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Is a vintage bike worth it?

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A friend of mine has a '86 kx125 for 650 and I was wondering if it was worth getting because it is hard to find parts for the older models. Do any of you guys know of a good website to get parts for it?

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Its not worth it. $1500 can get you a modern 250 two stroke now.

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A friend of mine has a '86 kx125 for 650 and I was wondering if it was worth getting because it is hard to find parts for the older models. Do any of you guys know of a good website to get parts for it?

 

If your just looking for a bike to ride and have some fun on, find something a bit newer (95ish and up) with more parts availability.  Vintage bikes you have to want to own and deal with parts availability, uniqueness of one year only models ect...  So like the other guy said, it is not worth it if you just want a bike to ride.

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A friend of mine has a '86 kx125 for 650 and I was wondering if it was worth getting because it is hard to find parts for the older models. Do any of you guys know of a good website to get parts for it?

Yes they are. Not all models mind you, but there are a few out there worth some bucks. For example, a lot of 70's and 80's bikes are a good start. You can still find parts for them, but you have to really work hard at it to find them. Take Maico for example, I owned on back in the 80's (83 Spider 490). Back then I picked it up for less than nothing. Fixed it up, and it was a really nice bike to ride. I ended up getting rid of it thinking I'd just get another later one. Well that later on (20-30 years later), that very same bike is now upwards to $5000-$7500 depending on it's condition. A lot of 70's bikes are worth good bucks now a days. It's a matter of finding someone that has one sitting in their garage for decades and willing to let it go cheap. :devil:

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If your just looking for a bike to ride and have some fun on, find something a bit newer (95ish and up) with more parts availability. Vintage bikes you have to want to own and deal with parts availability, uniqueness of one year only models ect... So like the other guy said, it is not worth it if you just want a bike to ride.

I would ride through fields and trails do you think it would be a good bike to move up from my crf150f?

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I would ride through fields and trails do you think it would be a good bike to move up from my crf150fL

Let's just say that coming off of a little 150cc 4 stroke to a 125cc 2 stroke is like........... going from an amusement fun kart to a racing kart!  I

 

If you haven't felt the powerband of a 2 stroke when it hits yet then, you have no clue until you actually experience it. 

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Let's just say that coming off of a little 150cc 4 stroke to a 125cc 2 stroke is like........... going from an amusement fun kart to a racing kart! I

If you haven't felt the powerband of a 2 stroke when it hits yet then, you have no clue until you actually experience it.

the only 2 stroke I have ridden was a 65, and an 80 but I have never owned one before

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Get it and behold the pipe. When you get on the pipe, you find your soul.

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For 650, it should be in really good shape.

I'll post some pics when I get some

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Let's just say that coming off of a little 150cc 4 stroke to a 125cc 2 stroke is like........... going from an amusement fun kart to a racing kart! I

If you haven't felt the powerband of a 2 stroke when it hits yet then, you have no clue until you actually experience it.

You are talking like the "powerband" is a part of the engine that kicks in... You really should brush up on moto knowledge

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I like the 70s yamaha 2 strokes myself.For me finding parts and doing mods. is half the fun.If you are not into working on your bike and just want something to ride,then get something less than 15 years old.I would say a kdx 200 would be a better bike to ride.

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I like the 70s yamaha 2 strokes myself.For me finding parts and doing mods. is half the fun.If you are not into working on your bike and just want something to ride,then get something less than 15 years old.I would say a kdx 200 would be a better bike to ride.

I like working on bikes I just don't want to be working on the bike all the day, or more than I ride it. Do you have any idea what will go wrong in it and how often?

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I think you should stay away from the motocross bikes.They have awesome top end,but unless you like to ride aggressively all the time and don't mind changing plugs all the time,they are a pain for a average Sunday rider.I think you should look at buying a 4 stroke enduro.My nephew has a honda crf 230 and he really likes it.My brother has a crf 150 and he really likes his bike too.4 strokes are much easier on gas and you may have to change a plug once a year.Keep the air filter clean and change your oil and your good to go.

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You are talking like the "powerband" is a part of the engine that kicks in... You really should brush up on moto knowledge

 

 

  Um, he's right.   ;)

It's when a two stroke "comes on the pipe" (Hit's it powerband, the part of it's rpm range where the bike makes crazy horsepower.  Could be from 3,000-10,000+rpm depending on the bike.

WHEREVER that fat part is, it's described as the powerband of the bike.  

A trait of that particular motor. 

 It's exactly as he described it.  

Edited by MindBlower
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Um, he's right. ;)

It's when a two stroke "comes on the pipe" (Hit's it powerband, the part of it's rpm range where the bike makes crazy horsepower. Could be from 8,000-10,000+rpm depending on the bike.

WHEREVER that fat part is, it's described as the powerband of the bike.

A trait of that particular motor.

It's exactly as he described it.

The powerband is a figurative term of the power curve of the motor. You are correct in that it is a trait of that particular motor. However it is the full power curve that the general "powerband" term is used for. Many people are mislead when they are new to bikes that the powerband is something that kicks in. Getting on the pipe is a MUCH better way to describe it.

Edited by ttr230boyy

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I just got done with a full restoration of a 1986 KX 250. The parts for older kawasaki bikes ARE HARD TO FIND. I also did an 86 CR 250. Parts were more available for the vintage honda. You can message me if you have any questions at all about fixing up the 80's kx125

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I just got done with a full restoration of a 1986 KX 250. The parts for older kawasaki bikes ARE HARD TO FIND. I also did an 86 CR 250. Parts were more available for the vintage honda. You can message me if you have any questions at all about fixing up the 80's kx125

can you post some before and after pics, I love to see how people bring those bikes back to life

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Here is before and after of the 86 kx250 and 86 cr250 that I did. In this pic, the kx wasn't completely done yet. I haven't taken new pics yet

1400697263157.jpg

1400697330711.jpg

1400697450001.jpg

1400697483550.jpg

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Nice job on those bikes!  :thumbsup:

 

'86 is a little modern for my comment but just in case someone reads this thread looking at an older bike:

 

I bought a '76 KX125 to fix up and race. Long story short, I got the bike all setup...turn key condition.  Only problem is, I had no where to ride it.  Trails were too tight, tracks with jumps too big.  Only place to ride those old twin shock bikes is on a track made for them.  

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