass cylinder with a screwdriver slot
- remove it.  The Main Jet is the short fatter jet with a slot - remove it.

The brass bowl is the Jet Holder - set it aside.  The Needle Jet Holder
is the longer, larger diameter cylinder that the Main Jet threads into
- remove it.

 

Remove the Idle Speed Screw and its spring from the side of the carb
- take note of its shape and its spring.

 

It looks like the Idle Mixture Screw on your carb may be inside the bowl
area - remove it, take note of its shape and spring, set it aside.

 

The trick here is to be able to easily figure out later which screw/spring
pair go where during reassembly.

Edited by EddyCurr

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kyxr200r,  still with us ?

 

A tip about the Idle Mixture Screw - the one that extends up into
the bottom of the body in the hollow formed by the pocket of the
front face of the float bowl.

 

Before removing the IMS, first gently screw it inward until it seats
lightly, carefully counting the number of turns.

 

Write this value down for use later during assembly.  Be sure
to note whether you measured your value in units of half-turns
or in full 360 turns of the screw.

Edited by EddyCurr
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I keep a 3 quart container of Chem Dip in my garage for such projects, I always seem to come across someone who needs their carb serviced, if not a project I am working on another used bike I just purchased. 

 

i.e. http://www.hardwareonlinestore.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&view=productdetails&virtuemart_product_id=79729&virtuemart_category_id=80812&Itemid=1&gclid=CJmr8uG8nb4CFUiEfgodiSwABQ

 

You can clean your existing jets in this carb cleaner and it works great, it saves the costs for replacement jets. I will usually only put in upper, or lower carb bodies in it for 10 minutes, so it does not attack the cast aluminum. 

 

The key is absolutely "NO" rubber parts are to be put in this cleaner, they swell up like Bubba's lower lip out of Forest Gump.

 

If you go this route, keep it simple, pilot jet, main jet and jet needle. If the inside of the lower carb body is pretty bad with varnish, I would dip for 5 minute intervals until clean, typically you do not need to do the upper body. 

 

Oh ya, clean the outer portion of the lower carb body before dipping. 

 

Michael 

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Here are some links, to ad to what has already been posted,  on  carb cleaning:

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/757372-fixing-carburetor-problems/#entry7745927

 

Jetting: http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/974129-99-xr-200r-jetting/#entry10611764

 

PD Carb rebuild video , just ignore the decel valve and dual cables:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1023210-carb-tutorial-coming/

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Check Craig's for a good deal on a non-start '97 XR200R.

Looks like I scared the OP off ...

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He prolly realized that it's better that the bike doesn't start and the wife stays home.

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I have cleaned the carb and it started but no the throttle is stuck wide open and I have no idea what to do.

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I have cleaned the carb and it started but no the throttle is stuck wide open and I have no idea what to do.

 

Reinstall the carb slide correctly.

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To be more specific.

The bore that the throttle slide fits into has a guide pin

midway down the side. The throttle slide has a vertical

slot.

As you prepare to insert the throttle slide into its bore in

the carb body, position the slide so that the 'cut-away'

or notch in the bottom circumference of the slide is

towards the inlet/air cleaner opening of the carb.

Set the slide into the bore, rotating it back and forth a few

degrees, feeling for the guide in the wall engaging with the

slot in the slide. When these come into alignment, the

slide will descend to the bottom of the bore or until it

makes contact with the Idle Speed Adjustment screw.

If you forced the cap down against the return spring and

tried or actually succeeded in threading the cap onto the

carb body when the slide was not aligned with the guide

pin, strip the stripes off your sleeves, go into the desert,

bury yourself up to your neck and remain silent while insects

have their way with you.

Incidently. What value did you use to set the float height ?

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There are 2 notches on the slide, one has a very long thin gap down one end to the other (left) , the other is a very short gap for adjusting your idle (right), this is as you are sitting on the bike.  

 

You will see a small indentation on the left "inside" of the carburetor, position the throttle slide with the thin line on the left side of the carb, it might take a few goes, but should finally slide into place with zero resistance. 

 

Once in place, screw top on, you should be good to go. 

 

Michael 

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I got that fixed the carb sleeve was no seated correctally but now it isnt idling right.  If I let off the throttle it just dies and it isn't the kill switch it works fine.  I turned the screw on the side of the carb which didn't seem to do anything which I shouldn't have done but I think I got it back in the same place is there something I messed up or should check.  I cant figure out why it wont idle it always did fine after it had warmed up.

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As for float height I have no idea about that I just put it back in the way it was I have never worked on one of these bike before.

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If I can get this idle thing figured out I will be set I dont have an air filter on it right now as mine had disintegrated but I do have the non foam filter on the one under the regular filter would this have anything to do with it.  Is the idle screw inside the carb or can I adjust it from outside without taking it apart? sorry for all the posts just keep thinking of things I believe that is it though.

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I was told that was the idle adjuster but since I have to keep the throttle revved a little to keep it running what is the best way to go about adjusting it?  Is there a trick to it?

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Well, I or someone here could have provided you with

the height. I was waiting for some indication that you

were following along and understood what had been

discussed so far.

Like when someone replies 'Roger that' in response to

directions from ground control ...

The Idle Speed screw is on the side of the carb body.

As mentioned by KTM, it engages with a ramp cast into

the side of the throttle slide - screw in to raise idle.

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Keep in mind that the engine will need choke and perhaps

higher RPM to remain running until it stabilizes at operating

temp.

If you set the Idle Adjustment Screw to keep the engine running

with no assistance from the throttle hand grip, then as the engine

warms to operating temp, it is likely to idle faster - perhaps much

faster - than you initially set it to run.

Because the IA screw runs sideways into the ramp in the slide,

the mechanically sympathetic way to adjust the idle speed is

to raise the slide a bit with the throttle grip as the screw is turned

in.

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