Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Can't Stand Up On 230

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone,

 

just got my first bike ever, a 2005 Honda CRF230. 

 

I am 6ft and it seems to be impossible to stand up on the bike. When I do my back is completely hunched over and it's just very uncomfortable. 

 

I was wondering what I need to do to my bike to make this better, because according to what I have learned, I shouldn't be sitting down all the time.

Edited by niftyg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off, a CRF 230 is way too short for a 6' tall man. But since you are just learning to ride, it will work. Your easiest option is to get a set of bar risers. Tusk has them for like $20 on eBay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 6' tall myself.

I use 1" up and 1" forward risers. No problem with Renthall aluminum bars made just for the 230. Stock Cables are long enough also.

But the 230 is not a stand up and ride bike like a typical MX Bike.

It's a trail bike, the more technical the better it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off, a CRF 230 is way too short for a 6' tall man. But since you are just learning to ride, it will work. Your easiest option is to get a set of bar risers. Tusk has them for like $20 on eBay.

 

I totally disagree.  My buddy and I are both six foot tall and neither of us have any problems with our CRF230s.  Apart from an occasional tap on the knee from the handlebars they are a good size for trail and woods work.

 

 

Hey everyone,

 

just got my first bike ever, a 2005 Honda CRF230. 

 

I am 6ft and it seems to be impossible to stand up on the bike. When I do my back is completely hunched over and it's just very uncomfortable. 

 

I was wondering what I need to do to my bike to make this better, because according to what I have learned, I shouldn't be sitting down all the time.

 

What makes you think you shouldn't be sitting down most of the time?  We sit most of the time and when we are off the seat our knees are bent.  It is usually just to gain some space for rough terrain or to shift weight around.  We are never "standing" on the pegs - Not a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally disagree. My buddy and I are both six foot tall and neither of us have any problems with our CRF230s. Apart from an occasional tap on the knee from the handlebars they are a good size for trail and woods work.

What makes you think you shouldn't be sitting down most of the time? We sit most of the time and when we are off the seat our knees are bent. It is usually just to gain some space for rough terrain or to shift weight around. We are never "standing" on the pegs - Not a good idea.

For casual trail riding that's ok but if you are wanting to learn how to ride the right way (and therefore faster) then standing up at certain points is critical. Obviously you don't need to stand straight up, your knees need to be bent and you need to be in "attack" mode. I am 6'2 and I had a 230 a couple years ago for a play bike and when I stood up on it the bars were way too low for me to get into a comfortable position. That is why I suggested bar risers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 6'-2" and no problem here.  Maybe the OP has short arms like a T.Rex.  Or rather maybe I have long arms like a chimp :lol: .
 

 

I had a 230 a couple years ago for a playicon1.png bike

 

Hey, I like my play bike :ride:

Edited by mossman77
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Though a bit spendy, I've got the max rise RSW top clamp and KX High bars. At 6'1", I can stand for jumps and tech or rough sections no problem, though it's not ideal for extended crusing while standing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish to encourage you to continue to develop a standing riding style. As a new rider, this is the best time to develop good habits/techniques. Standing gives you great control (once you learn the proper techniques) and gives you about 12 more inches of suspension (leg) travel. It allows the bike to rock and roll beneath you around your low pivot point (footpegs) over rough terrain. Your body (especially lower back) will thank you. Besides, it's easy to go back to sitting any time you choose. Sort of like teaching your kid to drive with a stick shift car. They can always drive any automatic trans car, but this doesn't work the other way around. Standing correctly is tricky to learn, so I strongly recommend spending $20 on a Shane Watts beginner video. They include great practice drills.

Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What makes you think you shouldn't be sitting down most of the time?  We sit most of the time and when we are off the seat our knees are bent.  It is usually just to gain some space for rough terrain or to shift weight around. 

 

I'm 6'-2" and post a lot over rough areas.

One of my reasons not to sit down too much is that after 30 minutes, the seat on my 230F feels like a railroad track. I'd love some softer foam, but I have enough trouble getting my leg over the current seat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 6'-2" and post a lot over rough areas.

One of my reasons not to sit down too much is that after 30 minutes, the seat on my 230F feels like a railroad track. I'd love some softer foam, but I have enough trouble getting my leg over the current seat.

 

Get a XR200, much softer seat.  :thumbsup:

 

Back to the 230 cockpit issue, there is a thread on this forum about 230 cockpit size (it is small) and some fixes. 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/983931-handlebar-position-interesting-numbers/#entry10297499

 

Standing provides the best control for difficult terrain but takes practice to do it in a way that will maintain bike control and is not tiring.  Practice also builds stamina as does off bike training such as repetitive knee bends for endurance.

Two things will tire you quickly; keeping the knees bent too much except when needed, and placing weight (positive and negative) on the handle bars. So the goal should be to ride in a neutral standing position, and then anticipate and move your body so that the bars are used for controlling the bike, not for keeping you on it.  Difficult to do but practice helps.

