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Battery Issue

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Hello, It's been a while since I have posted. I have had my CRF 250L for about a year now and have been enjoying it with no issues. During the winter months it would sit for weeks at a time with no tender connected and fire right up when I went to crank it. Yesterday I rode it for a little and forgot to turn off the switch. The battery is completely dead with no info coming on the screen. I tried hooking a tender up to it but it will not switch the tender to charging mode. I moved the tender to my lawn mower and it switched immediately. I jumped it off and kept it revved for a few minutes hoping the battery would get some charge but the display screen just flashed and it died. Is my battery done? Thanks for the help!

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Hello, It's been a while since I have posted. I have had my CRF 250L for about a year now and have been enjoying it with no issues. During the winter months it would sit for weeks at a time with no tender connected and fire right up when I went to crank it. Yesterday I rode it for a little and forgot to turn off the switch. The battery is completely dead with no info coming on the screen. I tried hooking a tender up to it but it will not switch the tender to charging mode. I moved the tender to my lawn mower and it switched immediately. I jumped it off and kept it revved for a few minutes hoping the battery would get some charge but the display screen just flashed and it died. Is my battery done? Thanks for the help!

Sounds done. Unless your tender came off battery (unlikely), your battery sounds like toast.

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Sounds done. Unless your tender came off battery (unlikely), your battery sounds like toast.

 

I honestly do not know for a fact but, a battery tender is very different from a battery charger and my guess is that you need a charger. Maybe if you left it on long enough it would kick in....  :excuseme:

 

I doubt very much you can ruin the battery by just leaving the key on. 

Edited by gnath9
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I honestly do not know for a fact but, a battery tender is very different from a battery charger and my guess is that you need a charger. Maybe if you left it on long enough it would kick in.... :excuseme:

I doubt very much you can ruin the battery by just leaving the key on.

He could be right. Definitely worth a try. Maybe jump it and take it for a ride for a bit then try tender. If you have a charger, then just try charging it first (slowly, low power).

I was thinking leaving key on was just last straw for a battery that sat a lot (bad for battery). But I am by no means a battery professional haha.

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You should be able to save it, its not good on them to be drained completely but doing it once usually isnt a death sentence.  Like gnath said, a tender isnt a charger, and if it sees the voltage is to low in the battery it will not even try to "tend" it.  If you have a charger, use that.  If not, you can try to "trick" the tender.  Connect your bike battery and lawn tractor battery together, then put the tender on the lawn tractor battery.  This way the tender thinks its hooked up to a proper battery because it sees the voltage in the good one, but the CRF battery will take a charge from both the lawn tractor battery and the tender.  Iv used this method before of hooking two batteries together to get the "smart" chargers to actually come on and start charging.  Things like tenders and the new smart chargers will look at the voltage and if its not within a certain range they will not even turn on and try to charge the battery.  So by hooking another battery up to the mix it basically fools it.  Usually when you have a DEAD battery like this the key is not to leave it dead for long, when they are left dead is when they start to break down inside so the longer you leave it that way the more damage is done.

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You should be able to save it, its not good on them to be drained completely but doing it once usually isnt a death sentence.  Like gnath said, a tender isnt a charger,

Thanks Tro1086 ...  :thumbsup:

 

I knew somebody could put it into words  ...  :lol:  

Plus I am at work today and do not have time to write a long story .. I hate working Saturdays ...   :rant:

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Most if not all tenders do not have high enough voltage to charge a AGM battery let alone a dead one with no current flow. Do your self a favor and Google charging AGM battery's.Check your local bike shop they may have a deepcycle high voltage AGM charger something like the one Optima sells

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I honestly do not know for a fact but, a battery tender is very different from a battery charger and my guess is that you need a charger. Maybe if you left it on long enough it would kick in....  :excuseme:

 

I doubt very much you can ruin the battery by just leaving the key on.

You would think a battery is a battery but when these AGM(absorbed glass mat)batterys came out around year 2000 all bets were off I went to a special service school just to learn about them and yes you can ruin one just by leaving the key on

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Thanks for all the info. I only have a battery tender now but I will borrow a charger. If I try the "tricking the battery method" Tro1086 talked about do I just connect the two + terminals together? Thanks again!

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Yes connect + to + and - to -, just like if you were jumpstarting it.  It would probably be easiest and best to just take the battery out of the bike while your doing this.  You can hook the two batteries up with anything you can find, small jumper cables if you have them, or just some wires, or iv even layed one battery ontop of the other before, if the terminals line up hahaha. 

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Yes connect + to + and - to -, just like if you were jumpstarting it.  It would probably be easiest and best to just take the battery out of the bike while your doing this.  You can hook the two batteries up with anything you can find, small jumper cables if you have them, or just some wires, or iv even layed one battery ontop of the other before, if the terminals line up hahaha. 

Thanks, got it charging now. The tender is working this way.

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Tro1086's trick worked. The bike is up and running again. I let it run for a while then hooked the tender back up to it. The green charged light came on in less than a minute. Thanks for all the help!

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I have the same issue. I have had the crf 250l just over and year with no issues. But now the battery does not seem to want to charge. Drove it on a 20 mile ride and did charge.  I check with O'Reilly and they show the replacement battery must be a factory charged battery. Whats that about.   

Edited by Titan

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I bought the Shorai LFX14L2-BS12 from Motorcycle Superstore and haven't looked back. Lighter weight and increased capacity for running accessory lighting or heated riding gear. I also have a USB charger that is connected all the time. I have been using a Battery Tender to keep it topped off during extended "rest periods". My stock Yuasa battery didn't last that long, but other Yuasa batteries have lasted for years. Go figure....

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I bought the Shorai LFX14L2-BS12 from Motorcycle Superstore and haven't looked back. Lighter weight and increased capacity for running accessory lighting or heated riding gear. I also have a USB charger that is connected all the time. I have been using a Battery Tender to keep it topped off during extended "rest periods". My stock Yuasa battery didn't last that long, but other Yuasa batteries have lasted for years. Go figure....

 

My stock battery is still working fine and I have never put a tender on it and the bikes sits all the time ..... 2200 mile in 3 years is all I got 

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2200 miles in three years?

You need to get out more!!

 

He ment 2200 miles to and from the shop to get mod's done

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