Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Trail riding.....

Recommended Posts

I was thinking...... wouldn't it be wise to install horns on your bikes?  I mean, when riding and following in a group, when spread out with pretty far distances, if the guy in the back has a problem with his bike, he can honk the horn so that the riders in front will be aware and stop down for him?  I mean, what if the pack just continues on and leave him with a stranded bike, only to be mauled by a bear a minute later?

 

And how do you guys determine who leads, who stays in the middle, and last?  Is the lead rider the one with most experience, middle for beginners, and last rider for the guy with most reliable bike?  How does it work for you more experienced folks?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its natural selection!

The weakest rider goes last, they're meant to be bear food!

Any predators will cull the pack, from the back!

Its just their nature.

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Radios or horns not needed.

The lead rider must stop at all intersections and wait for the group, including the last rider.  This keeps the group together and on route. This a good point to switch the lead rider, and the group should have a policy for rotating lead.  

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lead riders are almost always the fastest riders, but they also have to be good leaders and not leave people behind,  Gotta know the trail system, gotta be respected.  Like any other leader if you know what I mean.

 

But the cleanup person also has to be experienced, and can't be the slowest or he'll lose everyone.  My goal leading is to make sure the guy behind me sees where I turn.  If he's there, I'm betting that he's making sure the guy behind him is there as well, and so on.  But I rarely ride with more than one or two other guys because it's hard to keep the crew together (some trail systems are like a spider web, thousands of turns everywhere).  Also there is inevitably a skill spread that frustrates everyone; the most humble guy I ever met was slower than us, and he felt so bad that he was holding us up.  And he WAS holding us up, but because he had such a good attitude and was a good guy, we didn't mind so much.  But if the slower guy biatches at us for riding so fast or embarrassing him, that's the guy we won't ride with again.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lead riders are almost always the fastest riders, but they also have to be good leaders and not leave people behind,  Gotta know the trail system, gotta be respected.  Like any other leader if you know what I mean.

 

But the cleanup person also has to be experienced, and can't be the slowest or he'll lose everyone.  My goal leading is to make sure the guy behind me sees where I turn.  If he's there, I'm betting that he's making sure the guy behind him is there as well, and so on.  But I rarely ride with more than one or two other guys because it's hard to keep the crew together (some trail systems are like a spider web, thousands of turns everywhere).  Also there is inevitably a skill spread that frustrates everyone; the most humble guy I ever met was slower than us, and he felt so bad that he was holding us up.  And he WAS holding us up, but because he had such a good attitude and was a good guy, we didn't mind so much.  But if the slower guy biatches at us for riding so fast or embarrassing him, that's the guy we won't ride with again.

I think when riding trails in a group, you're only as fast as your slowest rider.  That is why it's important for the leader to know everyone's experience and ride accordingly.  I've heard of alot of stories that ended up not too well where the slower riders try to make up time and overrides and injure/kill themselves just trying to catch up with the leader.... especially with road bikes!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the fastest rider of my group of three other regulars. I offer and hand off the lead often because no one wants to that dik who's always got to be ahead.

Luckily our trails here don't split often. We make sure to stop at every interesction or 10 minutes or so for a regroup. We haul ass back if we lose contact with one another. Everone knows to ride their own ride.

I instigated this policy as being critical, like gun safety. And while not everyone was mindful at first, situations arise often enough that the guys got it pretty quick. We haven't lost anyone or left an injury unattended for more than a few minutes this way.

The main goal is for everyone to have fun. That means that the slow guy WILL get clean air for his share of the day and we'll have fun hopping logs and stuff to make the pace difference work. There is absolutely no place for attitudes in our group rides. Had a few doucherinos like that along and they never get an invite back. Slower cool guys usually get a call.

 

Horsing around and racing each other is all good as well as finding play areas for a break and to instruct the slow guys or just let them sack out for 20 minutes.

We get A LOT less riding this way but we still have a lot of fun and that's all that really matters.

 

Every now and then I'll do a solo ride or pair up with a fast guy to burn up tankfuls at race pace.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck, I ride sweep all the time when in groups.

I don't mind riding at someone else's pace.

Especially around here where you can end up facing a buggy or jeep just around the next turn.

I've not found too many guys locally, that can run off and leave me.

I found if I lead, I piss them off going on too many hard technical hills and crossings.

Sad part is I'm not that great.

I see myself more as the tortoise than the hare!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Competent riders, not necessarily fast ones, keep groups moving along...JMO. If I agree to take a newb on a group ride. Someone I trust, or myself take on the responsibility to ensure they are safe, and have a good time(usually means plenty of rest stops). Most of the guys I've ridden with are very gracious and do take on newbs...but are honest enough to say "today we're haulin' a$$, don't try chasing".

