Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Oil at cylinder base

Recommended Posts

Does anyone know if there's a known issue with oil leakages at the base of the cylinder of a xr600r? I can't seem to find the origin of the leakage. Is there a lot of oil pressure down there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard of some leaks at the base, but more of an issue with the DR650's than the XR.  There is not much oil pressure ANYWHERE in the XR series motors, they seem to be lubed more on flow than anything...  The oil is supplied to the head via the external tube and then drains down through passages drilled into the cylinder.

 

Unless it is a serious quantity of oil I would just wait until it is time to do the inevitable top end and just install a new gasket with a small amount of sealer...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is probably seeping out of the cylinder base gasket. Has the eninge been rebuilt? If you have the jug off and do not seal up the engine case seam, it will weap oil. I have also heard rumors of the new plastic base gaskets that Cometic provide in their top end kits are prone to leaking oil. I have two of them out in the shop that I did not use for that reason.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is probably seeping out of the cylinder base gasket. Has the eninge been rebuilt? If you have the jug off and do not seal up the engine case seam, it will weap oil. I have also heard rumors of the new plastic base gaskets that Cometic provide in their top end kits are prone to leaking oil. I have two of them out in the shop that I did not use for that reason.

the engine was in fact rebuilt, so I suppose you're right. I'll seal it next time then, or do you have alternatives?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine seems to be doin the same thing. I've only had the bike for several months now and it had been rebuilt just before I got it. So I'm guessin those Cometic kits are the problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only alternatives that come to mind are to deal with it or pull the cylinder and replace the gasket. If the engine was recently rebuilt, you can probably pull the jug off without having to replace your rings. You will need a new head gasket though so you are looking at about $50 in parts and whatever your time's worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thnx, just rebuilt it, so I'll wait for a while. Nice way to tell whether there's still oil in the engine ;) what brand gaskets should I be using next time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thnx, just rebuilt it, so I'll wait for a while. Nice way to tell whether there's still oil in the engine ;) what brand gaskets should I be using next time?

It's hard to go wrong with OE gaskets. Cometic for the head gasket. Stay away from the Moose gasket kit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oil leaks aren't necessarily a problem if they're from a benign location.  But you'll want to verify that the oil is definitely coming from the crankcase seam of the base gasket.  If the oil leak is coming from a cracked oil line, that's important to fix.  The location of an oil leak can be found by cleaning the area very well, then covering a dusting of talcum powder.  Any oil leaks will be easy to see.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its seems to be leaking at one of the two "open", reachable bolts at the base . Should there be oil flowing through here?

1401480328582.jpg

Edited by okay73

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oil can flow ANYWHERE down there if the gasket is not sealing properly.  I don't know if folks are putting the gaskets on dry, which I suppose could be the greater issue, I use Permatex Grey when I installed mine.  Head gasket went on dry, as it should.

 

If you are that concerned about it, pull the head and jug (very easy) and install a new gasket.  Use a SMALL amount of sealer on both sides and re-assemble...

 

By the way, do NOT put too much torque on those small bolts!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand, but the funny thing is that the oil seems to come uo through the hole of the bolt and not at the base itself. .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm probably late to the party, but what's the issue with the Moose gasket kit again?

They are essentially junk. There is a paper valve cover gasket (stock is a steel gasket), the head gasket is cheesy and the general quality of the gaskets is not great. I ended up buying OEM gaskets to replace several of the gaskets from the Moose kit during my last rebuild. When I do it again, I will just buy the OEM gaskets than I actually need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the cause of the oil leakage. A crack in the cylinder

Is it a crack or is it just a casting artifact? It is not uncommon to see things like that on the inside of castings. There was a core in that empty space when the part was cast... the cores are not perfect and often times leave rough spots behind. If it is a crack, welding is the first choice for repair. My experience with trying to get oily alluminum of unknown alloy welded has been sketchy. The other alternative is to clean it really well (solvent followed with soap/water), rough it up and hit it with some JB weld. My stator cover has about 6000 miles on an internal JBWeld patch (shifter puncture). I had the cover off this winter and it is still doing great. The previous owner of my bike did the first JB Weld repair and it was failing miserably... starting to peel away. I can only assume that it was due to poor prep (he was, afterall a complete fool).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it a crack or is it just a casting artifact? It is not uncommon to see things like that on the inside of castings. There was a core in that empty space when the part was cast... the cores are not perfect and often times leave rough spots behind. If it is a crack, welding is the first choice for repair. My experience with trying to get oily alluminum of unknown alloy welded has been sketchy. The other alternative is to clean it really well (solvent followed with soap/water), rough it up and hit it with some JB weld. My stator cover has about 6000 miles on an internal JBWeld patch (shifter puncture). I had the cover off this winter and it is still doing great. The previous owner of my bike did the first JB Weld repair and it was failing miserably... starting to peel away. I can only assume that it was due to poor prep (he was, afterall a complete fool).

The picture doesn't show it clearly enough, but I think it is a crack. The locationof italso explaines the stange oil exit, as I mentioned earlierin this thread.

Just gave it to a metal workshop. They're going to weld it as good as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The picture doesn't show it clearly enough, but I think it is a crack. The locationof italso explaines the stange oil exit, as I mentioned earlierin this thread.

Just gave it to a metal workshop. They're going to weld it as good as possible.

I took my stator cover to a marine welder in town. He tried, but all it would do is splatter and make a big mess. Hopefully, yours works out. I bet it is a casting defect... always been there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×