 

Have said that I sit most of the time while trail riding, but I'm on the pegs when the pace picks up or the terrain gets difficult. Another good practice is a Trials bike (no seat).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very bizarre and interesting.  My buddy and I both feel the CRF230 is WAY more comfortable and controllable than any XR250 we've ridden.  We are both 6 feet tall and we both find the newer ergonomics far superior the the XR250s we used to ride.  I've ridden XR200s and also find the newer ergonomics of the CRF230 far superior.  We were never able to move around on the XR250s like we can on the CRF230.  My buddy just installed an A-Loop kit on his late-model XR250 for the very same reason.

 

A far as "standing" goes you are never really standing.  You should be elevated just above the seat with your knees bent.  This is to give you clearance so you can maneuver the bike in difficult terrain.  The better your suspension is the less "standing" and clearance you need.  If your bike has bad, improper, or worn suspension you will find yourself off the seat all the time.  Your knees should never be locked or even close to being locked unless you are stretching on an even, straight section to relieve tension.  If you get too tired from your knees being bent you are out of shape.  You need more practice and training.  Period.

Standing equals faster lap times?  Depends upon the track and terrain.  Standing results in a much higher center of gravity.  A few inches off the seat is one thing.  Standing up is another thing.  Sitting on a stock CRF230 while riding aggressively, for example, is impossible.  The suspension is so bad it will nearly throw you off the bike and you must stay elevated above the seat.  Throw on a set of great forks and a great shock and you can sit 80% of the time.  We should be careful to keep our recommendations within the context of the rider's bike and skills.

Edited by VortecCPI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unless it really warrants standing. Just lazier as I get older.

Which begs the question: what warrants standing? I'm plenty old, maybe a decade more than @stevethe. Its not as much pure lazyness, but rather I'm not in the shape I was when I was in my twenties.

I'm by no means a fast rider, I ride for fun. I probably sit 85% of the time, but that still means posting frequently for short periods. Its a real workout for my legs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which begs the question: what warrants standing? I'm plenty old, maybe a decade more than @stevethe. Its not as much pure lazyness, but rather I'm not in the shape I was when I was in my twenties.

I'm by no means a fast rider, I ride for fun. I probably sit 85% of the time, but that still means posting frequently for short periods. Its a real workout for my legs.

 

Yeah I'm actually older now gotta be 57 last time I checked. I gotta stop checking. :rolleyes:

 

I've ridden almost every weekend since the age of 4 you would of thought I would be in awesome shape by now. :lol:  But sitting is about 90% of the time. If it's a serious hill climb I will get my butt off the seat. High speed riding over real rough stuff generally gets gets faster speeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just rotated my hi-rise bars forward on mine to try it out.  It opens up the cockpit considerably.  I feel more naturally stretched out and standing feels much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very bizarre and interesting.  My buddy and I both feel the CRF230 is WAY more comfortable and controllable than any XR250 we've ridden.  We are both 6 feet tall and we both find the newer ergonomics far superior the the XR250s we used to ride.  I've ridden XR200s and also find the newer ergonomics of the CRF230 far superior.  We were never able to move around on the XR250s like we can on the CRF230.  My buddy just installed an A-Loop kit on his late-model XR250 for the very same reason.

 

A far as "standing" goes you are never really standing.  You should be elevated just above the seat with your knees bent.  This is to give you clearance so you can maneuver the bike in difficult terrain.  The better your suspension is the less "standing" and clearance you need.  If your bike has bad, improper, or worn suspension you will find yourself off the seat all the time.  Your knees should never be locked or even close to being locked unless you are stretching on an even, straight section to relieve tension.  If you get too tired from your knees being bent you are out of shape.  You need more practice and training.  Period.

Standing equals faster lap times?  Depends upon the track and terrain.  Standing results in a much higher center of gravity.  A few inches off the seat is one thing.  Standing up is another thing.  Sitting on a stock CRF230 while riding aggressively, for example, is impossible.  The suspension is so bad it will nearly throw you off the bike and you must stay elevated above the seat.  Throw on a set of great forks and a great shock and you can sit 80% of the time.  We should be careful to keep our recommendations within the context of the rider's bike and skills.

My comments on standing were based on riding a Trials bike and learning to survive trail riding one.  Posture is not the goal, having your body in the proper position before the bike moves is the goal, sorta like riding a Segway. Riding a Trials bike is like an intensive Riding 101 course, you learn a lot. Standing provides the best control of the MC for rough terrain, hill climbing, descending, fast speed, etc. Of course at my age I would like to sit all of the time, which is why I like XR seats. :lol:

 

Glad you like the cockpit size on the 230, Honda must have designed it for your riding preferences. 

Did you read the thread on 230 cockpits?

 

The 230s are smaller than any other full size off road motorcycle, and a few cm here and there can make a big difference in comfort and control.  You can enlarge the cockpit with bar risers, off set clamps, bar style,   and bar position, which is the reason for the linked thread.   I have a friend who likes mini bikes but he enlarges the cockpits to near full size, he even stretched one with a 5" frame splice.  I'm not large at 5'8" but I'm most comfortable and feel like I have the most room to move in controlling the MC when riding a full size cockpit, and it seems the least tiring.  Maybe that is a comfort zone from past experiences.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×