Edited by bowhunter007
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Competent riders, not necessarily fast ones, keep groups moving along...JMO. If I agree to take a newb on a group ride. Someone I trust, or myself take on the responsibility to ensure they are safe, and have a good time(usually means plenty of rest stops). Most of the guys I've ridden with are very gracious and do take on newbs...but are honest enough to say "today we're haulin' a$$, don't try chasing".

I've been in groups with newbs, and pros too.

Sometimes we split up and ride two groups.

Like I said I don't mind going with the slow guys.

There was a day I wouldn't, but I'm not that impatient anymore.

lmbo

Edited by ridngslikecrack
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been in groups with newbs, and oos too.

Sometimes we split up and ride two groups.

Like I said I don't mind going with the slow guys.

There was a day I wouldn't, but I'm not that impatient anymore.

lmbo

I'm really lucky. I fell in with a couple groups that were very patient as I relearned to ride after 23 years of not owning a bike. As far who leads & who sweeps...both should have extensive knowledge of the area, and be safety conscious for the "whole" group.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horns do work.  One of my slower (learning) buddies has one on his DR (former dual sport bike).  He uses it to signal me when he is going to be a minute on a hill or over an obstacle that may take him a minute.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not walkie talkies? Get a mount and put em up on the bars, and if you need help hit the "call" button, so it does the ringtone on everyone else's bike?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think horns are essential.  How else are you going to ridicule your riding buddy when he craters? :excuseme:

 

:smirk:

 

Also, I like it when someone else leads, I can lag back and create a gap that I can haul ass in, and not have to worry about a head-on.  I've found 3rd is usually the spot.  The first rider has to haul the mail, or ya catch 'em too quickly.  The 2nd rider usually takes that place so they can 'stay up front'....the 4th rider isn't usually concerned about being 'first', so I've found naturally, with most groups, 3rd in line is a place you can hog out your own riding paradise.  YMMV

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our lead rider has a bread dispenser that auto feeds bread into the rear sprocket, disperses the crumbs pretty well

Works good unless you lag more than a day behind

Edited by AXAxiom
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Radios or horns not needed.

The lead rider must stop at all intersections and wait for the group, including the last rider.  This keeps the group together and on route. This a good point to switch the lead rider, and the group should have a policy for rotating lead.  

 

 

The group I rode with in the GA mountains always did this. We also had some hand signals to let the next rider in line know if something was coming up, like approaching riders etc., and we would signal those riders by holding up fingers how many more riders were coming up in our group as we passed.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 dual sported bikes here, my 450 has a good loud car horn.  But with a helmet on and engine running I doubt you would hear it beyond a hundred feet.  When riding with others we stay in sight of each other.  If I'm leading I check the mirror, if I can't see the bike behind me, I slow down or stop.  If a couple minutes go by I turn around to investigate.   We trade positions every so often.   I've found that some people may be slow if they're in the back, but not so if they are leading.   I think that may have to do with picking one's own line versus following someone else's.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with a few of the posts above  , the leader needs to be aware and responsible for the riders behind him  , there should be a experienced rider in the lead if its technical , if its easy riding its not that important as long as its not a noob in the lead , i prefer a experienced rider in the lead and in the rear  , that way they know enough to watch out for the less experienced riders , and a good leader would never lead a inexperienced rider into a dangerous situation , or would at least help them thru it , even if it meant riding their bike thru it it for them

 

I also prefer to be in the rear sometimes so i can drift back some then go faster so i have some fun  , i hate going at walking pace all the time  , so in the rear at least you get to play some  , but there should always be at least 2 people in a group that can keep a eye on everyone (usually in the front and rear of the group), and a good leader will stop at all crossings , or just occasionally when riding long stretches to make sure everyone is still there and safe where the group could get separated and wait for ALL the others to show up , and give the slower riders a little break

 

Mostly i only ride with 1-4 riders (usually 1 other) so its not as critical since you know where everyone is in a small group or pair of riders , and i always switch it up and let others lead or follow so everyone has fun

Edited by 450XJimDirt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Secondly get a good rider in front and one at back. same theory as when you had one parent in front and one behind in Disneyworld

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We run most experienced up front... knows the area and is no slouch, and me (fastest) in back. I know the area too, and have a great time laughing at my friends when they fall or stall or loop out. Get the video camera and take the proof to laugh at later too.

At back I get to try the hard lines, play the game "hit their rear tire" and then pass them on those nasty uphills roosting them with dirt. I wait at the top and let them all pass

Sometimes it's no fun to wait, but better to wait behind watching them, than up front looking at trees

Edited by Greenmachine62
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×