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Rekluse Core EXP 3.0 Clutch install: KX250F

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Received from RMATV last night. Installed today after work. Fast, easy installation. Took about an hour, but that is because I am a perfectionist...and slow. Worked perfectly from the start.

 

INSTALLATION NOTES

 

- In the EXP installation video they recommend laying the bike on its side so you don't have to drain the oil. Unfortunately, I watched the Core EXP installation video (since that is what I bought). They mention laying the bike on its side for the install but neglect to mention that it let's you do the install without draining oil, only saying it makes the install much easier. Well, it was time to change the oil anyway. To be fair, they do mention that you don't have to drain the oil in the first page of the included install manual. RTFM.

 

- They want you to torque the clutch hub nut to 50 foot-pounds but not use an impact wrench. I have calibrated torque sticks but was paranoid, so I used a clutch holding tool (Tusk) to hold the hub while tightening the nut. Applying the brake with the bike in gear to hold the hub while you tighten the nut (which is what they recommend) doesn't work with the KX.

 

- For the KX250F, you have to add a spacer between the rear brake and the bike so it will clear the clutch cover. Remember to remove the existing washer and put it in a safe place. Might as well clean and re-grease the brake pivot while you are at it, and add a little on each side of the spacer. Don't forget to use Loctite on the bolt (tighten to 18 ft-lb)!

 

- Slightly larger clutch cover increases oil volume slightly. My guess is maybe 30 cc or less. Refill oil as usual and you should have plenty. I always use 900 cc when I change filters anyway.

 

- For the KL250F you do NOT receive a "thin steel drive plate" as it says in the installation manual. All the steel plates (provided by Rekluse) are the same thickness. They don't tell you this in the manual, but a call to Boise brought an answer in about one minute. You use 7 of your existing 8 friction disks.

 

- The only "glitch" I ran into was when setting the "starting point" of the pressure plate adjuster. The adjuster is aluminum and came from the factory a little bit tight. To set the starting point, I had to back it out until there was no pressure, then tighten until it just starts to make contact with the center clutch nut. Then you tighten the adjuster 1 turn plus two tick marks. Being aluminum, the bottom started to gall and made it hard to adjust. I pulled it off and put a bit of grease on the bottom. Problem solved.

 

BREAK-IN

Basically a non-event. After checking the free play gain with the rubber band they provide, you just rev the bike repeatedly. Next you do starts/stops without the clutch in first and second gear. That's it! Done deal.

 

PERFORMANCE

I did a bunch of simulated starts, tooled around the parking lot and the field across the street popping wheelies and goofing off, blistered down the road to check shifting, locked up the brakes, and generally wrung out the machine without ever touching the clutch. Never stalled. Easy as pie. Clutch felt and worked exactly the same, just didn't need it.

 

I'm very happy with this clutch and consider it a great upgrade. Next step is to get my lovely wife back on this bike without the need for her to coordinate a clutch.  :ride:

Edited by LSHD

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So what exactly does this clutch do does it eliminate having to shift down while holding the couch lever in if you switch from 3rd to 2nd?

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So what exactly does this clutch do does it eliminate having to shift down while holding the couch lever in if you switch from 3rd to 2nd?

you don't need clutch to down shift anyway let off throttle and down shift. Even if you are up shifting you don't always need to use clutch wrap out whatever gear unload tranny a hair n up shift don't force it but it's just like a car once you know shift points you don't always need the clutch. I use clutch for ripping out of corners but I'm thinking about getting rekluse my brother has one in his bike same as mine n loves it

Braaaaap :p

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13kx450f is right on. You don't need the clutch to shift up or down. You can manipulate the throttle a little bit to get a cleaner upshift. But certainly downshifting needs nothing but backing off the throttle and slamming that shifter down into the corner. Gary Semics has a nice write up on this in the riding tips section. See his tip #4.

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/500641-10-absolute-mx-practice-tips-by-gary-semics/

 

To be clear, you can use the clutch exactly as you always do. You just don't need it to stop, slam on the rear brake, start, etc. The bike won't stall when you fall over. It's just a nice feature, especially if you ride a lot of trails on a bike really meant for the track...like mine. :ride:

Edited by LSHD
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