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Ebc Brake Issue

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I have the Ebc rotor with stock caliper, SS line and gsxr 1000 perch and master cylinder. I lifted the bike to take the rear tire off and checked the front while it was in the air. I found it was VERY hard to rotate. Is there a good procedure to give more clearance between the pads and rotor?

It stops amazingly well and I doesn't feel like it is holding the bike back. I bought it with the current brake setup so I would like some advice from someone who installed it.

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By design, the pistons in the caliper should very slightly retract when you let off the brakes (due to the piston seals)... so some light drag is normal.  When you installed the pads in the caliper, were you able to fully retract the pistons, i.e. push the pads apart fully?  When you put the wheel in place, there should have been a gap between the pads and rotor.  So normally you have to pump the lever a few times to push out the pistons/pads to get brake pressure.

 

If there is a lot of drag I would first start with checking the brake lever and ensuring there is some free play in it.  Second, check the brake fluid level in the MC.  If it’s too high, it doesn't leave room for the fluid to expand when it warms up.  Third, remove the wheel and push apart the pads.  Then reinstall the wheel and verify that it spins with little drag.  Fourth, bleed the brakes and put in new fluid.  And finally if all else fails it could be due to stuck/cocked pistons in the caliper and/or bad piston seals.

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By design, the pistons in the caliper should very slightly retract when you let off the brakes (due to the piston seals)... so some light drag is normal. When you installed the pads in the caliper, were you able to fully retract the pistons, i.e. push the pads apart fully? When you put the wheel in place, there should have been a gap between the pads and rotor. So normally you have to pump the lever a few times to push out the pistons/pads to get brake pressure.

If there is a lot of drag I would first start with checking the brake lever and ensuring there is some free play in it. Second, check the brake fluid level in the MC. If it’s too high, it doesn't leave room for the fluid to expand when it warms up. Third, remove the wheel and push apart the pads. Then reinstall the wheel and verify that it spins with little drag. Fourth, bleed the brakes and put in new fluid. And finally if all else fails it could be due to stuck/cocked pistons in the caliper and/or bad piston seals.

Like I said, I did not install the rotor, pads, MC or perch so I do not know.

I know there is free play in the lever, but I don't remember seeing the fluid level change when I checked that last night. As far as fluid, what dot should I use if I change the fluid?

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Like I said, I did not install the rotor, pads, MC or perch so I do not know.

I know there is free play in the lever, but I don't remember seeing the fluid level change when I checked that last night. As far as fluid, what dot should I use if I change the fluid?

 

Okay, even more reason to check it if you didn't do it yourself.

 

Good, I would use DOT 4.

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Okay, even more reason to check it if you didn't do it yourself.

Good, I would use DOT 4.

Yeah I know. I've already fixed a couple things with this DRZ. My other was nearly stock. I'm not a brake expert yet :p

Haven't had it a week yet, and only rode it two long times because Michigan is covered with water lately. :o

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Okay, even more reason to check it if you didn't do it yourself.

Good, I would use DOT 4.

Could not see the fluid level. Found the rubber gasket deformed/sucked down into the fluid. Now I can see the fluid level and it is half way between the upper and lower after that. Wheel rotates a bit easier now.

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If it were my bike, I'd do a full system drain, flush and bleed, for both front and rear.  It's too easy to do compared to the hassle of rebuilding brakes because the previous owner never did the annual job.  Yes, it is an annual job unless you have installed Teflon lined S.S. braided lines.

 

Considering your symptoms, your master cylinder may also need inspection and cleaning or adjustment for the pressure release point when the lever is fully released.  There is a very small port that has to open back to the reservoir to release pressure in the lines.

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