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ARROW Exhaust pipe and muffler

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Hello guys.

Has anyone installed Arrow exhaust pipe (72096PD)?

Arrow produces three different aftermarket exhaust muffler. Does anyone have one of these?

I've seen those, but I've never heard of anyone owning one.  Sorry I couldn't help you.

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Hello guys. I bought the 72096PD arrow exhaust pipe. (Picture 1). Seems like a good product.

Now I have to continue my search for a good aftermarket exhaust muffler.

My goal is a lightweight exhaust system that does not rust, however I do not want a noisy system.

Maybe I've found what I'm looking for and I share this information to those who have my same goal.

Arrow exhaust sistem has 90 DB, only two more than stock muffler.

The characteristics of Arrow aftermarket exhaust in picture 2 and 3

1403461670585.jpg

1403461698040.jpg

1403461726548.jpg

Edited by Crossplayer
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I thought about getting an Arrow system for mine but was put off by how long the muffler looks. It is almost the length of the back fender which hangs out longer than most. I suppose shortening it wouldn't be too hard. They are also very expensive compared to the American made products.

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 Looks like the dyno chart blows the stock system out of the water. However usually there isn't much to be gained on a stock bike. But there it is in print.

 

When I modified my BBR pipe into a stepped header type pipe with a larger machined spigot I noticed more top end and better all around. The header was originally from a late model KX250. I should mention the bike is a built 230-250cc.

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When run on a dyno the bikes are always re-jetted to obtain best numbers.  They simply compared the completely-stock CRF230 to a CRF230 re-jetted with their system.  Mike Coe has found the CRF230 to make just under 18 HP at the rear wheel when running a 120 main and stock exhaust.  This is exactly what they are showing.

 

Mike Coe found the BBR system gained 0.6 peak RHWP but lost average torque (i.e., area under the curve).

Edited by VortecCPI
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When run on a dyno the bikes are always re-jetted to obtain best numbers.  They simply compared the completely-stock CRF230 to a CRF230 re-jetted with their system.  Mike Coe has found the CRF230 to make just under 18 HP at the rear wheel when running a 120 main and stock exhaust.  This is exactly what they are showing.

 

Mike Coe found the BBR system gained 0.6 peak RHWP but lost average torque (i.e., area under the curve).

 

Your probably right on the jetting from pipe to pipe.

 

I would find it interesting that a BBR pipe lost any down low on a stocker. 0.6 increase sounds about right. It has a very small spigot and head pipe though. I would imagine the stockers do also. Wondering if the jetting was off. From nearly the worst pipe to the best there isn't the biggest difference especially on a stocker.

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Your probably right on the jetting from pipe to pipe.

 

I would find it interesting that a BBR pipe lost any down low on a stocker. 0.6 increase sounds about right. It has a very small spigot and head pipe though. I would imagine the stockers do also. Wondering if the jetting was off. From nearly the worst pipe to the best there isn't the biggest difference especially on a stocker.

 

I traded a few emails with Mike way back in 2009 regarding the exhaust systems for these bikes.  Mike told me not to waste my time and money so I didn't.  He said the 0.6 RWHP peak increase wasn't worth the losses everywhere else.  This is why he uses a stock system ion his 27+ RWHP monster 230.

I will be testing and reviewing an Engines Only Outlaw system in about a month when they are available.  Frank now uses a stepped head pipe and full stainless steel construction.  They did a big test on a bunch of systems years ago and found his system had the broadest overall torque curve.  Not necessarily the highest peak HP, but the broadest torque.  This is very important for the type of riding we do on these bikes.

It is worth noting Frank's main jet recommendation is proof his system is getting spent gasses out of the combustion chamber.  I could not believe how small the main jet is he recommends for use with his systems.  I am very much looking forward to getting my hands on one.

Peak numbers are useless.  Net area under the curve is what matters.

Edited by VortecCPI

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Peak hp can be quite usefull it depends on what you are going to do with it. The CRF 230's are already torque monsters.

 

I totally agree in certain contexts.  Again, though, for the type of riding we do torque is king.

A great comparison is the XR250 we have.  A properly-jetted XR250 makes 20 RWHP, which is 2 RWHP more than a properly-jetted CRF230.  The XR250 has a great engine.  It makes great midrange power and decent top-end power.  The low-end, however, isn't even close to the CRF230.  On tight technical trails our CRF230s absolutely smoke the XR250.  No contest at all.  On longer trails with fewer turns and technical sections the XR250 begins to really shine.

 

I have learned over the years broad power is far more useful than peak power in almost all circumstances.  I'd much prefer a 502 ci BB Chevy with a mountain of broad torque than a 302 ci SB Chevy with peak HP occurring at 8,000+ RPM.  When I was in my 20s, however, that was definitely NOT the case.  The camshaft in my 4-speed 79 Camaro was so big the SB only made about 8-10 inches of vacuum at idle.  The power brakes would quit working after a few minutes at idle.  It sounded incredible and with the basement rear end was very fast if you knew how to use (slip) a clutch and throw a stick.  Today I would opt for a mild BB with street gears.

 

The Al Baker XR265s we had were also insane.  No low-end, soft midrange, and insane top end.  The guys at Al Baker's said the twin-carb fully-built engines like ours were making 30+ HP at the rear wheel.  They advised us to wear earplugs and only shift when the engine quit pulling, not when it sounded like it was going to grenade.  Those bikes were SCARY fast and made crazy power.  Today I much prefer the CRF230 torque monster.

 

To each his own...

Edited by VortecCPI

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Looks like the dyno chart blows the stock system out of the water. However usually there isn't much to be gained on a stock bike. But there it is in print.

When I modified my BBR pipe into a stepped header type pipe with a larger machined spigot I noticed more top end and better all around. The header was originally from a late model KX250. I should mention the bike is a built 230-250cc.

As I have stated before in other posts, the header pipe and muffler that comes with the purchase of a complete BBR frame assembly is different than there pipes they sell to the public for stock bikes.

They do not have a restrictor in the header pipe where it bolts up to the cylinder head.

They come with a larger header pipe and muffler connector pipe.

Plus they are coated with a silver high temp exhaust coating that does not discolor and surprisingly the muffler is considerably more quiet than the obnoxious/loud mufflers they sell to the general public for stock bikes.

Seems like they would make all of there mufflers more quiet since they are able to make the BBR frame kit mufflers quieter?

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When run on a dyno the bikes are always re-jetted to obtain best numbers. They simply compared the completely-stock CRF230 to a CRF230 re-jetted with their system. Mike Coe has found the CRF230 to make just under 18 HP at the rear wheel when running a 120 main and stock exhaust. This is exactly what they are showing.

Mike Coe found the BBR system gained 0.6 peak RHWP but lost average torque (i.e., area under the curve).

I agree...

There aftermarket pipe was jetted properly on the Dyno before posting the graph.

The stock muffler graph was an untouched bone stock bike.

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As I have stated before in other posts, the header pipe and muffler that comes with the purchase of a complete BBR frame assembly is different than there pipes they sell to the public for stock bikes.

They do not have a restrictor in the header pipe where it bolts up to the cylinder head.

They come with a larger header pipe and muffler connector pipe.

Plus they are coated with a silver high temp exhaust coating that does not discolor and surprisingly the muffler is considerably more quiet than the obnoxious/loud mufflers they sell to the general public for stock bikes.

Seems like they would make all of there mufflers more quiet since they are able to make the BBR frame kit mufflers quieter?

I'm not sure there was any restrictor that was in my BBR pipe. It was just a somewhat small spigot. The header was also small but not the mid pipe into the muffler it's quite large.

Your right the muffler appears to work surprisingly well.

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